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Full text of "Augustana College Catalog"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/augustanacolleg1519augu 



ft ( :..M^'A'-' 

AUGUSTANA BULLETIN 

Issued Quarterly by Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, 111. 
SERIES XII MARCH 31, 1916 No. 1 



CATALOG 



OF 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE and 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 



1915-1916 

FIFTY-SIXTH YEAR 



Entered April 18, 1905, at Rock Island, Illinois, as second class matter under 
act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



I i ; l ; i i I li 




CATALOG 



OF 



Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

Rock Island, Illinois 



1915-1916 

Fifty-sixth Year 




ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

AUGUSTANA BOOK CONCERN, PRINTERS AND BINDERS 
1916 



CALENDAR 



1916 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



MARCH 



APRIL 



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AUGUST 



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Easter Sunday, April 23. Whitsunday, June 11. 

1917 



DECEMBER 



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DECEMBER 



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School Calendar. 



1916 

FALL TERM 

Registration and Examinations for) 9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion ( September 4 and 5. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 6. 

Recitations in College, Academy, ConO 

servatory, and Commercial Depart- 19:20 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 6. 

ment begin J 

C Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 25 
Matriculation for the Seminary ) a nd 26 

Opening Lecture in the Seminary 10 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 27. 

Reformation Day Tuesday, October 31. 

(Thursday and Friday, Nov. 30 
Thanksgiving Recess | and Dec ± 

Term ends 6 P. M., Thursday, Dec. 21. 

1917 
SPRING TERM 
Recitations in the Conservatory begin 8 A. M., Monday, Jan. 8. 
Registration and Examinations for) 9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion (Jan. 8 and 9. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 10. 

Recitations in College, Academy, and 



Commercial Department begin... ' 9:20 A ' M - Wednesday, Jan. 10. 

Lectures in the Seminary begin .9:20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 17. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary begins 5 P. M., Wednesday, March 28. 
Easter Recess in the College, AcadeO 

my, and Commercial Department iNoon, Thursday, April 5. 

begins J 

Easter Recess ends 8 A. M., Tuesday, April 10. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary ends 8 A. M., Wednesday, April 11. 

Founders' Day Friday, April 27. 

Recitations and Lectures cease 6 P. M., Friday, May 25. 

Commencement Exercises May 27 — 31. 

FALL TERM 1917 

Registration Sept. 3 and 4. 

Recitations begin Sept. 5. 

Seminary opens Sept. 26. 






"*«4L 



AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Board of Directors. 



MEMBERS 

Rev. LAWRENCE ALBERT JOHNSTON, D. D., President of Synod, 
ex officio member. 

Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. 0., Presi- 
dent of the Institution, ex officio member. 

TIME EXPIRES 

Rev. ERIC PETER OLSSON, D. D., Courtland, Kans 1916 

Rev. JOHAN FREDERICK SEEDOFF, Rockford, 111 1916 

Mr. NILS ANDERSON, Burlington, Iowa 1916 

Me. BYRON LINDGREN, Minneapolis, Minn 1916 

Rev. AMANDUS FRIDOLF BERGSTROM, Moline, 111 1917 

Rev. ELOF KARDELL JONSON, Chicago, 111 1917 

Mb. NILS ANTON NELSON, Chicago, 111 1917 

Me. AUGUSTUS JOHNSON LAURENCE, Paxton, 111 1917 

Rev. A. THEODORE EKBLAD, A. M., Superior, Wis 1918 

Rev. JOHN EKHOLM, Ph. D., Swedesburg, Iowa 1918 

Mb. ANDREW JOHNSON, M. D., Omaha, Nebr 1918 

Coxsux LAWRENCE LOUIS MALM, Cleveland, Ohio 1918 

Rev. JOSEPH ALFRED ANDERSON, A. M., Boxholm, Iowa 1919 

Mb. JOHN HENRY HAUBERG, A. B., LL. B., Rock Island, 111. . . .1919 

Mr. KNUT THEODORE ANDERSON, Rock Island, 111 1919 

Rev. GOTTFRED NELSON, Chicago, 111 1919 

OFFICERS 

Rev. JOS. A. ANDERSON, Boxholm, Iowa, President. 
Rev. A. THEO. EKBLAD, Superior, Wis., Secretary. 
Pbof. ANDREW KEMPE, Rock Island, 111., Financial Secretary and 
Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. J. F. SEEDOFF, Pres. Pbof. ANDREW KEMPE, ex officio. 

Dr. G. A. ANDREEN, ex officio. Rev. A. F. BERGSTROM. 

Mb. JOHN H. HAUBERG. Mb. NILS ANDERSON. 

Mb. K. THEO. ANDERSON, Sec'y. Rev. JOSEPH A. ANDERSON. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



Faculty and Instructors. 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. 0., 

President. 

731— 35th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph. D., D. D., L. H. D., 

Vice President. 

741— 34th St. 



Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A. M., 

Secretary of the General Faculty. 



842— 44th St. 



3808— 8th Ave. 



CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph. D., 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A. M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Cor. 9th Ave. and 34th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph. D., D. D., L. H. D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 

741— 34th St. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D. D., R. N. O., 

Professor of Biblical Theology, Church History, Symbolics, Pastoral Theology and Swedish 

Homiletics. 1 ) 

608— 38th St. 

Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D. D., LL. D., R. N. O., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Hermeneutics, Liturgies, Apologetics and Church Polity. 

3826— 7th Ave. 
2 ) 

Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. CARL OTTO GRANERE, Ph. D., 

Librarian Emeritus. 



ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A. M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 



1311— 38th St. 



937— 43rd St. 



626— 38th St. 



n ) During Fall Term. 

2 ) Duties performed during the year by Prof. Isidore J. Broman. 



6 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B. D., 

Ericson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

970— 38th St. 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph. D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, Old Testament Introduction, and Evangelistics. 

825— 35th St. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A. M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

842— 44th St. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, Ph. D., 

Professor of Physics and Chemistry. 

2829— 11 y 2 Ave. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A. M., 

Professor of Philosophy, New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Introduction, and 

Homiletics. 

1010— 38th St. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B. D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

617— 44th St. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc. B., Ph. B., A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3906— 7th Ave. 
PETER BENZON, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3922— 8th Ave. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A. B., M. Accts., LL. B., 
Principal of Commercial Department. 

3932— 8th Ave. 
MARCUS SKARSTEDT, A. M., B. L. S., 

Librarian. Assistant Professor of Latin. 

43rd St. and Colona Ave., Moline 

JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A. A. G. O., 

Director of Conservatory of Music, Professor of Piano, Organ and Theory, and Director 
of Handel Oratorio Chorus and Wennerberg Male Chorus. 

1000— 38th St. 
AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A. M., Ph. D., 
Professor of Latin and Assistant Professor of English in the College. 

2917— 7th Ave. 
Rev. ADOLF HULT, B. D., 
Professor of Biblical Theology, Church History, Symbolics, Pastoral Theology, and 

Propedeutics. 

1739— 11th Ave., Moline 



OLOP GRAFSTR5M, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

831— 44th St. 
LILLIE CERVIN, B. S., 

Teacher of Piano and Assistant on the Pipe Organ. 

3814— 7th Ave. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 7 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc. B., B. E., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

727— 19th St. 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Teacher of Violin and History of Music, and Director of Orchestra. 

3908— 7th Ave. 
ROY MONROE CONRAD, B. S., 
Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. Instructor in Geography and American History. 

3908— 8th Ave. 
ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL. B., 
Teacher of Penmanship, Bookkeeping and Typewriting , and Secretary of Commercial Faculty. 

4211— 7th Ave. 
LEWIS BODMAN CANTERBURY, 
Teacher of Voice and Sight Singing. 

2507 Fulton Ave., Davenport, Iowa. 

LAWRENCE EDWIN JONES, A. B., 

Instructor in Civics. 

4006— 7th Ave. 
WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 
Teacher of Public School Music, Piano and Harmony. 

902— 5th Ave., Moline. 
MARTHA OLIVIA FOSS, A. B„ 
Intructor in German, Latin and Ancient History. 

3808— 8th Ave. 
ELMER LAWRENCE OLSON, A. B., 
Intructor in Pedagogy. 

ETTA SETTERDAHL, 

Teacher of Shorthand. 

630— 41st St. 

Robert n. Mcdonald, 

Teacher of Piano. 

119 E. 2nd St., Davenport, Iowa. 
ESTHER PRYXELL, 
Teacher of Piano. 

715— 3rd St., Moline. 
ALTHEA BROWN, 
Teacher of Voice. 

1202— 12th St., Moline. 
ISIDORE JOHN BROMAN, A. B., 
Professor of Biology, Geology and Astronomy. 



ARVID SAMUELSON 

Professor of Piano. 

KARL LARSON, A. B„ 

Instructor in Physics and Chemistry. 

ARTHUR B. NICHOLSON, 

Instructor in Typewriting and Spelling. 



619— 42nd St. 



738— 34th St. 



4006— 7th Ave. 



4215— 7th Ave. 



AT7GUSTA> T A COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ALVIN LUGN, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

ARTHUR ANDERS LEVIN, 

Assistant in Biology. 

LAWRENCE LUNDBERG, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

VICTORIA SWANBECK, 

Assistant, in Arithmetic. 



4115— 7th Are. 



610— 40th St. 



3411— 6th Ave. 



4303— 7th Ave. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Officers and Standing Committees 

Matriculation Committee in Seminary — Rev. Dr. L. A. Johnston, Presi- 
dent of the Augustana Synod, Pres. G. A. Andreen, Professors N. For- 
sander, C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Secretary), C. J. Sodergren, 
and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Appointments — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors N. Forsander, C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren, C. J. Soder- 
gren, S. J. Sebelius (Secretary), and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Students' Aid — President G. A. Andreen, Professors 
C. E. Lindberg, N. Forsander, C. A. Blomgren (Treasurer), C. J. So- 
dergren (Secretary), Adolf Hult, C. W. Foss, C. L. E. Esbjorn, J. Mau- 
ritzson (Chairman), and S. J. Sebelius (Vice Chairman). 

Library and Museum Committee — President G. A. Andreen (Chair- 
man), Marcus Skarstedt (Secretary), Professors C. A. Blomgren, L. W. 
Kling, C. J. Sodergren, and J. Mauritzson. 

Library Staff — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt, A. M., B. L. S., Librarian; 
Drusilla Vera Erickson, Library assistant; Mamie Melinda Johnson, 
Library assistant; Adolf Martin Benson, student Library assistant. 

Board of Control of Athletics — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors C. J. Sodergren, S. J. Sebelius, W. E. Cederberg, A. Kempe 
(Treasurer), Messrs. K. T. Anderson, Knut Erickson, Arthur Swedberg, 
R. M. Conrad (Manager), and Julius Johnson (Secretary). 

Curator of Archives — Prof. C. W. Foss. 

Librarian and Curator of Museum — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt. 

Secretary of General Faculty — Prof. A. W. Kjellstrand. 

Secretary of Theological Faculty — Prof. C. J. Sodergren. 

Secretary of College Faculty — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt. 

Secretary of Conservatory Faculty — Miss Althea Brown. 

Secretary of Commercial Faculty — Prof. A. Milton. 

Class Guardians in Seminary — Senior: Professors N. Forsander and 
A. Hult; Middle: Prof. C. J. Sodergren; Junior: Prof. C. E. Lindberg. 

Class Guardians in College and Academy — Senior: Prof. A. W. Kjell- 
strand; Junior: Prof. G. A. Andreen; Sophomore: Prof. S. J. Sebelius; 
Freshman: Prof. P. Benzon; Fourth Class: Prof. C. W. Foss; Third 
Class: Prof. C. L. Esbjorn; Second Class: Prof. L. W. Kling; First 
Class: Prof. W. E. Cederberg; Preparatory Class: Prof. A. R. Wallin. 

Class Guardians in Conservatory — Professor J. Victor Bergquist and 
Miss Lillie Cervin. 

Class Guardians in Commercial Department — Professor A. Kempe 
and Miss Etta Setterdahl. 



12 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Departments and Courses. 

The institution comprizes the following eight Departments or 
Schools: 

I. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, in which boys and girls 
deficient in common school branches are prepared for admission to the 
Academy. 

II. THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT has in view the twofold object, 
first, of preparing students for entering College, and, secondly, of afford- 
ing young men and women whose circumstances do not permit their 
taking a college course the opportunity of acquiring a more complete 
general education than can be obtained in the common schools. 

III. THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT is designed to give the 
systematic discipline in liberal studies usually required for the bacca- 
laureate degree. The curriculum is arranged on a combined "group" 
and elective system, and the degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
all who successfully complete the course of study in any group of this 
department. 

IV. THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT is designed to prepare for 
teaching in public or parochial schools. 

V. THE THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT affords instruction and 
training in all the theoretical and practical subjects entering into a 
proper preparation for the gospel ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

VI. THE POST-GRADUATE DEPARTMENT offers courses leading 
to advanced degrees in literary and scientific as well as theological 
studies, under the direction of the Collegiate and Theological Faculties 
respectively. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts, see Collegiate 
Department, Post-Graduate Courses. 

For courses leading to advanced theological studies, see Theological 
Seminary, Post-Graduate Courses. 

VII. THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND SCHOOL OF ART, 
the former of which embraces four distinct courses: Preparatory; a 
Teachers' Certificate course, extending usually over three years and 
dsigned to train teachers of music; a Diploma course of one additional 
years, designed to furnish a thoro musical education; and a Post- 
graduate course of two years, intended for those who desire to pursue 
higher musical studies. In the School of Art instruction is given in 
Drawing and various branches of Painting, and also in Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

VIII. THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT affords young men and 
women opportunities for acquiring a thoro business training under 
Christian influences. The courses of study are the same as those of 
other first-class business colleges. The course in Phonography and 
Typewriting aims principally to fit young men and women for posi- 
tions as stenographers or private secretaries. The instruction is indi- 
vidual, and so suited to the peculiarities of each student as to bring 
out the best results possible. The course in Penmanship is designed 
to meet the requirements of those who wish to become teachers of pen- 
manship and pen art, or who desire to obtain positions as policy writers, 
designers, engrossers, etc. 



12 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMIXABY 



Departments and Courses. 

The institution comprizes the following eight Departments or 
Schools: 

I. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, in which boys and girls 
deficient in common school branches are prepared for admission to the 
Academy. 

II. THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT has in view the twofold object, 
first, of preparing students for entering College, and, secondly, of afford- 
ing young men and women whose circumstances do not permit their 
taking a college course the opportunity of acquiring a more complete 
general education than can be obtained in the common schools. 

III. THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT is designed to give the 
systematic discipline in liberal studies usually required for the bacca- 
laureate degree. The curriculum is arranged on a combined "group" 
and elective system, and the degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
all who successfully complete the course of study in any group of this 
department. 

IV. THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT is designed to prepare for 
teaching in public or parochial schools. 

V. THE THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT affords instruction and 
training in all the theoretical and practical subjects entering into a 
proper preparation for the gospel ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

VI. THE POST-GRADUATE DEPARTMENT offers courses leading 
to advanced degrees in literary and scientific as well as theological 
studies, under the direction of the Collegiate and Theological Faculties 
respectively. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts, see Collegiate 
Department, Post-Graduate Courses. 

For courses leading to advanced theological studies, see Theological 
Seminary, Post-Graduate Courses. 

VII. THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND SCHOOL OF ART, 
the former of which embraces four distinct courses: Preparatory; a 
Teachers' Certificate course, extending usually over three years and 
dsigned to train teachers of music; a Diploma course of one additional 
years, designed to furnish a thoro musical education; and a Post- 
graduate course of two years, intended for those who desire to pursue 
higher musical studies. In the School of Art instruction is given in 
Drawing and various branches of Painting, and also in Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

VIII. THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT affords young men and 
women opportunities for acquiring a thoro business training under 
Christian influences. The courses of study are the same as those of 
other first-class business colleges. The course in Phonography and 
Typewriting aims principally to fit young men and women for posi- 
tions as stenographers or private secretaries. The instruction is indi- 
vidual, and so suited to the peculiarities of each student as to bring 
out the best results possible. The course in Penmanship is designed 
to meet the requirements of those who wish to become teachers of pen- 
manship and pen art, or who desire to obtain positions as policy writers, 
designers, engrossers, etc. 



14 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 



The Collegiate, Academic and 
Preparatory Departments. 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. 0., 

President. 

CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph. D., 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A. M„ 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph. D., D. D., L. H. D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 



Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A. M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B. D., 

Ericson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A. M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, Ph. D., 

Professor of Physics and Chemistry. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B. D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc. B., Ph. B., A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

PETER BENZON, A. B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

MARCUS SKARSTEDT, A. M., B. L. S., 

Librarian. Assistant Professor of Latin. Secretary of the Faculty. 

l ) Duties performed during j-ear by Prof. I. J. Broman. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 15 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A. M., Ph. D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy and Assistant Professor of English in the College. 

ISIDORE JOHN BROMAN, A. B., 

Professor of Biology, Geology and Astronomy. 

OLOF GRAFSTRoM, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc. B., B. B., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B. S., 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. Instructor in Geography and American History. 

LAWRENCE EDWIN JONES, A. B., 

Instructor in Civics. 

MARTHA OLIVIA FOSS, A. B., 

Intructor in German, Latin and Ancient History. 

ELMER LAWRENCE OLSON, A. B., 

Assistant in Pedagogy. 

ARTHUR ANDERS LEVIN, 

Assistant in Biology. 

KARL LARSON, A. B., 

Instructor in Physics and Chemistry. 

ALVIN LUGN, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

LAWRENCE LUNDBERG, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

VICTORIA SWANBECK, 

Assistant in Arithmetic. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission must furnish satisfactory evidence of good 
moral character and of such scholarship as will enable them successfully 
to pursue the courses of study in the classes to which they are assigned. 
Students coming from other institutions, whether high schools, acad- 
emies, or colleges, should present a properly certified, detailed state- 
ment of their work at such institutions. This statement, for which a 
blank will be furnished on application, should, if possible, be in the 
hands of the President of the institution before the fifteenth day of 
August in case the student expects to enter in September, and before 
the fifteenth day of December when the student expects to enter the 
following January. It is desirable that a catalog of the institution 
attended should accompany the credits. 



16 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

THE ACADEMY 

For admission to the Academy an ordinary common-school educatioi 
is required. Applicants for admission deficient in the common-schoo 
branches will be assigned to the Preparatory Department. 

THE COLLEGE 

A candidate will be admitted into the Freshman class upon presenta 
tion of fifteen entrance units as defined by the North Central Associa 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, viz.: 

A. General Requirements. 

English 3 units 

One Foreign Language 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

9 unit 

B. Special Requirements. 

I. & II. The Classical Groups (Classical A and Classical B). 

1 ) The General Requirements 9 units 

2) Latin, four units, making additional foreign 

language 2 units 

3) Electives (see page 17) 4 units 

15 unit! 

III. The Modern Language Group. 

1) The General Requirements 9 units 

2) Electives (see page 17) 6 units 

15 units 

Note. The two units in modern language 
for this group must be in German. 

IV. The Latin- Scientific Group. 

1) The General Requirements 9 units 

2) Latin, four units, making additional foreign 

language 2 units 

3) Electives (see page 17) 4 units 

15 unit* 

V. The General Science Group. 

1) The General Requirements 9 units 

2) Algebra (additional) y 2 unit 

3) Science (additional) 1 unit 

4) Electives (see page 17) iy 2 units 

15 units 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 17 

VI. The Mathematical Group. 

1) The General Requirements 9 units 

2) Algebra (additional) y 2 unit 

3) Solid Geometry y 2 unit 

4) Electives (see below) 5 units 

15 units 

The electives above referred to must be made up from the subjects 

in the list below. No subject is accepted for an amount less than the 
minimum or greater than the maximum mentioned in the list. 

Elective Units 
Christianity will be credited hour for hour. Maximum of 

credits allowed 17 credits 

Civics y 2 or 1 unit 

Economics y 2 unit 

English y 2 or 1 unit 

Foreign Language. French 1 to 4 units 

German 1 to 4 units 

Greek 1 to 3 units 

Latin 1 to 4 units 

History y 2 to 3 units 

Mathematics. Algebra, Advanced y 2 unit 

Arithmetic, Commercial or Advanced y 2 unit 

Geometry, Solid and Spherical y 2 unit 

Trigonometry, Plane y 2 unit 

Science. Astronomy y 2 unit 

Botany y 2 or 1 unit 

Chemistry y 2 or 1 unit 

Geology y 2 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

Physiography y 2 or 1 unit 

Physiology y 2 or 1 unit 

Zoology y 2 or 1 unit 

f wedish 1 to 4 units 

Ivanced Accounting 1 unit 

bookkeeping y 2 or 1 unit 

Commercial Geography y 2 unit 

Commercial Law y 2 unit 

Elementary Law y 2 unit 

Drawing y 2 or 1 unit 

Drawing books or plates must be submitted. 

Two hours of class room work counts as one hour. 

History of Education y 2 unit 

Manual Training (exclusive of Drawing) y 2 or 1 unit 

Music i/ 2 or 1 unit 

2 



18 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

ADVANCED CREDITS 
No advanced credits will be given to candidates for admission to 
College, except 

1) for work of a distinctively college grade, in which case the candi- 
date must pass an examination in such work upon entering Col- 
lege; and 

2) for the work done by graduates of our own Academy in excess 
of the 15 units required for admission into College, for which 
extra work 10 college credits will be allowed. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATES 
Applicants furnishing certificates of work successfully completed at 
any institution of a grade equal to that of Augustana College or at any 
high school or academy on the accredited list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be given credit for 
such work without examination. In all other cases applicants for 
admission will be admitted on probation or by examination. No student 
will be received into the Freshman class who lacks more than 1 unit 
in the number of the required entrance credits. All entrance conditions 
must be removed within a year. For dates of examination for admis- 
sion see Calendar, page 3. 

SELECT COURSES 
Students who do not wish to take a full course may select such 
studies in any department as they are prepared to pursue to advantage. 
But all such select courses are subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

ENROLMENT 

Students are not enrolled in any department of instruction until they 
have registered in the President's office, and have paid their tuition 
for the term in the Treasurer's office. 

Applicants may be received at any time, but prompt attendance at the 
opening of each term must be considered the rule, as work in all classes 
begins promptly on the first day, and students coming later are at a 
great disadvantage. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Every student is required to pursue the study of Christianity during 
each term of his residence at the institution. But no student is re- 
quired to make up any courses in Christianity below the class in which 
he is first enrolled. 

SWEDISH 
A very full course in the Swedish language and literature may be 
taken in connection with each of the six groups. 

It should not, however, be inferred that a student must either take 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 19 

no Swedish at all or else the entire course. He may take up any course 
for which he is properly qualified and may then discontinue the study 
at the end of any complete course. 

It should be added that for the benefit of high school graduates and 
other students coming from schools where no opportunity has been 
offered for the study of Swedish, a two hour course in Swedish Gram- 
mar will be given thruout the first year in College, thus affording a 
reasonably good, brief preparation for the study of Swedish literature. 
Students of Swedish parentage are urged to devote as much time as 
possible to the study of the beautiful language of their forefathers. 
Sentimental considerations aside, the practical advantages of such study 
to the clergyman, the teacher, the physician, the lawyer, the business 
man, the cultured man in any walk of life, are sufficiently obvious 
without being specially pointed out. 



20 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 



Outline of Courses of Study. 



Note. In the following schedules the numeral in parenthesis after 
each subject denotes the number of the course as described under 
"Courses of Instruction" (pp. 24 and ft\). The other numeral after each 
subject denotes the number of "credits" for the course in question and 
corresponds to the number of recitations in the subject per week for 
one term — two hours of laboratory work, drawing, or elocution counting 
the same as one recitation. 



PREPAR 


ATC 

5 
2 
5 
3 

2 

5- 

3- 


)RY DEPARTMENT 




PALL TERM 

Arithmetic (1) 
Christianity (1) 
English (1) 
Geography (1) 
Penmanship (1) 
U. S. History (1) 
Swedish (3) (Optional)* 


-22 
-25 


SPRING TERM 

Arithmetic (2) 
Christianity (2) 
English (2) 
Geography (2) 
Penmanship (2) 
U. S. History (2) 
Swedish (4) (Optional)* 


5 

2 

2 

3 

2 

5—22 

3—25 




ACADEMY 






FIRST CLASS 




FALL TEEM 

Algebra (3) 
Bible Geography (3) 
English (3) 
Latin (3) 
Physiography (3) 


5 
1 
4 
5 
5- 


-20 


SPRING TERM 

Algebra (4) 
Bible Geography (4) 
English (4) 
Latin (4) 
Botany (4) 


5 
1 
4 
5 
5—20 



Swedish (3) (Optional)* 3—23 Swedish (4) (Optional)* 3—23 



SECOND CLASS 



FALL TERM 

Ancient History (5) 5 

Biblical Antiquities (5) 1 

English (5) or Swedish (5)* 5 
Latin (5) 5 

Plane Geometry (5) 4—20 



SPRING TERM 

Ancient History (6) 

Biblical Biography (6) 

English (6) 

Latin (6) 

Plane Geometry (6) 



4 
2 
4 
5 
5—20 



* The optional Swedish of the First class must be taken, either in class or by examina- 
tion, by all who expect to take Second and Third Class Swedish. 

Students wishing to take both II English and Swedish may, with the approval of the 
Faculty, do so, by taking, as an extra, two hours of the course in Swedish (Swedish 5a) 
during the Fall term of their Second year, and the remaining three hours of the course 
(Swedish 5b) during the Fall term of the Third year. Similarly, they may take Swedish 
8a (2 hours) in the Spring term of the Second class, and Swedish 8b (3 hours) in the 
Spring term of the Third class, thus carrying Swedish continually thruout the Academy. 
The Academy Swedish must be elected by all who expect to continue the study of Swedish 
in College. 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 



21 



THIRD CLASS 
A. Course preparing for Groups I, II, and III in College. 

SPRING TERM 

Christianity (8a) 1 

German (8) 5 

Latin (8) 5 

English (8) or Swedish (8) 

or Physiology (8) 5 

Christianity (8b) or Solid and 

Spherical Geometry (8) 4—20 



FALL TERM 






Christianity (7) 


1 




German (7) 


5 




Latin (7) 


5 




English (7) 


5 




Advanced Algebra (7) 


4- 


-20 



B. Course preparing for Group IV in College. 



fall term 

Christianity (7) 1 

Latin (7) 5 

English (7) 5 

Civics (7) or German (7) or 

Zoology (7) or Swedish (5) 5 

Plane Geometry (7) 4- 



-20 



SPRING TERM 

Christianity (8a) 1 

Latin (8) 5 

English (8) or Swedish (8) 

or Zoology (8) 5 

German (8) or U. S. His- 
tory (8) 5 
Christianity (8b) or Solid 
Geometry (8) 4—20 



C. Course preparing for Groups V and VI in College. 



fall term 
Christianity (7) 1 

Plane Geometry (7) 4 

Civics (7) or Zoology (7) 5 
English (7) 5 

German (7) or Latin (7) or 
Swedish (5) 5—20 



SPRING TERM 

Christianity (8a) 
Solid Geometry (8) 
Physiology (8) 
English (8), German 

Latin (8), Swedish 

— any two 



(8) 
(8) 



10—20 



FOURTH CLASS 
Course preparing for Groups I, II, and III in College. 



FALL TERM 






spring term 




Christianity (9) 


1 




Christianity (10) 


1 


Drawing (9a or 9b) or 






Drawing (10a or 10b) or 




Elocution (9) or 






Elocution (10) or 




Swedish (9) 


1 




Swedish (10) 


1 


German (9) 


4 




English (10) 


4 


English (9) 


4 




German (10) 


4 


Latin (9) 


5 




Latin (10) 


5 


Physics (9) 


5- 


-20 


Physics (10) 


5- 


B. Course preparing for Group IV in College. 




fall term 






SPRING TERM 




Chemistry (9) 


4 




Chemistry (10) 


4 


Christianity (9) 


1 




Christianity (10) 


1 


Drawing (9a or 9b) or 






Drawing (10a or 10b) or 




Elocution (9) or 






Elocution (10) or 




Swedish (9) 


1 




Swedish (10) 


1 


English (9) 


4 




English (10) 


4 


Latin (9) 


5 




Latin (10) 


5 


Physics (9) 


5- 


-20 


Physics (10) 


5- 



-20 



5—20 



22 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

C. Course preparing for Groups V and VI in College. 

FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

Chemistry (9) 4 Chemistry (10) 4 

Christianity (9) 1 Christianity (10) 1 

Drawing (9a or 9b) or Drawing (10a or 10b) or 
Elocution (9) or Elocution (10) or 

Swedish (9) 1 Swedish (10) 1 

English (9) 4 English (10) 4 

German (9) -f Elective (one German (10)+Elective (one 

hour) or Latin (9) 5 hour) or Latin (10) 5 

Physics (9) 5—20 Physics (10) 5—20 

Total of Academy credits required, 160. 

COLLEGE 

The studies offered in the College are arranged in the six following 
parallel courses or "groups": 

I. The Classical A, IV. The Latin-Scientific, 

II. The Classical B, V. The General Science, 

III. The Modern Language, VI. The Mathematical. 

Each of these groups comprizes, (1) studies common to all groups 
and known as "basic" subjects, (2) studies characteristic of the partic- 
ular group in which they occur, known as "group" subjects, and (3) 
electives. 

The groups are assumed to be equally difficult and honorable and are 
designed to promote specialization along some particular line of study 
of the student's own choice, while at the same time insisting upon 
certain fundamental disciplines with which it is believed every educated 
man of the present day should be familiar. 

The horizontal lines in the following schedules separate the basic 
subjects of each term from the group subjects and electives. 

I. The Classical Group A. 

English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 



Greek, (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16) 28 

Latin, (11), (12) 8 

Drawing or Elocution, (11), (12) 2 

Electives and Christianity 62 

120 
II. The Classical Group B. 

English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AS 

Greek, (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16) 28 credits 

Latin, (11), (12), or Swedish, (11a), (12a) 8 

Drawing or Elocution, (11), (12) 2 

Electives and Christianity 62 

120 
III. The Modern Language Group. 

English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 



French, (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16) 26 

German, (11), (12) 8 

Drawing or Elocution, (11), (12) 2 

Electives and Christianity 64 " 

120 
IV. The Latin-Science Group. 

English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 



Biology, (13), (14) 8 

Chemistry, (11), (12), (13), (14) 18 

Geology, (15a or 15b), (16) 8 

Latin, (11), (12) 8 

Drawing or Elocution, (11), (12) 2 

Electives and Christianity 56 



120 



V. The General Science Group. 



English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 



Biology, (13), (14) 8 

Chemistry, (11), (12), (13), (14) 18 

Geology, (15a or 15b), (16) 8 

Mathematics, (lib), (12b) 8 

Physics, (15), (16) 8 

Drawing or Elocution, (11), (12) 2 

Electives and Christianity 48 

120 



24 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

VI. The Mathematical Group. 

English, (11), (12), (13), (14) 12 credits 

History, (13), (14) 8 

Mathematics, (11a), (lib), (12a), (13a), (14a), (15a), (16a), 

[or (15b), (16b)] 24 

Physics, (15), (16) 8 

Drawing, (11a or b), (12) 8 

Electives and Christianity 60 

120 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The following courses of study are numbered by terms, the school 
year being divided into two terms, Fall and Spring. The odd numbers, 
1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, represent respectively the Fall Term courses 
of the Preparatory class, the First, the Second, the Third, and the 
Fourth classes of the Academy, and the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, 
and Senior classes of the College; while the even numbers, 2, 4, 6, 8, 
10, 12, 14, 16, and 18, designate the Spring Term courses of the same 
classes. No elective course will be given unless a sufficient number of 
students apply for the same. 

ASTRONOMY 
COLLEGE 
18a. General Astronomy. 

General principles and history, a large part of the work mathe- 
matical. Prerequisite: Mathematics 13b. 4 hours. 

18b. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Reading of text-book; lectures; practise in the identification 

of constellations and named stars and in the finding of the 

positions of the members of the solar system, and in the use of 

a small telescope. 2 hours. 

Note. Only four credits will be given should any student take both 

18a and 18b. 

BIOLOGY 
For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 
4. Elementary Botany. 

Reading of text-books; examinations of a series of types of 
the larger divisions of the plant kingdom; a brief course in the 
general classification of plants; drills in descriptive terminology 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 25 

by means of charts; determination of seventy-five species of 
phenogams. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

7. Elementary Zoology. 

Three hours recitations and two periods of two hours each 
laboratory work. Recitations from a text-book and lectures on 
elementary morphology; dissection of ten or twelve types, verte- 
brates and invertebrates; determination of about 200 museum 
specimens. Should be elected by all who wish to take Advanced 
Zoology. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

8. Elementary Physiology. 

Text-book recitations, lectures, and demonstrations. The labo- 
ratory work will supplement the recitations with experiments, 
dissections, and the examination of anatomical preparations and 
models. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

COLLEGE 

13. Physiological Botany. 

Two hours of recitations and two periods of two hours each 
of laboratory work. Recitations from a suitable text-book. The 
laboratory work will include qualitative and quantitative experi- 
ments upon the principal plant activities. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

14. Zoology.* 

Two hours of recitations and two periods of two hours each 
laboratory work. Text-book recitations and lectures; reading of 
reference works; laboratory work upon the function and struc- 
ture of the organs of animals from the various phyla. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

14a. Physiology.* 

Two hours of recitations and two periods of two hours each 
laboratory work. Text-book recitations and lectures; qualitative 
and quantitative experiments upon the various physiological 
activities. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

* Given alternate years. 



26 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

BOTANY 

See Biology. 

CHEMISTRY 

For laboratory fees see General Information. 
ACADEMY 
9 and 10. Elementaby Chemistry. 

Class-room and laboratory work. 

This is a beginners' course designed to meet the requirements 
of those who can devote only one year to chemistry. It also 
serves as an introduction to a more systematic study of the 
subject. 

Two hours of class exercises and four hours of laboratory work 
thruout the year. Each course 4 credits. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Inorganic Chemistry. 

Two hours lectures and recitations, four hours laboratory 
practise thruout the year. 

This is a course in the fundamental principles of Chemistry. 
The basis of the work is a systematic course of laboratory ex- 
periments, from which the subject is developed and amplified 
by individual instruction in the laboratory and class-room. Such 
texts as Alexander Smith's "General Chemistry for Colleges" or 
W. A. Noye's "Inorganic Chemistry" indicate the scope of the 
work. 
Prerequisites: Courses 9 and 10 or their equivalent. 

Each course 4 credits. 

13. Qualitative Analysis. 

Two hours lectures and recitations, six hours laboratory prac- 
tise during the first semester. This course covers the char- 
acteristic reactions of the common metals and acids and a com- 
plete quantitative analysis of some commercial substances. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11 and 12 or their equivalent. 

5 credits. 

14. Quantitative Analysis. 

One hour lecture and recitation work, eight hours laboratory 
practise during the second semester. The course comprises the 
complete analysis, both by gravimetric and volumetric methods, 
of a few selected minerals and commercial substances. 

Prerequisites: Course 13. 5 credits. 

15. Organic Chemistry. 

A theoretical and experimental study of the carbon compounds, 
aliphatic series. 4 credits. 



augustana college 27 

16. Organic Chemistry. 

A continuation of course 15, the aromatic series. 

4 credits. 
16a. Assaying. 

Assay of gold, silver, copper and lead ores. 2 credits. 

17. Electrochemistry. 

A theoretical and experimental study of electrochemical proc- 
esses. 4 credits. 

18. Physical Chemistry. 

A class-room and laboratory study of the more recent develop- 
ments in chemical science. 2 or 4 credits. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Instruction in the science of the Christian religion is intended to 
supply an essential element in a liberal education with a view to com- 
pleteness of character. Aside from its inherent worth and its bearing 
on the higher issues of life, it also aims to provide such information 
and to foster such principles as will enable the graduate to discharge 
the duties of Christian citizenship, and in every vocation to achieve 
something more than material success. 

PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Bible Readings. 

Text-book by Schmauk. Each course 2 hours. 

ACADEMY 
3 and 4. Bible Geography. 

Geography of the Holy Land and other Bible lands, Babylonia, 
Egypt, Asia Minor, etc., in a historical setting. 
Text-book: Schmauk, Bible Geography. Each course 1 hour. 

5. Biblical Antiquities. 

A study of the social, civil and religious conditions of the 
Jewish people in Bible times. 
Text-book: Mackie, Bible Manners and Customs. 1 hour. 

6. Biblical Biography. 

A study of the characters in Holy Writ. 

Text-book: Whitteker's Bible Biography. 2 hours. 

7 and 8a. Bible Teachings. 

A brief exposition of "the Christian religion both for the guid- 
ance of faith and intellect and for the formation of character." 
Text-book: Joseph Stump's Bible Teaching. 

Each course 1 hour. 



28 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

8b. Christian Doctrine. 

The essentials of the doctrines of the Christian religion. 
Text-book: Norbeck-Wahlin, Troslara. 

Elective with Solid Geometry (in preparation for groups I, II 
III and IV). 4 hours. 

9 and 10. History of Foreign Missions. 

Text-book: Bliss, The Missionary Enterprise. 

Each course 1 hour. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Church History. 

Text-book: Lovgren, Church History. Each course 2 hours. 

13 and 14. History of the Apostolic Age. 

Text: The Bible, American Standard Version. 

Each course 1 hour. 

15 and 16. The Life of Christ. 

An historical study of the life and teaching of our Lord based 
on the four Gospels. 
Recitations from a suitable text-book. Notes and Lectures. 

Each course 2 hours. 

17. Christian Ethics. 

Lectures and notes. Reports on assigned topics. Recitations. 
Text-book: Alexander, Christian Ethics. 1 hour. 

18. Social Teachings of Christianity. 

The purpose of this study is to give the student a practical 
knowledge of the leading facts and principles of the social teach- 
ings of the New Testament in their historical setting and in their 
application to modern social problems. 

Recitations. Reports on assigned subjects. 1 hour. 

CIVICS 

See Political Science. 

DRAWING 
ACADEMY 

9a and 10a. Free-hand Drawing. 

These courses include instruction in drawing, light and shade, 
portrait, landscape, composition, animals, fruits, flowers, etc.; in 
charcoal, crayon, and pencil. Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

If a student so desires, the requirements in these courses will 
be increased so as to give each course 2 credits. 

For advanced courses in Drawing see School of Art. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 29 

9b and 10b. Elementary Mecbanical Drawing. 

Problems in geometry; elements of orthographic and isometric 
projections. Two hours of drawing. Each course 1 credit. 

If a student so desires, the requirements in these courses will 
be increased so as to give for each course 2 credits. 

COLLEGE 
11a and 12a, 

These courses are a continuation of courses 9a and 10a. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit, 
lib. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering; principles of isometric, cabinet and orthographic 
projections with applications on plane sections and intersections 
of surfaces; machine sketching and working drawings. 4 credits. 

lie. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

This course is given together with course lib, with which it 
corresponds, except that elementary problems in shades and 
shadows and perspective take the place of machine sketching 
and working drawings. 4 credits. 

12. Descriptive Geometry. 

Theory of orthographic projection; discussion, proof, and 
graphic solution of theoretical and practical problems. Pre- 
requisites: Drawing 11a or lib. 4 credits. 

ECONOMICS 

See Political Science. 

ELOCUTION 
ACADEMY 
9 and 10. Principles of Expression. 

See Elocution, under Conservatory of Music and School of Art. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Poblic Speaking. 

These courses in public speaking include the study of the 
principles of effective speaking and the delivery of extemporane- 
ous speeches. Prerequisites: Courses 9 and 10. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

ENGLISH 

PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. English Grammar and Practical Exercises. 

Each course 5 hours. 



30 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

For those unable to speak and read the English language a 
more elementary course will also be given. The number of hours 
and the character of the instruction in this course will depend 
upon the needs of the students assigned to it. 

ACADEMY 

3. Composition. 

Elementary Composition. Selections from Hawthorne, Long- 
fellow, and Irving's Sketch Book. Paragraph writing, and writ- 
ten reports on assigned readings. 4 hours. 

4. Composition. 

Elementary Composition. Readings: Vicar of Wakefield. 
Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, Hawthorne's House of the Seven 
Gables. Paragraph writing and written reports on assigned read- 
ings. 4 hours. 

5. Etymology and Literature. 

Text-book on Etymology. Readings: Pilgrim's Progress. 
Franklin's Autobiography, Silas Marner, Lady of the Lake, selec- 
tions from Bryant, Holmes, and Lowell. Paragraph writing and 
written reports on assigned readings. 5 hours. 

€. Composition and Literature. 

Scott and Denney's Composition-Literature. Readings: Roger 
de Coverly Papers. Carlyle's Essay on Burns. Merchant of Venice, 
Ruskin's Sesame and Lilies, Carlyle's Hero as Prophet, Burns' 
Cotter's Saturday Night. Paragraph writing and written reports 
on assigned readings. 4 hours. 

7. Rhetoric. 

Quackenbos' Elements of Rhetoric. Readings: Burke's On 
Conciliation with America, Bacon's Essays, Julius Caesar, Vision 
of Sir Launfal, Ancient Mariner. Written reports on assigned 
readings. 5 hours. 

8. Advanced Course in English Grammar. 

Study of the English sentence; its analysis and structure. Se- 
lections from authors studied with special reference to these 
points. 5 hours. 

9. American Literature. 

History of American Literature. Study of American authors, 
with analyses and written reports on assigned readings. 

4 hours. 

10. History of English Literature. 

Text-book course, supplemented by lectures; written reports on 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 31 

assigned readings; theme writing, one hour each week; two 
original essays. 4 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Rhetobic and Composition. 

Study of text-book. Principles of Composition. Frequent exer- 
cises in theme writing. Two original essays. 3 hours. 

12. Rhetoric and Composition. 

Study of text-book. Principles of Composition. Frequent exer- 
cises in theme writing. Two original essays. 3 hours. 

13. Early English Literature. 

Study of Beowulf; Chaucer; Spenser. Lectures. Preparation 
of note-books. Reports on collateral reading. Two original es- 
says. 3 hours. 

14. Literature of the Queex Anne Period. 

a ) The Classicists. Study of Dryden, Pope, Addison. 

R) The English Essay. Study of De Quincey, Lamb, Macaulay. 
Special attention given to the philosophy of style. Lectures. 
Preparation of note-books. Reports on assigned topics. Two 
original essays. 3 hours. 

15a. The Romantic Movement. 

Use of text-book. History of Romanticism. Lectures. Reports 
on assigned topics. Discussion of the forces at work in the 
romantic movement. 3 hours. 

15b. Debating and Argumentation. 

Theoretical and practical. 2 hours. 

16. English Fiction. 

Use of one or more text-books. History and development of 
the English novel. Lectures on the causes and significance of 
English fiction. Synopses of typical works of fiction. Reports 
on assigned topics. 3 hours. 

17a. Dramatic Art. 

Lectures. Study of Shakespeare's plays. Analysis of charac- 
ters. Theses on assigned plays. Preparation of charts to illus- 
trate technique of the drama. 2 hours. 

17b. Poetry of Browning and Tennyson. 

Lectures. Critical and interpretative study of selected poems. 
Relation of Browning and Tennyson to the Victorian period. 
The study of Browning and of Tennyson are separate courses 



32 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 

and will be given alternate years. The course in Browning is 
offered for 1916. Each course 2 hours. 

18a. Litebaey Criticism. 

Lectures on the principles of criticism. Reports on assigned 
readings. Class discussions. 2 hours. 

18b. English Seminar. 

Study of English and American masterpieces. Critical and 
biographical theses. Free discussions. 2 hours. 

FRENCH 
COLLEGE 

11. Elementary French. 

Edgren's Grammar. Reading of 100 pages of easy French; 
constant drill in pronunciation; study of the French verb. 

5 hours. 

12. Elementary French. 

Reading of 250 pages of modern prose. Syntax and composi- 
tion. 5 hours. 

13. Second Year French. 

Reading of 300 pages of modern texts. Sight readings; trans- 
lation into French. 4 hours. 

14. Second Year French. 

Reading of three classical plays; prepared and sight reading 
of modern prose; exercises in conversation. 4 hours. 

15. Third Year French. 

Corneille's Le Cid; Moliere's Le Misanthrope; Racine's Athalie; 
300 pages modern prose. 4 credits. 

16. Third Year French. 

Passy's Le Frangais ParU; Chateaubriand's Atala, Ren6 and 
Le dernier Abencerage; A. de Rougemont's Manuel de la Littera- 
ture Frangaise; Lazare's French Composition; 500 pages of mod- 
ern prose. 4 credits. 
GEOGRAPHY 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Descriptive Geography. Each course 3 hours. 

GEOLOGY 
ACADEMY 
3. Physiography. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book; practical studies con- 
sisting of observations of weather changes and examinations of 
weather maps, study of topographic maps, and of local topog- 
raphy. 5 hours. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 33 

COLLEGE 
15a. Mineralogy.* 

A review of the general properties of minerals and the methods 
of observing these; identification of a limited series of the more 
common minerals. 4 hours. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

15b. Meteorology.* 

Recitations from text-book; manipulation of meteorological 
instruments; study of cyclones and anticyclones from files of 
daily weather maps; tabulation of the elements of local weather 
and climate. 4 hours. 

16. Geology. 

Three hours of recitations; one period of two hours of labora- 
tory work. 

Reading of a suitable text-book; lectures on the classification 
and genesis of the more common rocks, and land forms, with 
work in identifying the most common minerals, rocks and fossils; 
two or three field excursions. Desirable as preparation: Ele- 
mentary Zoology. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

GERMAN 

ACADEMY 

7. Elementary German. 

Brief introductory survey of etymology, using Thomas' Prac- 
tical German Grammar. Reading of 150 pages of easy prose, 
with coincident special study of the German verb. Constant 
practise in pronunciation. 5 hours. 

8. Elementary German. 

Reading of 350 pages of easy modern prose. Grammar in close 
connection with reading. Special study of the German noun. 
Translation into German of 30 pages of easy text. 5 hours. 

9. Second Year German. 

Reading of one play of Schiller. Composition. 4 hours. 

10. Second Year German. 

Goethe's Hermann und Dorothea or Iphigenie auf Tauris. 
Modern plays. Narrative prose. Colloquial German. 4 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Third Year German. 

A drama of Lessing; a drama of Schiller or Goethe. Collateral 
reading of at least 300 pages of narrative prose. 4 hours. 

* Given alternate vears. 



34 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

12. Thibd Year German. 

Translation from English into Gorman. Outlines of German 
literature. Collateral reading, 500 pages. 4 hours. 

13. Fourth Year German. 

German conversation. Discussion of grammatical questions in 
German. Collateral reading of modern prose, 1000 pages. 

4 hours. 

14. Fourth Year German. 

Classical dramas. History of literature. German essays. Col- 
lateral reading of modern prose. 4 hours. 

GREEK 

COLLEGE 

11. First Year Greek. 

The most essential facts of the language; daily exercises in 
forms; the acquiring of a fair working vocabulary. The amount 
of work done is equivalent to the first fifty lessons in White's 
First Greek Book. 5 hours. 

12. First Year Greek. 

Course 11 continued. One book of the Anabasis carefully 
studied with special reference to mastery of forms and the fun- 
damental constructions. 5 hours. 

13. Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Books II — III of the Anabasis. The elements of Greek syntax 
studied in connection with the reading of the text, together with 
one exercise each week in Greek prose composition. 5 hours. 

14. (1) Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Continuation of course 13. Book IV of the Anabasis. 

(2) Homer. 

Introduction to the Epic dialect and to the Homeric hexameter. 
Books I and II of the Iliad or Odyssey. 5 hours. 

15. Homer. 

Continuation of course 14 (2). Books III — VI of the Iliad or 
their equivalent. 4 hours. 

16. Plato. 

The Apology carefully read, with a rapid reading of as many 
of the minor dialogs as time will permit. 4 hours. 

17a. Oratory. 

Representative orations of Lysias and Demosthenes. 2 — 4 hours. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 35 

17b. Tragedy. 

Introduction to Greek tragedy, Euripides' Alcestis or Sophocles' 
Antigone. Outlines of history of Greek literature with special 
reference to the origin and development of the drama. 

2 — 4 hours. 
17c. Hellenistic Greek. 

Critical study of the Greek of this period; rapid reading of 
some of the historical portions of the New Testament or the 
Septuagint and careful study of some of the Pauline epistles. 

2 — 4 hours. 
Note. Courses 17a, 17b, 17c will be given in alternate years 
or at the option of the class. 

18a. History. 

Selections from Thucydides and Herodotus. 2 — 4 hours. 

18b. Advanced Course in Tragedy. 

Rapid reading of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
Euripides. 2 — 4 hours. 

18c. Hellenistic Greek. 

Continuation of course 17c. 2 — 4 hours. 

Note. Courses 18a, 18b, and 18c will be given in alternate years 
or at the option of the class. 

HISTORY 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Elementary Course in United States History. 

Course 1 is devoted to the Colonial Period and Course 2 to the 
National. The text-book and recitations are supplemented by 
lectures and blackboard illustrations on which the students take 
notes. Each course 5 hours. 

ACADEMY 
3 and 4. History of United States and Illinois. 

This is a thoro course arranged for those who expect to teach 
in the public schools. Course 4 includes the History of Illinois. 

Each course 3 hours. 

5. History of the Eastern Nations and Ggeece. 

Only a short outline is given of the Eastern Nations. The 
greater part of the course is devoted to Greek History. Recita- 
tions, lectures, blackboard illustrations, map study, collateral 
reading, indicate the method used in all the courses in History. 
Each student is also required to make an outline of the entire 
course. 5 hours. 



36 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

6. Roman History. 

This course covers the period from the founding of the city 
to the fall of Rome, 476 A. D. Special attention is given to the 
constitutional and political development of the Roman state. 

4 hours. 

COLLEGE 

13. Medieval Europe. 

This course begins with the barbarian invasions and extends 
to the Reformation. Special topics of study are the Origin of 
the European Nations, the Hierarchy, Feudalism, and the Renais- 
sance. On these and other topics at least one paper is required 
of each student. 4 hours. 

14. Modern History of Europe. 

The course covers the period from the Reformation to the end 
of the XlXth Century. Each student is required to prepare a 
paper on some topic in the course. 4 hours. 

15. History of the Eastern Nations. 

The course includes the History of Babylonia and Assyria and 
of Ancient Egypt. Goodspeed and Breasted are studied as texts. 

3 hours. 

16. Classical History. 

The course consists of the History of Greece and Rome, studied 
alternate years. Bury's History is used in Greek and Pelham's 
in Roman History. 3 hours. 

17. Constitutional History of England. 

The course begins with the study of the Teutonic peoples and 
their institutions. Special attention is given to the Anglo-Saxon 
period in tracing the origin of the English Constitution. Leading 
topics of study are the Great Charter, the Rise and Evolution of 
the House of Commons, Cabinet Government, etc. Here, too, a 
paper on some topic in the course is required of each student. 

4 hours. 

18. Constitutional and Political History of the United States. 

The course covers three periods: a) The Colonial Period. 
Lines of study are the development of political ideas in the new 
environments, New England and Virginia types of local govern- 
ment, the English and American view of representation, etc. b) 
The Critical or Formative Period. Lines of study: the Forma- 
tion of the Union, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitu- 
tion, the Origin of Parties, c) The National Period. Lines of 
study: the Growth of Nationality, Territorial Expansion, the 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 37 

Slavery Controversy, Secession, Civil War, Reconstruction, Trust 
Problems, the Monroe Doctrine. At least one paper is required 
of each student. 4 hours. 

LATIN 
ACADEMY 

3. First Year Latin. 

Daily recitations from a text-book. Special emphasis laid on 
forms, vocabularies, essentials of grammar, and correct pro- 
nunciation. 5 hours. 

4. First Year Latin. 

Continuation of Course 3. Reading of connected prose. Vo- 
cabulary of about 500 words. 5 hours. 

5. Caesar. 

Rapid review of Forms. Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles. Especial 
attention will be given to vocabularies. Grammar and compo- 
sition. 5 hours. 

6. Caesar. 

Commentaries, four books. Grammar and composition. Read- 
ing at sight; drill in vocabularies; memorizing of brief passages 
of text. Walker's Caesar will be used. 5 hours. 

7. Cicero. 

Two orations of Cicero. Review of forms; vocabularies; exer- 
cises in grammar and composition. Sight reading. 5 hours. 

8. Cicero and Ovid. 

Three orations of Cicero. Reading at sight. Ovid's Metamor- 
phoses, about one thousand lines. Essentials of prosody and 
scansion; grammar and composition continued. 5 hours. 

9. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, two books. Introduction to epic poetry; prosody 
reviewed; scansion of text read; grammar and composition; 
translation at sight. 5 hours. 

10. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, four books. Grammar and composition. Outlines 
of classical mythology. Translation at sight. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Cicero and Livy. 

The Be Senectute or Be Amicitia of Cicero. Selections from 
Livy, about thirty pages. Exercises in composition. 4 hours. 



38 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

12. LlYY. 

Selections from Livy, about one hundred pages. Reading at 
sight. Composition. 4 hours. 

13. Hoe ace. 

Selections from the Epodes; the Odes, two books or equivalent. 
Study of lyric metres. 3 hours. 

13a. Composition. 

Writing of paragraphs of connected discourse. 1 hour. 

14. Tacitus. 

The lesser works of Tacitus, the Dialogus de Oratoribus. the 
Germania, and the Agricola. 3 hours. 

14a. Composition. 

Continuation of Course 13a. 1 hour. 

15. Letters of Cicero. Rapid reading course. 2 hours. 

16. Roman Comedy. 

The Rudens, the Captivi. and the Trinummus of Plautus. Ro- 
man Scenic antiquities. 2 hours. 

16 a. Review. 

Rapid review of essentials with especial reference to needs of 
those preparing to teach Latin. Prerequisite, at least one year 
of college Latin. 2 hours. 

17. Histoey of Roman Litebatube. 

Reading of representative selections; reports. 2 hours. 

18. Histoey of Roman Literature. 

Continuation of Course 17. 2 hours. 

Note. Of the college courses outlined above, courses 11, 12, 15, 16, 

17 and 18 will be offered during 1916—17. 

Students desiring a recommendation to teach Latin should complete 
with high standing at least two years of College Latin. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 
COLLEGE 
12. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work designed to give stu- 
dents systematic instruction in proper use of libraries. Course 
includes work in the following subjects: library methods; classi- 
fication, cataloging; book-binding and care of books; elementary 
book selection; general indexes; elementary reference; public 
documents; note-taking; investigation of a topic in a library; 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 39 

bibliography. By problems and other assigned work the student 
is brought in actual contact with the books and methods of the 
library. 3 hours. 

LOGIC 

See Philosophy. 

MATHEMATICS 
PREPARATORY 

1. Arithmetic. 

Review of fundamental rules and of fractions; compound num- 
bers, including the metric system. 5 hours. 

2. Arithmetic. 

Percentage; interest; ratio and proportion; involution and 
evolution; mensuration. 5 hours. 

ACADEMY 

3. Algebra. 

Fundamental rules, including synthetic division; factoring; 
common factors and multiples. 5 hours. 

4. Algebra. 

Fractions; equations containing fractions; systems of equa- 
tions; graphic solution of equations; involution and evolution; 
logarithms; quadratic equations. 5 hours. 

5. Plane Geometry. 

Rectilinear figures and the circle ; ratio and proportion ; similar 
figures — three books. 4 hours. 

6. Plane Geometry. 

Areas of polygons and circles; regular polygons and circles — 
two books. 5 hours. 

7. Advanced Algebra. 

Review of quadratic equations, the graph, and logarithms; 
progression; compound interest and annuities; the binominal 
theorem; ratio and proportion; indeterminate equations. 

4 hours. 

8. Solid and Spherical Geometry. 

Lines and planes in space; polyhedrons, cylinders, cones, and 
the sphere. 4 hours. 

9. 10. Normal Arithmetic. 

A thoro review of Arithmetic arranged for prospective teach- 
ers. Definite methods for teaching are presented. Emphasis 
is laid upon Percentage and Mensuration. Each course 2 hours. 



40 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

11a. College Algebba. 

The quadratic equation; systems of equations; progressions; 
and variation reviewed. 

Complex numbers; permutations and combinations; the bi- 
nominal theorem; theory of equations; inequalities; partial 
fractions; logarithms; and infinite series. 3 hours. 

lib. Plane Tbigonometby. 

The trigonometric functions; solution of right-angled triangles; 
trigonometric functions of sums, differences, and multiples of 
angles; solutions of triangles in general; trigonometric equa- 
tions. 4 hours. 

12a. Analytical Geometby. 

Rectilinear and polar coordinates; the curve and the equation; 
the straight line; transformation of coordinates; the circle, conic 
sections and the general equation of the second degree; tangents 
and normals; poles and polars; some higher plane curves. 

Geometry of space; coordinates; surfaces, curves, and equa- 
tions; transformations of coordinates; the plane; the straight 
line; quadric surfaces. 5 hours. 

12b. Elemextaby Analysis. 

An introductory course to analytic geometry and calculus. 

4 hours. 
For Descriptive Geometry see Drawing 12. 

13a and 14a. Diffebential and Integbal Calculus. 

Functions and limits; differentiation of algebraic and trans- 
cendental functions; successive differentiation; maxima and min- 
ima; tangents and normals; partial differentiation; curvature; 
evolutes and involutes; envelopes; asymptotes; singular points; 
curve tracing; Taylor's theorem; integration of algebraic and 
trigonometric functions; rectification of curves; areas of plane 
and curved surfaces; volumes of solids; applications to geometry 
and physics. Each course 4 hours. 

15a and 16a. Diffebential Equations. 

Prerequisites: Courses 13a and 14a. Each course 2 hours. 

15b and 16b. Theoby of Equations. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11a, 12a, or 12b. Each course 2 hours. 

Of the following courses only one is offered each term. 

14b. Subveying. 

Elementary course in land surveying; use of tape, compass, 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 



41 



level, and transit. Recitations, field work, and drawing. (Usu- 



ally four hours of field work and drawing.) 

17a. Projective Geometry. 

Prerequisite: Course 12a. 

17b. Analytical Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Courses 12a, 13a, 14a. 



2 credits. 

3 hours. 

3 hours. 
3 hours. 

3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours. 



17c Advanced Calculus. 

18a. Differential Geometry. 

Prerequisites: Courses 12a, 13a, 14a. 

18b. Continuation of Course 17b. 

18c. Continuation of Course 17c 

METEOROLOGY 

See Geology. 

MINERALOGY 

See Geology. 

MUSIC 

See Conservatory of Music. 

PEDAGOGY 

ACADEMY 
9. This is a practical course in the theory of teaching and the art of 
school management. It consists of lessons from text-book, notes, 
lectures and an explanation of the Illinois State Course of Study. 

5 hours. 
PHILOSOPHY 
11. Elementary Psychology. 

Study of text-book. Lectures. Practical applications to ped- 
agogy and human life. 3 hours. 

13. The Liquor Problem. 

Papers and class discussions on various phases of Alcoholism. 

1 hour. 

14. The Liquor Problem. 

Continuation of Course 13. 1 hour. 



17a. Logic. 

Elements of deductive logic. Use of text-book. 



2 hours. 



17b. Sociology. 

Use of text-book. Lectures. Study of social problems. Theses 
on assigned topics. 2 hours. 



42 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

17c. Esthetics. 

Text-book on the elements of Esthetics. Lectures. Practical 
exercises in Art analysis. Study of pictures, statues, buildings, 
landscapes, etc. 2 hours. 

18a. Psychology. 

Use of two or more text-books. Lectures. The work includes 
two parallel courses, one a free treatment of the subject, the other 
technical. Reports on assigned collateral reading. 4 hours. 

18b. Ethics. 

Study of text-book. Lectures. Discussions of ethical questions. 
Reports on supplementary reading. 2 hours. 

18c. Histoby of Philosophy. 

Text-book on the general history of philosophy. Lectures. 

3 hours. 
PHONETICS AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS 
COLLEGE 

15. The Physiology of speech sounds with applications to various lan- 

guages. General Linguistics. 2 hours. 

16. Continuation of Course 15. 2 hours. 

PHYSICS 

For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 

9 and 10. Elementary Physics. 

Three hours each week are given to lectures or recitations, and 
two periods, two hours each, to laboratory work. In the class- 
room the work consists in lecture demonstrations and recitations 
from a text-book. In the laboratory a course of experiments, 
parallel to the work in the class-room, is performed and reported 
under the supervision of an instructor. About 100 experiments 
are performed and reported in writing by each student during 
the year. The first term covers Mechanics and Heat; the second, 
Electricity, Sound, and Light. The course is intended to give a 
general knowledge of the subject and to prepare for more ad- 
vanced work. Each course 5 credits. 

COLLEGE 
15. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat. 

Prerequisites: Physics 9 and 10. Two hours lectures and two 
periods, two hours each, laboratory work. The course consists 
in a series of precision measurements, the theory of each experi- 
ment being fully developed in the class-room. A knowledge of 
Trigonometry is required for this course. 4 credits. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 43 

15a. Problems in Physics. 

One hour per week is given to problem work in Physics. The 
course is designed to accompany Course 15. 1 credit. 

16. Electricity, Sound and Light. 

This course is a continuation of Course 15. 4 credits. 

16a. Problems in Physics. 

Similar to 15a. 1 credit. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY 
See Geology. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

See Biology. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 
ACADEMY 
7. Civil Government. 

The first half of the course is devoted to the study of the 
general government and the Constitution of the United States; 
the second half to the study of local and state government. 

5 hours. 
COLLEGE 

17. Money and Banking. 

The first part of this course consists of a study of Money and 
credit. The second part includes a study of the Principles of 
Banking, Banking in the U. S. and Foreign Banking Systems. 
Each student is required to prepare and read a paper on some 
topic in the course. 4 hours. 

18. Political Economy. 

The first part of the course is devoted to the principles of 
Political Economy, and the second part to the discussion of the 
questions relating to the practical application of these principles. 
Special topics of study are Socialism, Taxation, Free Trade and 
Protection, Banking, Labor and Wages, Trusts, etc. Each stu- 
dent is required to prepare a paper on some economic subject. 

4 hours. 
PSYCHOLOGY 
See Philosophy. 

SWEDISH 

ACADEMY 
3. Elementary Swedish. 

Brief introductory survey of etymology, using Vikner's Swedish 
Grammar. Reading of about 100 pages of prose. Translation 



44 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 



from Swedish into English and from English into Swedish. 
Constant practise in pronunciation. 3 hours. 



Elementary Swedish. 

Continuation of Course 3. 



3 hours. 



Second Year Swedish. 

a. Reading of 250 pages of prose. Orthography. Written 
exercises each week. 2 hours. 

b. Elements of Grammar, using Sunden's Svensk sprdkliira. 
Special study of nouns and verbs. Particular stress on principal 
parts of verbs, plural forms and genders of nouns, and com- 
parison of adjectives. Blackboard exercises. 3 hours. 

Third Year Swedish. 

a. Reading of 100 pages of prose and of Funrik Stdls siigner. 
Orthography. Final review of Rdttskrivningslara. Written exer- 
cises each week. 2 hours. 

b. Analysis of sentences. Syntax. Punctuation. Review of 
etymology. Blackboard exercises. 3 hours. 



9 and 10. Theme Writing. 

Weekly Themes. Letter writing. 
Swedish. 



Translation of English into 
Each course 1 hour. 



COLLEGE 



11a. Swedish History. 

Geography of Sweden. 



History of Sweden to 1611. 



4 hours. 



lib and 12b. 

Swedish Grammar. Orthography. Translations from Swedish 

into English and from English into Swedish. Reading of 300 

pages of prose. 

These courses are intended especially for those who enter College 

without having studied Swedish. To those who have taken Swedish 

in the Academy they also furnish an opportunity to review the subject 

of grammar. Each course 2 hours. 



12a. Swedish History. 

History of Sweden from 1611. 



See lib 
14. 



Art of Composition. 

Stillara. Practical exercises in making outlines. 
Grammar. Themes. 



4 hours. 



Advanced 
4 hours. 



15. History of Swedish Literature. 

Text-book work and lectures on Swedish literature from the 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 45 

earliest times to 1772. Study of authors. 4 hours. 

16. History of Swedish Literature. 

Text-book work and lectures on Swedish literature dealing with 
the periods after 1772. Study of authors. 4 hours. 

17a. Modern Literature. 

Lectures. Study of authors. Writing of Theses. Class dis- 
cussions. 2 hours. 

17b. Danish. 

Study of the Danish language and literature and of Holberg's, 
Oehlenschlager's, and some modern authors' works. 2 hours. 

18a. Philological Studies, Mythology. 

Text-book work. Lectures. 2 hours. 

18b. Norwegian. 

Study of the Norwegian language and literature and of some 
of Bjornson's and Ibsen's works. 2 hours. 

ZOOLOGY 

See Biology. 



46 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



All students are required to attend divine service at least once every 
Sunday; and also the daily Chapel exercises, unless excused by the 
President. 

Students entering a class at any time subsequent to the first hour of 
a term in that subject will be reported absent by the instructor, and 
must account to the committee on absences, for all the hours lost by 
such delay in entering. While this rule is not enforced in the case of 
students entering the institution for the first time, such students will 
find it very much to their interest to be on hand on Registration day, 
as work in all classes begins he first day of the term. 

Certificates of standing are given at the end of each term. 

The standing of students in each subject is marked on a scale of 100, 
the minimum limit for passing in each subject being 60, and the aver- 
age 80. 

Mid-term reports concerning the conduct and progress in study of the 
younger students are sent to their parents or guardians on request. 
Also, without request, in cases where the faculty deems such reports 
desirable. 

Any student whose standing and progress in any subject are not 
satisfactory to the teacher may be dropped at any time during the term. 

Attendance upon instruction in the undergraduate courses is re- 
quired. Deviations from this rule are allowed only under exceptional 
circumstances. Should any student wish to earn credits by private 
work and examination, he must submit a petition to this effect to the 
faculty thru the enrolling officer. The faculty will not, however, grant 
any such petition unless it is accompanied by the recommendation of 
the professor in charge of the department concerned, and unless the 
petitioner has earned an average standing of at least 85 for the term 
last preceding. The minimum grade for approval in the examination 
is also 85 per cent. 

Professional men who have not completed the College course but 
desire to do so by non-resident study are generally accorded this priv- 
ilege, but at least one year of resident study is required for the 
degree of A. B. 

Resident study on the part of seniors thruout the year is, as a rule, 
required. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 47 



GRADUATION 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Board of Direc- 
tors on such persons as have satisfactorily completed all the prescribed 
work, as well as the required amount of elective work, in any of the 
six groups of the College curriculum, in all 120 credits, to which must 
be added the required credits in gymnastics. A diploma fee of five 
dollars is charged. 



POSTGRADUATE COURSES 



The institution offers no graduate instruction in Arts and Sciences, 
but those wishing to pursue a course of study leading to the degree 
of Master of Arts may do so on the following conditions: 

1. Only those who have received a Bachelor's degree from this or 
some other institution of equal rank, and who sustain a good moral 
character, are eligible candidates. 

2. In average cases it is expected that two years' time will be re- 
quired to complete the course. 

3. The subjects pursued shall be a major and a minor, together 
with a thesis on some subject in connection with the major study. 

The amount of work required in the major subject exclusive of the 
thesis shall be equivalent to the work done in a subject to which six 
weekly recitations are devoted thruout an entire academic year (12 
credits). Similarly, the amount of work required in the minor subject 
shall be equivalent to the work done in a subject to which four weekly 
recitations thruout the year are devoted (8 credits). The amount of 
work required on the thesis shall be equivalent to the amount required 
in a subject to which five weekly recitations thruout the year are de- 
voted (10 credits). As a rule a candidate must select only one minor 
study, but by special permission of the faculty he may be allowed to 
take two half-minors. 

These courses are under the immediate direction of a committee of 
the faculty, consisting of the professors in charge of the departments 
to which the subjects chosen belong. 

4. The candidate is required to present himself at the College, for 
final examination, at least one week before Commencement. The 
examination may be taken in instalments at the discretion of the pro- 
fessor in charge of the department. 

5. The candidate must submit his thesis to the faculty by the first 
of May prior to his graduation, the theme having been reported to the 



48 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

faculty for approval at least six months before the presentation of the 
thesis. This thesis, which is to disclose as much original research as 
possible, may be publicly read and defended* by the author at a time 
and place appointed for that purpose. It shall be carefully examined 
by each professor under whom the candidate shall have pursued his 
studies, and upon recommendation of this committee shall be accepted 
or rejected by the faculty. At least two bound copies of the thesis, 
which must be typewritten or printed, shall be deposited in the College 
Library. 

6. Applicants may select their subjects from the following depart- 
ments: 

1. Astronomy. 

2. Biology. 

3. Chemistry. 

4. English Language and Literature. 

5. Geology. 

6. German Language and Literature. 

7. Greek Language and Literature. 

8. History. 

9. Latin Language and Literature. 

10. Mathematics. 

11. Philosophy. 

12. Physics. 

13. Political Science. 

14. Romance Languages and Literatures. 

15. Swedish Language and Literature. 

7. The course for the Master's degree is considered a continuation 
of the course for the Bachelor's degree, and hence professional studies 
are not allowed in this course. 

8. Applicants are limited in their choice of subjects to those branches 
of study for which instruction is provided in the several established 
Collegiate departments. 

9. College elective courses not already applied on the A. B. degree 
may be credited for the Master's degree. In case subjects are chosen 
which are not required in the regular College courses of undergraduate 
study, the applicant must show a fair acquaintance with the rudiments 
of such subjects. 

10. A fee of twenty-five dollars is charged for the diploma and 
examinations, which fee must be paid prior to the examination. There 
is also a registration fee of ten dollars, which must be paid at the 
time of registration. 

11. Each candidate shall report progress to the Secretary of the 
faculty not later than the first of February of each year. 

12. For further information, see Pamphlet on Postgraduate Courses, 
a copy of which may be had on application to the President. 



NOBMAL DEPARTMENT 49 

Normal Department 

The requirements of the Illinois Teachers' Certificating law for second 
grade certificates, first grade certificates, high school teachers' certifi- 
cates, and special certificates may be met by taking courses offered in 
Augustana College. The provisions of the law applying to students 
of this institution are as follows: 

Second Grade Certificates. A second grade certificate may be granted 
without examination to those who have completed a one-year course 
in a recognized higher institution of learning, and have earned credits 
as follows: 

Table I. 

English 6 semester hours 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours 

Education (Educational Psychology, History of Edu- 
cation, School Administration or Principles and 

Methods of Teaching) 6 semester hours 

Electives , 6 semester hours 

Total 30 semester hours 

First Grade Certificates. A first grade certificate shall be issued 
without examination to those who have completed a two-year course 
in a recognized higher institution of learning and have earned credits 
as follows: 

Table II. 

English 6 semester hours 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours 

Education (Educational Psychology, History of Edu- 
cation, School Administration or Principles and 

Methods of Teaching) 6 semester hours 

Practise Teaching 6 semester hours 

Electives 30 semester hours 

Total 60 semester hours 

An applicant under either of the above conditions must have com- 
pleted the course within three years of the time of applying for the 
certificate or must have taught continuously since such completion. 

High School Teachers' Certificates: A high school teachers' certificate 
may be granted without examination to graduates of recognized colleges 



"50 NORMAL DEPARTMENT 

and universities who, within three years after graduation, present certi- 
fied credits in the subjects of examination, accompanied by faculty 
recommendation of ability to teach in the high school. 

Requirements for County High School Teachers' Certificate. 

(a) Graduation from a recognized normal school or college. 

(b) Faculty recommendation of ability to teach in the high school. 

(c) Certified credits for: 

8 semester hours in English. 

6 semester hours in education. 

3 majors of not less than 16 semester hours each in three high 

school subjects or groups of related subjects. 
3 minors of not less than 8 semester hours each in three high 

school subjects. 

(d) Electives sufficient to make up the remaining number of 120 
semester hours for graduation. 

When an applicant has had secondary or high school work in any 
subject which is offered as a major or a minor and such secondary 
work is the necessary prerequisite for the college or normal school work 
which is offered, the same may be counted in making the majors and 
minors, but shall not be counted in making the total number of semester 
hours required. 

Algebra and geometry may be combined to form a major. 

Any of the following biological sciences may be combined to form a 
major; botany, zoology, physiology. 

Physics and chemistry may be combined to form a major. 

Two or more history courses may be combined to form a major. 

Mechanical drawing and manual training may be combined to form 
a major. 

Domestic art and domestic science may be combined to form a major. 

Stenography and typewriting may be combined to form a major. 

Special Certificates: A special certificate authorizing the holder to 
teach and supervise the subject or subjects named in the certificate may 
be isssued without examination to an applicant who presents the 
following: 

(a) Evidence of graduation from a recognized four-year high school, 
or an equivalent preparation. 

(b) A certificate showing the completion in a recognized higher in- 
stitution of at least two years of special training in the subject or sub- 
jects named in the certificate. 

(c) Credits for eight semester hours in English and six semester 
hours in Education (see tables I and II). 

(d) Satisfactory evidence that the applicant has taught or can teach 
successfully the subject or subjects named in the certificate. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 51 



The Theological Seminary 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. 0., 

President. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D. D., R. N. 0., 

Professor of Biblical Theology, Church History, Symbolics, Pastoral Theology and Swedish 

Homiletics. 1 ) 

Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D. D., LL. D., R. N. 0., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Hermeneutics, Liturgies, Apologetics and Church Polity. 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph. D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, Old Testament Introduction, and Evangelistics. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A. M., 

Professor of Philosophy, New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Introduction, and 

Catechetics. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B. D., 

Professor of Biblical Theology, Church History, Symbolics, Pastoral Theology, and 

ProDedeutics. 



ADMISSION AND MATRICULATION 
The Theological Seminary prepares students for the ministry of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, with the special needs of the Augustana 
Synod in view. And the faithful and efficient service of the Synod 
requires that its pastors receive their training at its own Seminary. 
The spirit of loyalty, solidarity and devotedness, knowledge of im- 
portant detail, interest in the work and faith in the mission of the 
Synod are necessary qualifications with which the Seminary aims to 
equip and imbue its candidates for the ministry. A full classical course 
is regarded as constituting a normal preparation for the Seminary. 
The rule, therefore, is that all candidates for admission as regular 
students in the Seminary must be graduates of a recognized College, 
the courses of which must have included: Swedish, English, German, 
Latin and Greek according to the following requirements: 

1. Swedish: For candidates who intend to serve Swedish congrega- 
tions all required courses in Academy and College according to Clas- 
sical Course B. Candidates for English work are excused from College 
Swedish. 

J ) During Fall term. 



52 THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 

2. English: a) For candidates who intend to serve Swedish congre- 
gations all required courses in Academy and College according to 
Classical Course B, or an equivalent. 

b) For candidates in exclusively English work all required courses 
in Academy and College according to Classical Course A. 

3. German: Two years German. 

4. Latin: Two years Latin. 

5. Greek: Two years Greek. 

All applications for admission to the Seminary should be presented 
before the first day of September, or if possible by the first of June, 
of the school year; all such applications to be sent to the President 
or to the Secretary of the Faculty, Prof. C. J. Sodergren, 1010 — 38 St., 
Rock Island, 111. 

Each applicant who is a graduate of any of the colleges of the Synod 
will present to the Matriculation Committee, consisting of the Theolo- 
gical Faculty and the President of the Synod, the following documents: 

1. A formal application for admission to the Seminary. 

2. A brief biography and explicit statement of the motives which 
induce him to devote his life to the ministry of the gospel. 

3. A certificate of graduation. 

4. A statement of all the College credits. 

5. Satisfactory testimonials from the authorities of the institution 
previously attended as to the candidate's Christian character and 
practical ability, and 

6. Certificate of membership in a Lutheran church, together with 
recommendations from the pastor of the applicant. 

Students from other colleges must furnish statements of equivalent 
value and character. 

The committee on matriculation will hold a colloquium with the new 
applicants during the first week of the scholastic year, in the third 
week in September. If the students arrive later, they cannot be 
matriculated before the "beginning of the following scholastic year. 

Each course of study extends thru one full year or more. 

COURSES 

The whole plan of instruction is divided into twenty-one distinct 
courses as specified in the catalog. The classes have from one to five 
lectures and recitations a week in each course. The courses cover all 
the important subjects taught in the best theological seminaries of our 
Church and aim to equip students properly for the ministry. The 
student must pass oral or written examinations in these twenty-one 
courses to become a graduate of the Seminary. 

Altho several of the courses are elective as to order, the students 
are recommended to study according to the following plan: Junior 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY BS 

year: I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, XIa; Middle year: Villa, IXa, X, Xlb, 
Xllla, XIV, XVIIa, XVIII; Senior year: XIc, XII, XHIb, XV, XVI, 
XVIIb, XIX, XX. 

No student is allowed to enter the Senior class unless he has passed 
satisfactory examinations in the preceding courses. 

The peculiar plan of this Institution forbids the admission ad eundem 
gradum of students who have taken part of a course at other semina- 
ries or universities. But a student, in addition to the courses which he 
has selected, may offer for examination whatever subject he has previ- 
ously mastered. No one, however, can be granted the B. D. degree 
unless he has been a regular resident student for the number of years 
the regulations and courses require. As a rule, all students should 
take a full three years' course at this seminary. 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity, B. D., is the standard of gradu- 
ation from our Seminary and this degree is granted to all regular 
students who are Bachelors of Arts, and who with decided credit have 
completed all the courses of the Seminary, presented the thesis as 
required, 1 ) and been duly approved by the professors in charge of the 
subject and by the Faculty. 

Graduates with the S. M. degree may later receive the B. D. degree if 
by examinations in all subjects required, they raise their testimonials 
according to preceding conditions and write the thesis. 

In order to give time for review no final examinations are held with 
the Junior and Middle classes before May 15. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 
I. THEOLOGICAL PROPEDEUTICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course gives a general survey of all the theological sciences. 
Philip Schaff's Theological Propedeutic is used as a text-book and 
Heinrici's Encyklopadie as reference book. 

II. PHILOSOPHY 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

This course embraces Introduction to Philosophy, History of Philo- 
sophy, and Philosophy of Religion. The instruction is given by lec- 
tures based upon outlines and text-books. In the Junior year Intro- 
duction to Philosophy is offered during the Fall term and History of 
Philosophy during the Spring term; the Philosophy of Religion is 
presented in the Middle year. 

J ) Candidates for the B. D. degree should select their subjects for the thesis and have 
them approved by the Faculty during the Spring term of the Middle year, and be ready to 
submit the thesis not later than February 1st of the Senior year. The subject may be 
chosen from the Exegetical, the Historical, or the Systematic departments. 



54 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Text-looks and Books of Reference: A syllabus on the whole course 
by the professor. Jerusalem's Introduction to Philosophy; Ladd's 
Philosophy of Religion; Thilly's History of Philosophy, and Pontus 
Wikner's Filosofiens historia, utgifven af S. G. Youngert. 

III. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This subject is offered during the Junior year and embraces intro- 
duction to Dogmatics, Ethics, and Apologetics. Instruction is given 
by recitations and lectures. Students are required either to present 
written answers to questions in the text-book or a typewritten essay 
on some of the more important topics. 

Text-Book: Weidner's Introduction to Dogmatic Theology. 

Books of Reference: Introductions in standard works of Systematic 
Theology. 

IV. ELEMENTARY HEBREW 3 hours. 

The work in Hebrew during the Junior year covers the fifty lessons in 
Harper's Method and Manual and Elements of the Hebrew Grammar. 
Additional chapters in Genesis are translated. A working vocabulary 
is memorized. A written examination is required on the Hebrew 
paradigms and some selected passage for translation. 

The text-books used are Harper's Hebrew Method and Manual, 
Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Kittel's Hebrew Bible, and some standard 
Hebrew Dictionary. 

V. GREEK JUNIOR 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

The regular studies in this department embrace the reading and 
explication of the four Gospels and the Acts. A written examination 
is required on such part or parts of these books as the professor may 
assign. The N. T. Syntax is reviewed. 

Text-Books: Tischendorf's, Westcott-Hort's, Nestle's, or Palmer's 
Greek Testament; Thayer's Greek-English Lexicon is recommended and 
Buttmann's Grammar of New Testament Greek is used. 

Books of Reference: Burton's Syntax of the Moods and Tenses in 
New Testament Greek; Robertson's Short Grammar of the Greek New 
Testament; Thayer's New Testament Greek Lexicon. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY 
VI. BIBLICAL INTRODUCTION 

a) Old Testament 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

The General Introduction to the Old Testament embraces the subjects 
of the canon, the original languages of Scripture, textual criticism, and 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 55 

principles of Scriptural interpretation. The Special Introduction deals 
with the authorship, integrity, design and structure of the individual 
books of the Bible; it also takes account of the contents and critical 
problems of each book. 

Text-book: A short Introduction to the Old Testament by P. Ernest 
Spencer. 

Besides the class room instruction students prepare papers on topics 
assigned by the professor, and these papers are read and dicussed in 
the class. 

b) History of Israel 1 hour. 

This course is given by lectures, which the students copy. Discussions 
of important historical data take place in the class at most of the 
lectures given. The Mosaic era has been studied during 1915 — 1916. 

New Testament 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Lectures on the philological and historical apparatus for New Testa- 
ment exegesis and text-criticism, and on the canon of the New Testa- 
ment, using Hammond's Textual Criticism; M'Clymont's The New 
Testament and Its Writers (8vo ed.); Zahn's Introduction to New 
Testament and Gregory's Canon and Text of the New Testament. One 
hour is devoted to a course in the English Bible (N. T.). 

VII. HERMENEUTICS, THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

In this course, offered during the Junior year, the principles of the 
interpretation of the Bible are taught and applied. Lectures are de- 
livered on theory and also on the application by illustrations in Exe- 
gesis. Each student is required to write an essay to prove his ability 
in applying the principles and this essay is also discussed and criticized 
in the class-room. 

Text-Books: Hermeneutics by J. E. Cellerier or Outlines in vol. I of 
Weidner's Theological Encyclopedia; Notes on the Parables by Trench; 
The Miracles of our Lord by Laidlaw. 

Books of Reference: Standard Commentaries. 

VIII. ADVANCED HEBREW 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

a. Middle Year. 
Several historical books are read during the year, besides some 
psalms and some of the minor prophets. The word lists are reviewed, 
as well as the main parts of the Hebrew grammar. A final examina- 
tion is required on the wordlists and on translation of some assigned 
Hebrew text. 



56 THEOLOGICAL SEMI> T ABY 

b. Senior Year. 

The Senior year is not a language course, but a course in Old Testa- 
ment Exegesis, when one of the major prophets or Deuteronomy is 
studied exegetically. All the principles of Hermeneutics are applied 
to the Hebrew text, and all the doctrinal and critical points involved 
are carefully and thoroly discussed. 

A written examination is required at the end of the course. During 
1915—1916 Isaiah has been studied. 

IX. GREEK MIDDLE AND SENIOR, AND NEW TESTAMENT 

EXEGESIS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOB SODEBGBEN 

This division embraces the reading and explication of the Greek 
Testament from Acts to Revelation with Boise's, Weiss's or similar notes 
on the Pauline Epistles. Written examinations are required and exe- 
getical notes on some portion of the New Testament may be presented 
by the student in proof of scholarship. 

Text-Books: Tischendorfs Editio Octava Critica Minor of the Greek 
New Testament or J. M. S. Baljon's Novum Testamentum Graece. 

Books of Reference: The Septuagint; Blass's or Winer's Grammar of 
New Testament Greek; Thayer's New Testament Greek Lexicon; and 
standard commentaries. 

X. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PBOFESSOB HULT 

This course is presented in a series of lectures given by the professor 
and the required examinations must be passed. 

Lectures are offered on the Person and Teachings of Christ; The 
Petrine Teaching; Paulinism; the Teaching of John. 

Books of Reference: B. Weiss's Biblical Theology of the New Testa- 
ment; C. F. Schmid's Biblical Theology of the New Testament; Paul 
Feine: Theologie des Neuen Testaments. 

XI. CHURCH HISTORY 6 hours. 

PBOFESSOB HULT 

This course is offered during all the three years and embraces the 
entire Church History. A careful study of the text-books is required. 
Lectures are delivered on the most prominent epochs and events. The 
history of the American Churches is given in a special series of lectures. 
Students must pass either oral or written examinations. 

Text-Books: Kurtz's Church History; Cornelius's Svenska Kyrkans 
Historia; Neve's History of the Lutheran Church in America. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 57 

XII. SYMBOLICS AND CONFESSIONS 2 hours. 

PEOFESSOE HULT 

A careful study of the text-books is required. A course of lectures 
is also given by the professor on the Confession of the Reformed 
Churches and Sects in America. Examinations must be offered. 

Text-Books: Forsander's Den Oforandrade Augsburgiska bekannel- 
sen; Bensow's Larobok i Symbolik; Concordia Pia (The Edition of the 
Augustana Synod). 

Books of Reference: Von Scheele's Teologisk Symbolik; Jacobs's Book 
of Concord, 2 volumes. 

SYSTEMATICAL THEOLOGY 
XIII. DOGMATICS AND HISTORY OF DOGMAS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOE LINDBEEG 

This course is offered during the Middle and Senior years, but the 
beginning of the course is introduced during the Junior year. 

Course A: Recitations and lectures cover Theology, Anthropology 
and Christology and also the corresponding course in the History of 
Dogmas. 

Course B: Necessary repetitions. Recitations and lectures cover 
Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology and also the 
corresponding course in the History of Dogmas. 

Text-Books: Lindberg's Dogmatik och Dogmhistoria; Schmid's Doc- 
trinal Theology or Jacobs's A Summary of the Christian Faith. 

Books of Reference: Philippi's Glaubenslehre ; Hagenbach's History 
of Dogmas; Seeberg's History of Doctrines; Fisher's History of Doc- 
trine; Krauth's Conservative Reformation. 

XIV. ETHICS AND SOCIOLOGY 2 hours. 

PEOFESSOE LINDBEEG 

This course is offered during the Middle year and covers Theoretical 
and Practical Ethics. Theoretical Ethics is studied by recitations and 
lectures, and Practical Ethics, including Sociology, by lectures based on 
a dictated outline. 

Text-Book: Martensen's Christian Ethics. 

Books of Reference: Luthardt's Kompendium der Teologischen Etik; 
Dorner's System of Christian Ethics; Granfelt's Den kristliga sede- 
laran; A System of Ethics by Paulsen. 

XV. APOLOGETICS 1 hour. 

PEOFESSOE LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Senior year and is given principally 
by lectures. The students are required to write a thesis. 

Text-Books: Outlines of Apologetics by Lindberg; Christlieb's Mod- 
ern Doubt and Christian Belief; Apologetics by Bruce. 



58 THEOLOGICAJL SEMENARY 

Books of Reference: Luthardt's Apologetic Lectures; Steam's Evi- 
dence of the Christian Experience. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
XVI. CATECHETICS, EVAXGELISTICS, AND DIACONICS 2 hours 

PBOFESSOR HLOMGBEN 

In this department special lectures are delivered on the respective 
branches and the prescribed text-books are studied for examination in 
the class. 

Text-Books: Scheele's Kateketik or Gerberding's Catechetics, Pfeiff- 
er's Mission Studies, and the Inner Mission, Ohl. 

Books of Reference: G. Warneck's History of Protestant Missions; 
and Bilder ur Missionshistorien jamte missionshistoriska ofversikter af 
Axel Ihrmark och Anton Karlgren. 

XVII. HOMILETICS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREX 

Senior Tear 
Fry's text-book on Homiletics is used as an outline, with lectures on 
the fundamental principles of preaching. The second term is devoted 
mainly to class preaching and practical exercises. 

XVIII. LITURGICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LIXDBERG 

Liturgies is studied during the Middle year. Instruction is given by 
recitations and lectures. The students are also trained in correct read- 
ing of the liturgy. A professor in the Conservatory instructs in the 
rendering of the musical parts or chanting. 

Text-Book: Ullman's Liturgik. 

XIX. CHURCH POLITY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LIXDBERG 

This course is offered during the Senior year. The course is both 
theoretical and practical, including also instruction in correct keeping 
of Church Records. Written answers to questions based on text-books 
and lectures are required. 

Text-Books: Holmstrom's Kyrkorattslara and Lindberg's Syllabus i 
Kyrkorattslara. 

XX. PASTORAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

Pastoral Theology treats of the care of the congregation, as well as 
of the individual souls. In addition to the text-book, a course of 
lectures is delivered. The final examination covers both text-book and 
lectures. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 59 

Text-Book: Norrby's Laran om Sjalavarden. 

Books of Reference: Pontoppidan's Collegium Pastorale; Kostlin's 
Die Lehre von der Seelsorge. 

XXI. CHURCH MUSIC AND HYMNOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course of lectures aims to give an intelligent grasp of hymning 
and church music as factors of church worship, and on methods of 
obtaining best results. Notes on lectures basis of examination. 



In addition to the above courses theoretical and practical instruction 
is given by the Musical Director in the History of Church Music, the 
Organ and the Choir in the Sanctuary, and the Intoning of the Service. 
Also in Public Speaking by the Teacher of Elocution. These additional 
courses are required and due credit is given. 



POSTGRADUATE COURSES 
For those who wish to continue their theological studies the follow- 
ing courses leading to the degree of candidatus sacrw theologies, C. S. T., 
have been arranged. 

I. INTRODUCTORY 
No. 1. Theological Encyclopedia 

PROFESSOR HULT 

Minor. Study of the inner organization of the Theological Sciences, 
classification of the various departments, the principles and 
methods of the various departments, the principles and methods 
of its disciplines and investigation in regard to its select lit- 
erature. 

No. 2. Introduction to the Study of the Fundamentals of Religion. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Minor 1. The History of Religion: 

a) Origin, universality, development, differentiation and 
criticism of religious values. 

b) The History of some special religion. 
Minor 2. Comparative Religion: 

a) A general survey of the entire field. 

b) Principles of the Science. Its speculative and practical 
value. 

c) Special study of some single religion, such as those of 
India, China, Egypt, the early Semites, Islam, Animism. 



60 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



d) A comparison between related or contiguous religions, 
such as those of Babylonia and the early Hebrews, the 
Romans and the Teutons, Israel and Christianity. 
Minor 3. The Psychology of Religion: 

a) Biblical Psychology. 

b) Analysis of Religious Experience. 
Minor 4. The Philosophy of Religion: 

a) Principles, Problems, and Results. 

b) The Religious Aspect of Philosophy. 

c) Monism and Dualism. 

d) The Philosophy of Theism. 

II. EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY 
No. 3. Old Testament Study and Exegesis. 

PBOFESSOE BLOMGBEN 

Major 1. The history of Israel and the Jews, from the earliest times 
to 135 A. D. 

Major 2. An historical survey of the ancient History of Western Asia, 
with special references to the extra-Biblical sources for 
Hebrew and Jewish History. 

Major 3. Introduction to the Old Testament, its Canon, Interpreta- 
tion, Criticism and Versions. 

Minor 1. The Old Testament Religion. 

Minor 2. Semitic Art and Archeology in their bearing upon the study 
of the Bible. 

Major 4. Hebrew Exegesis — Exegetical and Critical Study of either: 

a) Course: Deuteronomy, Isaiah and Daniel, or 

b) Course: Exodus, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, or 

c) Course: The twelve Minor Prophets, the Psalms and Job. 
Minor 3. Special Elementary Courses in Assyrian, Arabic, Syriac, and 

Biblical Aramaic. 



No. 4. New Testament Greek and Exegesis. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Introduction to the New Testament. 
Major 1. Its Canon, Text, and Versions. 
Minor 1. The need of a new English Version. 
Minor 2. A critical study of the latest Swedish Version. 

The Grammar of the New Testament Greek. 
Major 2. Peculiarities of Syntax. 
Minor 3. The Uses of the Aorist, the Participle, or the Subjunctive 

Mode. 
Minor 4. Synonyms and Word Studies. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



61 



Minor 5. Patristic Greek, as exemplified by one of the early Church 

Fathers. 
Minor 6. History of the New Testament Times. 
Minor 7. Epochs in the Life of Jesus or the Life of Paul. 
Major 3. Greek Exegesis: Critical and Exegetical study of 

a) The Synoptic Gospels or The Acts, or 

b) The Gospel of John, or 

c) The Letter to the Romans, or 

d) The Letter to the Hebrews, or 

e) The Apocalypse. 

III. HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HULT 

No. 5. Church History 

Major 1. History of the Christian Church from its foundation to the 
Middle Ages. 

Major 2. History of the Christian Church during the Middle Ages and 
the Reformation. 

Major 3. History of the Christian Church from the seventeenth cen- 
tury to the present time. 

Major 4. The History of the Church in the United States. 

Minor 1. The Apostolic Age. 

Minor 2. Patristics or a more detailed study of some Church Father. 

Minor 3. The Reformation Period. 

Minor 4. History of the Scandinavian Churches. 

Minor 5. History of the Church in the Nineteenth Century. 

No. 6. Symbolics and Confessions 
Major. Symbolics and Confessions in general and their importance. 
Minor 1. History and analysis of the Lutheran Confessions. 
Minor 2. History and analysis of the Reformed Churches. 

IV. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

No. 7. Dogmatics and History of Dogmas. 
Study of three complete Lutheran systems. Selections may 
be made from systems written in Latin, English, German or 
Swedish. 

Study of three complete non-Lutheran works. Selections 
may be made from systems written in English or German. 
If desirable a non-Lutheran work may be substituted for a 
Lutheran work. 

Research work in one department of dogmatics, the selection 
to be made from one of the seven main divisions: Theology, 



Major 1. 



Major 2. 



Major 3. 



62 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Minor 1. 



Minor 2. 



Major 1. 

Major 2. 

Major 3. 
Minor 1. 

Minor 2. 



Major 1. 



Major 2. 



Minor 1. 



Minor 2. 



Anthropology, Christology, Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ec-I 
clesiology and Eschatology. Or instead of one main divisioL 
a special topic in any division may be chosen, scholarly re- 
search work to be proved by a treatise or thesis on the sub-/ 
ject selected. 

Study of a complete course of History of Dogmas, covering 
all the periods and leading doctrines. In the selection of 
works language will be optional. 

Research work in one of the main periods, covering the 
development of the leading doctrines in such a period. Or 
the student may select one leading doctrine and follow its 
development through all the periods. 

Xo. 8. Ethics and Sociology. 
Study of the History of Ethics, two systems of Christian 
Ethics, and as a comparative course one system of Moral 
Philosophy. 

Study of Social Ethics, Christian Sociology and as a com- 
parative study History of Socialism and Socialism as a 
Science. 

Special research work in the field of Social Ethics and So- 
ciology, the result to be presented in a treatise or thesis. 
A thoro study of one ethical system and the special develop- 
ment of some division to prove special research work. 
Special study and research work in some field of Sociology 
such as History of Sociology, Social Service, Social Control, 
Economics, Social Pathology, Socialism, etc., or the treat- 
ment of some practical work in social service. 

No. 9. Apologetics axd Polemics. 
History of Apologetics and study of at least one of the 
larger works so as to cover all the main questions in the 
apologetical science. 

A detailed study of some main division or subject, the result 
of such study to be proved by a treatise or thesis. 
Assistance will be given in selection of suitable subjects. 
The study of the Evidence of Christian experience as pre- 
sented by some of the leading authors with a written syn- 
opsis on some leading work. 

The study of the science of Polemics in general, its history 
and methods, or special heresies in churches and religious 
societies may be selected and arguments presented against 
errors and misapprehension of principal doctrines. In this 
course the relation of Polemics and Irenics may be studied, 
the vindication of true unity and the disparagement of 
unionism in theory and practise. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINAKY 



63 



V. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
No. 10. Catechetics and Evangelistics. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

The History of Religious Education. 

A study of the Child; Indoctrination; Formation of Chris- 
tian Character; the relation of the Family, the Church, and 
the State to Religious Education. 

Methods and Means; the Catechism; the Sunday-school; 
Confirmation; Bible Classes; Literatura 
History of Foreign Missions. 

Principles, Methods, and Present State of Foreign Missions. 
Foreign Missions in some special Country or Field. 
The Foreign Missions of the Lutheran Church. 
Home and Inner Missions of the Lutheran Church. 

No. 11. Homiletics. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

History and Fundamental Principles of Homiletics. 
The several types of Sermons, Preparation and Delivery, 
Modern Problems connected with the presentation of Chris- 
tian truth. 



NO. 12. LlTURGICS AND CHRISTIAN ART. 
PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

The study of complete works in Liturgies and Christian Art, 
covering all the main topics. 

Special research work in at least two leading subjects in 
Liturgies and Christian Art such as the following subjects: 
The Ancient Liturgies, the Church Year, The Main Elements 
in Worship, The Order of Public Worship, Hymnology, Mu- 
sic, Architecture, Christian Symbolism, Church furniture, etc. 
Special treatment of one leading topic in Liturgies. Such 
treatment should be as complete as possible and presented 
in written form. 

Special treatment of one main topic in Christian Art which 
must be as complete as possible and presented in written 
form. 

No. 13. Church Polity. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

The study of the science of church Polity, covering its his- 
tory, theories and leading forms of church government. 
Special research work in certain fields, such as the Roman 
Catholic, Lutheran and Reformed, or the leading church 
polities in any of the denominations in the Reformed Church. 



64 THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



Minor 3. Comparative study of leading ideas as expressed in the I 
Episcopal, Territorial, Collegiate, Presbyterian and Congre- \ 
gational system. 

Minor 4. The church polity of the Lutheran Church in the United 1 
States and special treatment of some practical isssues. 

No. 14. Pastobal Theology. 

PROFESSOB HULT 

Minor. The minister's life and pastoral activity, pastoral calls and care 
of souls, synodical and parish problems. 



REGULATIONS AND DEGREES 

A postgraduate student who has completed seven of the courses, four 
majors and three minors, receives the degree of Candidatus Sacrw 
Theologiw. 

The requirements for the C. S. T. degree are "four majors and three 
minors, — one major from each of the four main departments, viz., Old 
Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis, the Historical, and the 
Systematic departments ; and one minor from the Introductory group, 
one from the Practical group, and a third from any one of the four 
main departments." 

No one, however, may register for this degree unless he has passed 
the examinations and completed the requirements for the B. D. degree 
according to the curriculum of the Seminary and has previously ac- 
quired the A. B. degree from a recognized college. If a student is a 
graduate of some other Seminary he must prove by testimonials that 
his theological studies correspond to our course for the B. D. degree 
or comply with its requirements, and he must be an A. B. from a 
recognized college. Non-resident students qualifying for the B. D. 
degree are required, besides the matriculation and diploma fees, to 
pay a fee of five (5) dollars to the professor in the department of the 
topic selected. 

At least one course should be completed each year; but under all 
circumstances a student must report progress before April 1st of each 
year, otherwise the name of the student will be dropped from the 
catalog without previous notice. These studies may be carried on by 
correspondence, but in his own interest the student is urged to make, as 
far as feasible, the major part of his work resident study. Candidates 
may present themselves for the oral and written examinations at any 
time during the school year. By special arrangement other examina- 
tions may take the form of a written treatise. 

The fee for the C. S. T. degree is $65, divided as follows: five (5) 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 65 

dollars registration fee to the treasurer of the Institution when matricu- 
lated; five (5) dollars for the diploma when the degree is conferred; 
ten (10) dollars for each major and five (5) dollars for each minor at 
the beginning of the course to the professor of the subject. 

The degree of Sacrw Theologiw Doctor is conferred upon a Candi- 
datus Sacrae Theologiae who presents an acceptable thesis indicating 
original and fairly exhaustive research work along the chosen line of 
study and which gives evidence of being an actual contribution to the 
sum of theological science. The theme and the thesis must be approved 
by the Theological Faculty. The thesis must cover at least 75 printed 
or 100 typewritten pages, and be submitted in at least two copies. A 
fee of ten (10) dollars is required for the examination of the thesis, 
and a charge of five (5) dollars is made by the Institution for the 
diploma when the degree is conferred. A candidate for the S. T. D. 
must have been in the ministry not less than seven years. 

The above degrees are granted by the Board of Directors on the 
recommendation of the Theological Faculty and conferred at the Com- 
mencement Exercises of the Seminary. 

Further information will be furnished by the individual professors 
on application to the Secretary. Address: Professor C. J. Sodergren, 
1010— 38th Street, Rock Island, 111. 



66 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

The Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art 



THE CONSERVATORY YEAR 
The school year in the Conservatory consists of thirty-six weeks 
divided into four terms as follows: two Pall terms of eight weeks 
each, and two Spring terms of ten weeks each. 

CALENDAR 
1916 
Fall semester, first term, begins 9 a. m., Monday, Sept. 4. 
Fall semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Oct. 28. 
Fall semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Oct. 30. 
Fall semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Dec. 23. 

1917 
Spring semester, first term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Jan. 8. 
Spring semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, March 16. 
Spring semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, March 19. 
Spring semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, May 25. 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. O., K. V. O., 

President. 

JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A. A. G. O., 

Director, 
Professor of Piano, Organ, Harmony, Director of Handel Oratorio Society, Wennerberg 

Chorus (male voices). 

Rev. E. F. BARTHOLOMEW, Ph. D., D. D„ LL. D., 

Lecturer on Psychology in its Relation to Music. 

OLOF GRAFSTRoM 

Professor of Painting and Designing. 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music, Director of Orchestra. 

LEWIS BODMAN CANTERBURY, 

Professor of Voice. 



CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 67 

ARVID SAMUELSON, Mus. Bac. 

Professor of Piano, Director of Oriole Club (ladies' voices). 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc. B., B. E., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

LILLIE CERVIN, B. S., 

Teacher of Piano, Assistant on Organ. 

WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 

Teacher of Public School Music, Piano and Harmony. 

ALTHEA BROWN, 

Teacher of Voice. 

ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Teacher of Piano. 

robert n. Mcdonald, 

Teacher of Piano. 

C. H. KALQUIST, 

Teacher of Wind Instruments, Director of Band. 

HELEN PETERSON, HULDA PETERSON, LOLA BARKER, ELEANOR 

BENGTSON, HELEN PARKER, DAISY STRAND, ROSALIE 

TRAGORDH, MABEL BOHMAN, LEON JELINEK, 

Student Instructors. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



In these days when almost every scheme of education must include 
a course of music, the question where such a course can best be ob- 
tained, is one of vital importance. The multiplicity of musical col- 
leges and conservatories, to say nothing of private teachers, makes the 
solution of the above problem none the easier. It is the purpose of 
this catalog to show some of the advantages possessed by the Augustana 
Conservatory of Music. 

Music as an important factor in a broader education, as an indis- 
pensable factor in cultural development, is gradually gaining ground. 
All the larger colleges and universities are placing the same in their 
curricula. Every individual who claims to be intelligent should feel 
the need of a better understanding and appreciation of music, the 
language of emotions. 

We are living in a practical age, and much of the education in our 
day tends to develop the practical man; but man's needs are not only 
practical, they are also esthetic and sympathetic. We need in this 



68 CONSERVATOBY OF MUSIC 

country not only a full head and full pocket book, but a full heart as 
well; but the study of music is not the development of the emotions 
only, pure emotionalism weakens character. A musical education 
should develop the intellectual man as well. One of our great educators 
has said: "Music is the best mind trainer on the list." A musician 
should be not only a reproducer of others' thoughts and ideas, but a 
broad intelligent thinker; not merely pianist, organist, violinist and 
singer, but musician. Then again, in order to be a broad musician, the 
student should know not only Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, 
etc., but Shakespeare, Holmes, Emerson, Longfellow, etc. A broad 
musical education means a broad intelligent grasp of the hopes, fears, 
and ambitions of man, analytically, comparatively, and historically. 

An institution offering the student an opportunity for such study, 
a conservatory giving the music student such privileges is unquestion- 
ably better equipped to give the student the best advantages. Another 
feature not to be lost sight of is the fact that the student is brought 
in contact with other students who are his equals or superiors. This 
is one of he strongest possible incentives to hard work, and if the 
pupil has any talent or ambition at all, this competition is sure to 
bring it out. And not only the contact with music students, but the 
interchange of ideas with students along other lines is a distinct 
advantage to the music student. 

Augustana Conservatory offers these advantages. 



COURSES OF STUDY 
The usual method of designating courses in music is by grades; 
but in order to facilitate matters in giving credits, the regular plan 
of the courses as followed in the College and Academy has here been 
adopted. No credits are given for w r ork in the preparatory course. 
The odd numbers of the courses, 1-3-5 etc., refer to the work to be done 
during the fall semester of each year, and the even numbers to the 
work outlined for the spring semester of each year. 

OUR CREDIT SYSTEM 

Its advantages. There is unquestionably a distinct advantage in 
placing the work done in a department of music on a strictly credit 
system. The guess work on the part of teachers is corrected, the un- 
certainty in the progress of the student is eliminated. The students 
can from time to time know just how the teachers rate their work. 
This is an incentive to those who are ambitious and a lash to those 
who are careless in their work. To the student who is conscientious 
it is an encouragement. The credit system is an honor system, and 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 69 

I the pride of every student is appealed to. The question arises, Can a 
j student's musical progress be measured in figures? In reply we might 
say, Can a student's progress in mathematics or history or any other 
/subjects be measured in figures? The mere storing of facts in our 
mind, which of course can be measured and summed up in figures, does 
I not necessarily mean wisdom. "Wisdom is the sum total of our in- 
tellectual and emotional experiences." To the storing of facts must 
be added personality and talent to assimilate facts. This is true in 
music, the technical and theoretical progress of a student can be 
brought within the scope of figures, arbitrary, of course, but never- 
theless within some comprehensive system. The interpretative powers, 
the musical understanding, the talent, the emotional powers of a student 
can hardly be brought within the scope of arbitrary figures. Courses 
can not be arranged to create talent but develop the same. Two students 
may gather the same facts in a class or acquire the same technic, the 
one can think and play, but the other can't; but the same number of 
credits in figures must be given both. With a careful study of the 
credit system used in academies and high schools, the Faculty of 
Augustana Conservatory have adopted the credit system and applied 
the same to its courses in music. 

Our figures. The number of credits given are according to the num- 
ber of hours. With piano, for instance, as major subject, the average 
student to make any progress or complete one of our courses in the 
specified time must practise at least 3 hours a day, 18 hours a week. 
In high schools and academies credits are counted according to the 
number of recitation hours in a subject, and laboratory work 2 hours 
for each credit. In piano practise 3 hours of practise counts 1 credit, 
making 6 credits, the two lessons a week making it a total of 7 credits 
a student can make in the Fall term. The Spring term being longer, 
the student can make 8 credits. The total number of credits the 
average student can make in one year with piano as major is 15. To 
complete our courses in piano 60 is necessary, and 3 additional for 
Pedagogy and sight playing, in other words four years. 

Aside from the credits in piano the requirements for graduation are, 
with piano as major, 23 in Theory and History of Music, 10 for Gradu- 
ating Recital, 27 for English, and 37 elective. A grand total for the 
complete course of 160. A word of explanation: the electives may be 
either musical or literary or both. We gladly give credit for work 
done elsewhere, and we also recognize the fact that some students can 
finish a course in less time than we have allotted to the same. This 
makes it possible for students to finish in less than four years. Many 
students with good previous training can finish in two years. The 
figures have been given for the student taking piano as major. The 
sum total of credits (160) for students taking voice, violin, organ or 
public school music is the same, but distributed differently. 



70 CONSEBVATOEY OF MUSIC 

A High School Education with Music. To the students just finishing 
the eight grades and entering high school, whose talents and inclina- 
tion lie distinctly in music, our courses, our requirements, our credit 
system, gives them the opportunity of following their inclinations, and 
gives them what is unquestionably an equivalent to a high school 
education. A study of our courses will bring out the fact that for the 
pianist, as an example, 93 credits are musical and 67 may be literary. 
This represents a broad education without a sacrifice of music study 
to the student who desires a musical training. 

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES 
Teacher's Certificate. 
Graduate Diploma 
Postgraduate Diploma. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Graduate Diploma. 

Piano as major suoject. 

Fibst Yeab. 

Piano courses, 1-2 15 credits 

Theory courses, 1-2, 3-4 4 " 

English courses, 3-4* 8 M 

Second Yeab. 

Piano courses, 3-4 15 credits 

Theory courses, 5-6, 7-8 6 

English, 5-6* 9 

* (See outline of courses in Academy.) 

Third Yeab (Juniob). 

Piano courses, 5-6, 9 16 credits 

Theory courses, 9-10 4 " 

History of Music course, 1-2 2 " 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) 5 " 

Foubth Yeab (Seniob). 

Piano courses, 7-8-10 17 credits 

Psychology 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Normal 2 

Theory (course 13) 1 

Recital 10 

Organ as major suoject. 
Fibst Year. 

Before taking up the organ the pupil shall have finished the pre- 
paratory and first year in piano. 



consebvatoby of music 71 

Second Yeab. 

Organ, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 

English, 5-6 9 

Thibd Yeab (Juniob). 

Organ, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 15 

Theory, 9—10 4 " 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) 5 

Foubth Yeab (Seniob). 

Organ, 5-6 9 credits 

Piano, 9 1 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 " 

Theory, 11-12-13 5 " 

Recital 10 

Violin as major subject. 
Fibst Yeab. 

Violin, 1-2 (7-8) 15 credits 

Theory, 1-2, 3-4 4 

English, 3-4 8 

Second Yeab. 

Violin, 3-4 15 credits 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 

English, 5-6 9 

Thibd Year (Junior). 

Violin, 5-6 15 credits 

Theory, 9-10 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) 5 

Fourth Yeab (Seniob). 

Violin, 7-8 15 credits 

Psychology 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Normal ^ 2 

Theory, 13 1 

Recital 10 



72 C0NSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 

With Voice as major. 
Fibst Yeab. 

Before entering this course in voice the student shall have fin- 
ished the preparatory and first year in piano. 

Second Yeab. 

Voice, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 

English, 5-6 9 

Thebd Yeab (Juniob). 

Voice, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 15 

Theory, 9-10 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) 5 

Foubth Yeab (Seniob). 

Voice, 5-6 9 credits 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 " 

Theory, 13 1 

Recital 10 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Teacheb's Diploma 
Fibst Yeab. 

Theory courses 1-2 (study of Scales) 2 credits 

Theory courses 3-4 (sight singing and ear training) 2 

Voice courses 1-2 9 

Piano courses 1-2 15 

English courses 3-4-5-6 17 

Ensemble 2 

47 
Second Yeab. 

Theory courses 5-6 (sight singing and ear training) 2 credits 

Theory courses 7-8 (Harmony) 4 

Voice courses 3-4 9 " 

Piano courses 3-4 15 

Pedagogy of Music: 

a. Methods — Elementary and Intermediate grades 8 

b. Class room observation (3 hours a week Fall term) 1% " 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 73 

c. Practise Teaching (3 hours a week Spring term) . . . iy 2 " 

Psychology (Elementary) 3 

History of Education and General Pedagogy 1 

English courses 7-8 10 " 

Ensemble 2 

57 
Third Year. 

Theory courses 9-10 (Harmony) 4 credits 

Sight singing and ear training advanced 2 " 

Pedagogy of Music: 

a. Methods, Grammar and High School. 

b. Chorus conducting. 

c. Practise conducting. 

d. Observation and study of the orchestra. 

4 hours per week 18 " 

Practise Teaching (4 hours a week) 4 " 

Psychology in its relation to Music 2 " 

Ensemble 2 " 

Appreciation course (Theory 13) 1 " 

English courses 9-10 10 

Elective. Piano 15 

Violin 15 

Voice 9 

Electives in College or Academy to make up 160 credits necessary to 
Diploma or Public School Music. 

Teacher's Certificate in Public School Music will be offered students 
having completed: 

Courses 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 in Theory 15 credits 

Courses 1-2-3-4 in Piano 30 

Courses 1-2-3-4 in Voice 18 

English 3-4-5-6-7-8 27 

Pedagogy of Music as outlined in 2nd and 3rd years 17 

Psychology in its relation to Music 2 

History of Education and General Pedagogy 1 



ap- 



110 
Any student seeking a Graduate Diploma must have 160 credits, 
portioned (including above outline) as follows: 
Major Requirements. 

Subject. Musical. Literary. Electives. 

Piano 96 27 37 160 

Organ 108 27 25 160 

Voice 103 27 30 160 

Violin 93 27 40 160 

Public School Music .. .. 160 



74 CONSEBVAT0BY OF MUSIC 

The electives can be chosen from either the musical or literary 
courses, or both. 

Teacheb's Cebttficate 
Teacher's certificates will be granted pupils who have completed the 
Junior year in Piano, Organ, Voice and Violin. Public School Music 
students having completed 110 credits necessary in the Public School 
Music course, as previously outlined, will be given a Teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

THE PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT 

The course in pianoforte is designed to equip the student for a career 
as soloist or teacher, or both, and diplomas and certificates are granted 
accordingly. 

The course is based on the dynamic and technical possibilities of the 
modern grand piano and its literature; a comprehensive study of the 
muscles of the shoulder, arm, wrist, hand and finger, the control of 
which is absolutely essential to the attainment of mastery of the art 
of piano-playing. 

The prescribed course requires about five years of the regular student 
of average ability, presuming practically no knowledge of the instru- 
ment when entering the school and also presuming a natural talent 
and maturity of character. 

Due credit will be given to students having completed partial courses 
elsewhere or for work taken under accredited private instructors. 

Advanced and graduate students will have the opportunity of playing 
with instructors in concerted numbers. 

Those not candidates for graduation may have the privilege of 
electing work according to their ability and preparation. 

The course is practically as follows: 

First Year. 
Fundamental principles of piano technic applied according to indi- 
vidual needs. Koehler, Op. 50. Sonatinas by Heller and Kuhlau. Easy 
compositions by Reinecke, MacDowell and Lichner. 

Second Year. 
Coubses 1 — 2. 

Scales and arpeggios: Loeschhorn, Op. 65; Duvernoy, Op. 120; Son- 
atinas by Heller, Lichner and Dussek. Easy compositions by Merkel, 
Jensen, Reinecke and Mendelssohn. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Third Year. 
Coubses 3 — 4. 

Major and minor scales in thirds, sixths, octaves and tenths; Seventh 
chord arpeggios. Octave studies begun. Beren's Velocity and works 



CONSEEVATOBY OF MUSIC 75 

of Czerny. Bach, Two and Three-part Inventions. Sonatas by Clementi, 
Haydn and Mozart. Compositions by Grieg, Mendelssohn, Moszkowski, 
Schubert and MacDowell. 7—8=15 credits. 

Fourth Year. 
Coubses 5 — 6. Teacher's Certificate. 

Sscales and arpeggios in various notions and forms. Tone produc- 
tion and study of trill. Selected studies of Cramer; Pedal studies by 
Gorno and Whiting; Kullak, Octave Studies; Preludes and Fugues of 
Bach. Sonatas by Mozart, Weber and Beethoven. Ensemble playing 
in compositions of modern writers. Compositions by Chopin, Mendels- 
sohn, Schubert, Grieg, MacDowell, etc. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Fifth Year. 
Coubses 7 — 8. Graduation. 

Advanced technical work: Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; Scales 
in double thirds. Bach, Well Tempered Clavichord. Sonatas by Mozart, 
Schubert and Beethoven. Studies by Chopin, Liszt and Godowsky. 
Various works by romantic composers, viz., Chopin, Liszt, Schubert, 
Arensky, Schumann and Debussy. Concertos by Schumann, Chopin, 
Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Saint-Saens and Grieg. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

The above course is suggested to give a general idea of the standard 
maintained and cannot be adhered to strictly, as the needs of no two 
individuals are exactly the same. 

Post-Gbaduate Piano Course. 

This course is established to give the graduates of this school and 
other schools of equal grade, who wish to pursue an artist's career, 
additional training and finish. The course will be two years in length, 
on the completion of which a post-graduate diploma will be given, signed 
by the Director and instructor. A complete recital must be given by 
each candidate during the second year and a thesis prepared. 

The following works, or their equivalents, represent the post-graduate 
course: 

Last five sonatas by Beethoven. Arrangements of Bach's organ works 
by Liszt, d'Albert and Busoni. Sonatas of Chopin, Liszt, Brahms and 
MacDowell. Paganini-Brahms, Variations. Transcendental Etudes of 
Liszt. Balakirew, Fantasie Orientale "Islamey". Godowsky arrange- 
ments of Chopin Etudes. Concertos by Beethoven, Tschaikowsky, 
Brahms and Liszt. 

Coubse in Piano Sight-Playing. 
Coubse 9. 

A course in piano sight-playing will be conducted for those who are 
unable to read instrumental music at sight. Proficiency in this subject 
is strictly insisted upon before graduating from the piano department. 



76 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Lessons are given in classes of four and special attention is given to 
rhythm, embellishments, accompaniments and transposition. This 
course is open only to students of courses 5-6-7-8. Spring term=l credit. 

Coubse in Advanced Pedagogy. 
Couese 10. 

A course in advanced pedagogy is given to equip graduates for their 
profession as teachers of music. This course covers all subjects relating 
to the needs of a musical instructor and is invaluable especially to those 
expecting to devote their lives to the profession of teaching music. 
This course aims to emphasize the essentials in the teacher's equipment. 

Spring term, two periods a week, 2 credits. 

4. COURSE IN ORGAN 
Coubses 1 — 2. 

Some good organ school, such as C. E. Clements. Easier trios for 
organ. Hymnology. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4. 

Hymnology (Phrasing, Registration, Transposition). The church 
service. Easier works of Bach, Guilmant, Rheinberger and others. 

4 — 5. 9 credits. 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Practical modulation and accompanying. The larger works of Bach, 
Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Widor and others. At least three sonatas 
from standard works, and three from Bach's studied, a recital to com- 
plete the courses. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Post-Graduate Courses (2 years). 

A continuation of Courses 5 — 6. The larger works of the great mas- 
ters. A comprehensive understanding of the literature for the organ. 

5. COURSE IN VOICE 

Foreword 

Prospective students in this department should bear in mind that 
the study of Voice presents some aspects radically at variance with 
piano, organ, violin, or any instrumental study. Of these differences 
the two most important are: 

First, the fact that the playing of a piano, violin, organ, etc., is 
a purely artificial accomplishment — that is, no person by nature and 
with no previous knowledge of a piano or violin can play at all; while 
every human being can to some degree and has from the cradle con- 
stantly produced vocal articulation and sounds. It follows, that varia- 
tions in natural ability to sing in any hundred beginning vocal students 
is much more pronounced; and from this it again follows that any 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 77 

curriculum or course of study must be capable of much less rigid 
application in the individual cases, than in the case of piano, violin 
or instrumental study. 

The second point to be remembered is this: In the production of 
tone from any musical instrument — voice, piano, violin, organ, etc., — 
there are three elements: 1) a motor force, 2) a vibrating element, 
and 3) a resonating element, i. e., a sounding board. The important 
fact is often overlooked that in piano study the second and third of 
these elements, i. e., the strings and sounding board, are artificially 
constructed of steel and wood, in the human voice the entire three 
elements are flesh and blood actuated by the most delicate nervous 
impulses, the exact nature of which is still in doubt in the minds of 
the greatest scientific authorities. 

Any curriculum of Voice study is thus subject to larger modifications 
than is the case in instrumental study, and on the sympathetic insight 
of teacher and the loyal co-operation in mind as well as body of the 
pupil will depend ultimate success. How much of a truth this is — 
how greatly a mental concept of vocal tone transcends any possible 
apposition of ligaments, muscles, etc., however admirable, may be in- 
ferred from the fact that while a beginning piano or violin student is 
generally advised to practise a number of hours daily; Mms. Marchesi 
and Signor Manuel Garcia, perhaps the two greatest authorities in 
the realm of pure Italian "Bel Canto," advise a vocal beginner to 
practise 10 or 15 minutes at a time only, several times daily, — a total 
of not over one hour daily. 

Modified always by the important limitations noted above, the cur- 
riculum for a three year Vocal Course will be as follows: 

Courses 1 — 2. 

(1) A careful preliminary explanation of the vocal functions, breath 
actuation and control; the action of the laryngeal muscular system — 
the "coup de Glotte"; the location and functions of the resonance 
cavities in the head and face, and the articulating mechanism of the 
tongue and jaw. 

(2) The portamento scale; exercises for blending the registers and 
equalizing the scales, when needed. 

(3) Attack and tone placing, with gradual progression in scales and 
arpeggios of increasing speed, power and difficulty. 

(4) Simple songs of a sustained nature, regarded principally as Vocal 
Exercises; also Concone's Vocal Exercises. 

(The basis of study will be the Old Italian Method, as exemplified 
in Marchesi's "Art of Singing," and Garcia's "Art du Chant," which 
will be the text books used.) 4—5. 9 credits. 



78 CO'SEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 

COUBSES 3 — 4. 

(1) Marchesi and Garcia Exercises continued, including the estab- 
lishing and control of single tones, swelling and diminishing them 
(the Old Italian "mezza di voce"). Scales of increasing power and 
agility. 

(2) Songs of increased difficulty and superior classical composition 
and form, increasing the musical and esthetic knowledge and taste of 
the pupil. These songs will include the simpler German Lieder, French 
Chansons, and a few of the less difficult Opera Arias of a legato nature. 
The attention of the student will then be gradually directed from 
technical considerations — the tone placing, breath control, etc. — to the 
interpretative side, including careful attention to the wofully neglected 
consideration of pure vowel production and a just enunciation of 
consonants and diphthongs. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Coubses 5 — 6. 

Special studies in Agility, Bravura, and the adequate Declamation 
of Recitatives, both free and in tempo. Oratorio and Operatic Arias 
of increased difficulty, and the Lieder of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, 
Grieg, Richard Strauss, Max Reger, etc.; French songs of the old 
school, — Gounod, Massanet, Godard; and of the newer school, — De 
Bussy, Ravel, Gabriel Faure, and Henry DuParc. In brief, as much 
of the required accomplishment of a finished singer as may be per- 
mitted by the time and the capacity, physical and mental, of the pupil. 

On graduation, the student will be expected to sing acceptably, from 
memory, selections from the standard oratories, such as: 

(Soprano) — "Hear ye, Israel," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah"; "With 
Verdure Clad," from Haydn's "Creation"; "I will extol Thee," from 
Costa's "Eli," etc. 

(Alto) — "Oh Rest in the Lord," from "Elijah"; "He was despised," 
from Handel's "Messiah." 

(Tenor)— "Be Thou Faithful," from Mendelssohn's "St. Paul"; "Com- 
fort Ye," and "Every Valley," from Handel's "Messiah"; "If with all 
your hearts," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah." 

(Bass) — The "Messiah" solos; "Rolling in Foaming Billows," from 
Haydn's "Creation," and the "Pro Peccatis," from Rossini's "Stabat 
Mater." 

Pupils will also be required to have a reasonable repertoire of the 
standard Operatic Arias, German Lieder, and French and Italian songs 
from the sixteenth century to the present day. All this means con- 
centrated work on the mental equally with the physical side, and it is 
desired that students in this department bring such an attitude to the 
work here indicated. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 79 

6. COURSE IN VIOLIN 

This course covers practically all technical phases and styles in 
violin playing. It is the aim of the department to lay a broad and deep 
foundation and to study the individual needs of the student. While 
the poetical or interpretative side of playing is always kept in mind, 
the student is early given to understand that technic is the real 
liberator of the spirit within, the means by which the spirit expresses 
itself, and must, therefore, be most carefully and diligently studied with 
that end in view. 

All students are given the privilege of ensemble practise. Advanced 
students are required to attend orchestral rehearsals regularly and 
must learn to play the viola, subject, however, to the discretion of the 
teacher. 

Preparatory. 

Laoureaux Violin School; Sevcik, Op. 6; Wohlfart, Op. 54; Kayser, 
Op. 20, Bk. 1. Easy pieces and duos by Beazley, Dancla, Rosenbecker, 
and others. 

Courses 1 — 2. 

Laoureaux Violin School, Part II; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. I, and Op. 2; 
Wohlfart, Op. 74; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. II; Sevcik, Op. 7 and Op. 8, 
begun. Selected pieces and duos. 7 — 8. 15 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4. 

David's Violin School, Part II; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. Ill; Mazas, Op. 
36, Bks. I and II; Sevcik, Op. 8, continued; Bauer, Scales and Arpeggios; 
Sevcik, Op. 2; Kreutzer Etudes begun. Pieces by Bach, Handel, etc., 
sonatas by Haydn and Mozart, concertos by De Beriot, Kreutzer, and 
Viotti. 7—8. 15 credits. 

Courses 5 — 6. 

Kreutzer Etudes; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. Ill; Sevcik, Op. 2; Fiorillo 
Etudes; sonatas, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and pieces from 
various composers; concertos by De Beriot, Mozart, Rode, Viotti. 

7 — 8. 15 credits. 
Courses 7—8. 

Rode, 24 caprices; Rovelli, 12 studies; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bks. Ill and IV; 
concertos and concert pieces by Rode, Spohr, Hubay, Wieniawski and 
others. 7—8. 15 credits. 

POST GRADUATE COURSES (2 YEARS) 
Bach solo sonatas; Grand studies by Gavinies, Dont, Paganini, etc.; 
standard concertos and concert pieces by modern composers. 



80 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

COURSES IN THEORY 

♦Courses 1 — 2. Notation study of the scales 

1 hour a week. 2 credits. 
♦Courses 3 — 4. Sight singing and ear training. 

1 hour a week. 2 credits. 
♦Courses 5 — 6. Sight singing and ear training. 

1 hour a week. 2 credits. 
Courses 7 — 8. Harmony — Intervals, triads, seventh chords. Harmo- 
nization of melodies. 2 half hours a week. 4 credits. 
Courses 9 — 10. Altered chords, suspensions, foreign tones. Harmoni- 
zation of melodies. 2 half hours a week. 4 credits. 
Courses 11 — 12. Counterpoint. 2 half hours a week. 4 credits. 
♦Course 13. Analysis and Appreciation. 1 hour a week. 1 credit. 
♦Course 14. The Orchestra and its instruments. 

1 hour a week. 1 credit. 
♦History of Music. Courses 1 — 2, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 
♦Psychology in its relation to music. 1 hour a week. 2 credits. 

♦Lectures on Liturgies. 1 credit. 

♦Lectures on Physics of sound. 1 credit. 

♦Ensemble work and accompaniment (Chorus, Orchestra or Band). 

2 credits. 
♦Normal work. Lectures on touch and tone formation. Teaching 
repertoire. Practical work under the supervision of the teacher. 

2 credits. 
NOTE. Courses marked with an asterisk are free, subject to rules and regulations- 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 

To properly understand music or any other art, it is necessary to 
have a knowledge of the history of its development and an acquaintance 
with the conditions under which it began and reached its maturity. 
Two courses in Music History are offered. Courses 1 — 2 give a general 
survey of music and its development from the earliest times to the 
present; courses 3 — 4 embrace special topics in the History of Music. 

Each course 2 credits. 

PSYCHOLOGY IN MUSIC 

Psychology is now regarded as the fundamental science, the science 
which must shape the methods of studying and teaching every other 
subject. Correct scientific knowledge of the human mind and of its 
various modes of activity, together with a working knowledge of the 
nervous system, lies at the bottom of all educational philosophy. Psy- 
chology stands in a most important and practical relation to the study 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 81 

of music. The demand of the present is that methods of studying and 
teaching music must be based on sound pedagogical and rational prin- 
ciples, and it is the office of psychology to discover and formulate such 
principles. The signs of the times indicate that along this line of 
progress the best results are to be achieved for the years to come. 
Augustana Conservatory, recognizing these facts and principles, makes 
the study of psychology an important part in its courses of study. 
A full course on the Relation of Psychology to Music is given, extending 
thruout the year, which all candidates for graduation are required to 
take. 2 credits. 

MUSIC 
The college faculty has considered the granting of College and 
Academy credits for work in music, and decided as follows: 

1. That we recognize music as a subject for entrance to college to 
the extent of one-half or one unit. 

2. That we allow ten credits in our academy for a two year course 
in music, as outlined in the accompanying statement, at the rate of 
two credits for each fall term and three for each spring term; provided 
that these credit-hours are entered in the regular way on the student's 
course-slip. 

3. That we allow a maximum of ten credits to students enrolled 
in college, the number of credits per term and the other conditions 
being the same as above stated for academy students. 

COLLEGE 
Applied Music Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Advanced grades. 

2 years, one lesson per week. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 

2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music. 

Methods — advanced (Including Sight singing, Ear training and 

Practise teaching). 
Harmony. 1st year. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble work (Chorus, Orchestra, Band). 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Theory Course. 

Harmony, 2nd year. 

Music Essentials and Appreciation. 

History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 10 credits. 



82 CONSEBVATOBT OF MU8IC 

ACADEMY 
Applied Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin or Voice intermediate grades. 

(2 years, 1 lesson a week). 

Sightsinging — 1st and 2nd years. 

2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music Course. 
Methods. Primary. 

Sightsinging and Ear training 1st and 2nd years. 

Ensemble. (Chorus, Orchestra or Band). 

2 years. 10 credits. 

Theory Course. 

Harmony. 1st year. 

Psychology in its relation to Music. 

Sightsinging and Ear training 1st and 2nd years. 

Ensemble. 2 years. 10 credits. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

TIME NECESSARY 

The time required to finish any of the preceding courses is different 
according to the circumstances. First, it depends on the pupil's ad- 
vancement on entering the Conservatory, and secondly, on his talents 
and industry. 

It is advisable to take ample time for the work required, as hurried 
work never brings satisfactory results. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Final examinations in the instrumental and vocal departments are 
not left to the sole approval of the individual teachers, but must be 
held before the President and Conservatory faculty. 

Diplomas or Certificates will be given to students having completed 
the prescribed courses. 

RULES AND REGLUATIONS 

1. Students are not received at the beginning of the term for a 
shorter period than for the whole term. All pupils entering the Con- 
servatory after the beginning of the term must register for single 
lessons for the remainder of the term. 

2. Pupils obliged to leave during any term are given no rebates 
unless for a continuous half term's absence. In special cases of pro- 
tracted illness extending over two or more weeks the pupil will be 
allowed the privilege of taking the lost lessons in a later term, pro- 
vided notice of such illness has been given at once to the professor 
in charge of the subject. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 83 

3. Upon leaving the Conservatory each pupil is entitled to a testi- 
lionial, specifying the time passed at the institution and the standing 
in the studies pursued. 

4. Regular attendance of pupils is expected at all recitals and con- 
certs given by the faculty and students. 

5. No student during his senior year will be allowed to appear in 
public without permission from his teacher. 

6. Altho not compulsory, it is advisable that pupils in all depart- 
nents take two lessons per week. 

7. Students taking two private lessons a week, are entitled to three 
Iree subjects in Theory. A student taking two private lessons a week 
s allowed to take two subjects in Academy or Freshman year in 
College without extra charge. Students taking only one lesson a week 
will be entitled to only one free subject in Theory. 

TUITION 

J. Victor Bergquist 

Two lessons a week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $22.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 22.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Single lessons 1.50 

Abvid Samuelson 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $22.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 22.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Single lessons 1.50 

Algert Anker 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $22.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 22.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Single lessons < 1.50 

Special arrangements in price for beginners and intermediate grade 
for students in Violin can be made with the Director and teacher. 



84 CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 

ROBEBT MACDONALD 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $16.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 16.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 20.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 20.00 

Single lessons 1.25 

Lillie Cebvix — Althea Bbown 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $12.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 12.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Single lessons 1.00 

ESTHEB FBYXELL 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $ 9.60 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 9.60 

First spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Single lessons 75 

Classes in Course in Theory, Sight Playing 
Two half-hour lessons per week: 

First fall term $6.00 

Second fall term 6.00 

First spring term 8.00 

Second spring term 8.00 

It is to be observed that all subjects in theory to students enrolled 
for two private lessons a week, with the exception of Harmony and 
Counterpoint, are free. Any student enrolled for one lesson, or regular 
students from other departments who wish to take up any of the free 
subjects in theory, can do so at the rate of $1.50 for each fall term 
and $2.00 for each spring term. 

Class in Piano Pedagogy, each fall term $1.50, each spring term $2.00. 

A special children's beginners class under the supervision of the 
teachers of the Conservatory, will be organized, the lessons to be given 
by students in the last year of the Teacher's Certificate Course. 

Tuition for these classes. 
One lesson, private, a week: 

First fall term $2.00 

Second fall term 2.00 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 85 

First spring term 2.50 

Second spring term 2.50 

Public School Music 
Pedagogy of Music (including Methods and Practise teaching) : 

Each fall term $16.00 

Each spring term 20.00 

Methods (partial course) per week 1.00 

(Including sight singing and ear training.) 
Theory (see tuition for classes in courses in Theory). 
Piano, Voice, Violin or Organ (see terms of the different teachers). 
For all free subjects, see Rules and Regulations. 

Other Expenses in the Conservatory 

1. Diplomas in any of the courses $5.00 

2. Rental — Pedal organ, one hour a day, per hour 15 

Rental — Pipe organ, per hour .25 

3. Rental — Piano, 1 hour a day, per month 1.00 

Rental — Piano, 2 hours a day, per month 1.90 

Rental — Piano, 3 hours a day, per month 2.50 

Additional hours, per month, per hour 50 

4. Physical Culture (optional). 

Gymnasium fee 1.00 



SCHOOL OF ABT 



The School of Art 



Olof Gbafstbom, Abtist, 

From the Royal Academy of Art, Stockholm, Sweden. 

In connection with the Conservatory of Music instruction is given in 
Drawing and Designing in the various branches of Painting. 

SCOPE OP WORK 

Thoro instruction is given in Drawing, Light and Shade, Still-life, the 
Cast, Antique, Fruits, Flowers, Decorative work, etc., thru the usual 
mediums, Oil, Charcoal, Crayon and Pencil. 

The methods are such as will lead most directly to work from nature 
and life, an end so easily attained by any earnest art student. 

ANTIQUE 
The advantages of this study from the antique cast are the knowl- 
edge we get of the ideal human form and the opportunity it affords the 
student for careful, cool, reflective study, thus fortifying the student 
against the difficulties occurring in work from life. 

SKETCH CLASS 
A sketch class, from life, is formed, care being taken so to arrange 
the pose that the students' sketches may be of service to them when 
they wish to introduce a figure into landscape-sketches or compositions. 

LIFE OR PORTRAIT CLASS 
The object of this study is to give the students a thoro drill in the 
study of realistic flesh-color, expression, position, drapery, harmony, 
etc. 

PORTRAITS 

Instruction will be given to those wishing to color photographs (the 
Solar print) in oil or water colors, or finish in India-Ink. 

Any one with ordinary ability can, by this means, soon learn to 
execute life-size portraits nearly as perfect as the photographs from 
which they are taken, and often with better expression. 

SACRED ART 
Prof. Grafstrom has during the year, as during previous years, 
painted a large number of altar pieces for churches in all parts of the 



SCHOOL OF ABT 87 

country, and these works of sacred art are more and more becoming 
recognized as productions of the very highest artistic merit. Congre- 
gations desiring to adorn their houses of worship with appropriate altar 
pieees of thoro artistic design and execution should communicate with 
Prof. Grafstrom. 

ART EXHIBITION 
During Commencement week, a free exhibition in the Art Ro»m is 
given, which will explain, better than words, the grade and success of 
the work done in the School of Art. 

TUITION IN ART DEPARTMENT 

Each fall term, of 8 weeks, two lessons per week $15.00 

Each spring term, of 11 weeks, two lessons per week 21.00 

Annual Registration Fee 1.00 

A student paying the above tuition in advance is allowed to work in 
the Art Room five days of each week. 

Arrangements for a smaller number of lessons per week can be made 
with the professor of the subject. 

CALENDAR 
See page 66. 



88 ELOCUTION 



Elocution 



Iya Cabbie Peabce, Sc. B., B. E. 

The training offered the pupil in the department of oral expression 
has for its aims: 

1. The cultivation of observation, reasoning, memory and poetic 
imagination. 

2. The development of the individuality of each pupil. 

3. The freeing of his voice and body for the full manifestation of 
thought and emotion. 

4. To give him command of himself and skill in the use of his 
several powers. 

5. To arouse in him a desire to know the best in literature, and to 
vocally interpret it. 

6. To awaken the mind of each student to a just appreciation of the 
correlation of the arts. 

The following courses are offered: 

A fundamental course in articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, prin- 
ciples of grouping, bodily expression, and voice culture. 

A course in the analytical study and vocal interpretation of the best 
English and American writers. 

A course in dramatic expression. 

A course in public speaking in which pupils are trained to "think 
upon their feet," and express themselves in clear forcible speech. 

Constant endeavor is used to make all the work of this department 
of practical service to the student either as a means of general culture 
or as a training in more adequate and effective expression of himself 
in the business of every day life. 





GRADUATION 




A diploma is given upon the completion of the following course: 






First Year 




FALL TEBM 




SPBING TEBM 




Fundamental Principles 


of Ex- 


Fundamental Principles of 


Ex- 


pression 


4 


pression 


4 


Voice Culture 


1 


Voice Culture 


1 


Vocal Expression 


3 


Vocal Expression 


3 


English 


3 


English 


3 


Physical Gulture 


1 


Physical Culture 


1 


Psychology 


3 


Dramatic Art 


3 





ELOCUTION 




Second 


Year 


FALL TEBM 




SPBING TEBM 


Vocal Expression 


3 


Vocal Expression 


Development of Expression 


4 


Public Speaking 


Oratory 


3 


Literary Interpretation 


Recitals 


3 


Recitals 


Bodily Expression 


2 





89 



3 
4 
3 
5 

Entrance Requirements 120 credits earned in any recognized high 
school or academy. 

Students pursuing a four years course in college and taking half-work 
each year in the School of Expression will be given a diploma from 
that department at the end of their college course. 

Pupils taking two private lessons a week receive class instruction 
without extra hcarge. 

TUITION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION 

One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each $12.00 
One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 6.00 
Two private lessons per week, 60 minutes each 24.00 
Two private lessons per week, 30 minutes each 12.00 
''One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each $15.00 
One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 7.50 
Two private lessons per week, 60 minutes each 30.00 
Two private lessons per week, 30 minutes each 15.00 



Each fall term 

of 8 weeks " 



Each spring term 
of 10 weeks 



CALENDAR 
See page 66. 



90 COMMEBCIAL DEPARTMENT 



The Commercial Department 

FACULTY 
Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. O., K. V. 0., 

President. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A. B., M. Accts., LL. B., 

Principal of Commercial Department. 

ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL. B., Secretary, 

Teacher of Penmanship, Bookkeeping, and Arithmetic. 

ETTA SETTERDAHL, 

Teacher of Shorthand, Typewriting, and Office Training. 

SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B. D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

ARTHUR BENJAMIN NICHOLSON, 

Assistant in Bookkeeping and Typewriting. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Twenty-eight years ago the Board of Directors of Augustana College, 
perceiving the great demand for practical business training among the 
youth of this country, founded in intimate connection with other de- 
partments of the institution, the Augustana Commercial Department. 
This department has since grown, from a comparatively small begin- 
ning, into a thoroly equipped business training school, preparing annu- 
ally, in a most thoro manner, a large number of young people for the 
various lines of business. 

The department offers three courses of study which are as complete, 
symmetrical, and practical as untiring efforts, close observation of 
business methods, and experience can render them. Instruction in the 
Christian religion is also provided for in that a regular course of Bible 
Study is offered to all students. The faculty is composed of skilled and 
carefully trained teachers, and the patronage consists of a class of 
young people who are characterized by intelligence, good character, 
ambition, and an earnest devotion to their own real interests. 

Course Leading to Graduate Accountant. 
Entrance Requirements: 

The entrance requirements for this course is the completion of 
Eighth Grade work, or its equivalent. 



COMMERCIAL DEPABTMENT 91 

Course. 

1. Bookkeeping 10 hours a week for 34 weeks. 

Four Sets of "20th" Century Bookkeeping. 

Office Practise in College Bank 2 weeks. 

2. Commercial Arithmetic 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Civil Government 4 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

4. Commercial Law 5 hours a week for 16 weeks. 

5. Penmanship 4 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Spelling and Denning 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

7. Correspondence 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

8. English Grammar 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

(Academy I or equivalent). 

9. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of from 60% to 

79% on Pinal Examination (excepting Spelling 90%) will be entitled 
to a Certificate for such work. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of 80% or more 
on Final Examinations (excepting Spelling 90%) will be entitled to the 
degree Graduate Accountant. 

Course leading to Master of Accounts. 
Entrance Requirements: 

The entrance requirements for this course is the satisfactory com- 
pletion of course for Graduate Accountant, or its equivalent. 

Course. 

1. Advanced Accountancy 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

Wholesale Accounting. 

Commission and Jobbing. 
Cost Accounting. 
American National Banking. 
Adding Machine Exercises. 

Special Sets: 
Lumber Accounts. 
Farm Accounts. 
Furniture Accounts. 

2. Algebra 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Constitutional Law 4 hours a week for 16 weeks. 

4. Political Economy 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

5. Elementary Law 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

Real Property. 

Domestic Relations. 

Torts. 

Crimes. 

Wills and Administration. 



92 COMMERCIAL DEPABTMENT 

6. Penmanship 4 hours a week for 36 weeks. \ 

7. Lettering and Ornate Penmanship 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

8. Advertising and Salesmanship 1 hour a week for 16 weeks. 

9. Commercial Geography 4 hours a week for 16 weeks. 

10. English, Composition and Literature C 5 hours a week for 16 weeks. 
(Academy II or equivalent) i 4 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

11. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

Students completing the above course and passing Final Examina- 
tions with a grade of 80% or more, will be entitled to the degree of 
Master of Accounts. 

STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

1. Stenography 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

2. Typewriting 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Spelling and Defining 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

4. English 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

5. Correspondence 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 



REMARKS ON COURSES OF STUDY 

BOOKKEEPING 

The student assumes the position of bookkeeper for some person 
engaged in business at the beginning of his work, and continues in this 
capacity until the course is completed. This is much better than 
having him use his own name and keep books for himself, since it 
is a known fact that very few men engaged in business keep their 
own books, this being done by the bookkeeper who is employed for 
that purpose. The student receives a salary from the beginning until 
the work is completed, the same being increased from time to time as 
his knowledge of bookkeeping increases. He makes no entries on his 
books except from the transactions made by his employer, which are 
indicated to him by the business papers representing the transaction, 
or by direct instruction of his employer. These business papers and 
instructions are put up in envelops designated "Business Transactions," 
as explained hereafter. 

Since the student, who has assumed the position of bookkeeper, 
knows nothing in regard to the principles of bookkeeping, or the 
method of recording the transactions, it is necessary that he be given 
instructions in regard to these. The instructions are contained in a 
book, designated as the "Reference Book," and the student is given 
references to this book by either paragraph number or the page on 
which the transactions are to be found. Thus when he opens an 
envelop and finds therein a business transaction, he is given any needed 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 93 

instruction by his employer in regard to this, and is then referred to 
the Reference Book for the principles involved and the method of 
recording the transaction on his books. 

PART I 

The object of this work is to give the student a thoro explanation 
of the principles of bookkeeping and their application. In this work 
only two books are introduced, the Journal as the book of original 
entry, and the Ledger, as that of complete entry. By constant use of 
the Journal where the debits and credits of each transaction are 
clearly set forth, the student will soon learn that each transaction 
must affect at least two accounts, each amount being equal, and that 
where more than two accounts are affected, the debits and credits 
arising therefrom must be equal. 

The transactions to be recorded cover a period of three months' 
time, January, February, and March. For the first few days' work, 
only one transaction is placed in an envelop, which is to prevent the 
student from getting confused, but after the first few days' work is 
completed a number of transactions are placed in each envelop and 
cover a period of two or three days. Each business paper, which 
represents a transaction to the student, is a reproduction of some form 
in use by some business house or bank. The transactions are identical 
with those in any business community, the student assuming the 
position of bookkeeper for Mr. Goodwin, who is engaged in the retail 
grocery business. In this work the student takes off four Trial 
Balances, makes three Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger three 
times. In addition he is given a thoro drill in bill making, writing 
notes and checks, dealing with a bank, and the handling of the various 
other business papers used in everyday business. The explanation 
for the doing of each of these is given in the Reference Book. 

PART II 
In this work the student assumes the position of bookkeeper for 
C. W. Kneeland, who is engaged in retail business. The object of this 
work is to teach the practical application of the principles of debits 
and credits by introducing the Sales-book, Invoice-book, and Cash- 
book. The student is given a thoro explanation of the uses and 
advantages of each of these, also an analysis showing the work saved 
by their introduction. The work of this part covers a period of three 
months, each envelop containing the instructions for three days. In 
addition to learning the use of the above-named books, the student is 
taught how to render statements of accounts to customers on the first 
of the month, the use of special columns in the Cash-book, the entries 
required when a partner is admitted into the business, and various 
other important points. In this work the student takes off three Trial 



94 COMMEBCIAL DEPARTMENT 






Balances, makes two Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger twice. The 
Trial Balances have from 50 to 65 accounts, which makes the work 
more interesting to the student, it being necessary for him to depend 
on his own accuracy in keeping a history of so many accounts. 

PARTS III AND IV 
Part III introduces Wholesale bookkeeping, and Part IV Corporation 
and Manufacturing. The two cover a period of four months and 
require four Trial Balances, two Balance Sheets, and the closing of 
the Ledger twice. The transactions are identical with those which 
occur in the territory of any wholesale house. The advantages of 
special ruling, loose leaf devices, and the various short cuts used in 
modern accounting are clearly set forth. An opportunity is given 
the student to practically apply his knowledge of bookkeeping and test 
his ability to keep books. 

BANKING 

Each student of bookkeeping is a bookkeeper, doing the work just 
as it is done in an office. Since the bookkeepers in the business world, 
to a certain extent, make the transactions for the banks, the students 
will make the transactions for a bank in the school room. The checks 
and money which he receives must be deposited; drafts and other 
papers left for collection; notes discounted; New York exchange pur- 
chased; change obtained; checks certified; and there are various other 
transactions which the bookkeeper must transact with the bank. By 
having the advanced student act as a banker for those students in the 
bookkeeping work, an excellent practical course in banking is obtained. 
The student in the bank learns to make the proper record on the 
Individual Ledger, Collection and Discount Register, New York Ex- 
change Book, Teller's Book, Remittance Register, General Cash Book, 
and General Ledger. 

ARITHMETIC AND RAPID CALCULATION 
Special attention is paid to the work in this branch, and very com- 
plete courses are offered. No student can expect to progress satisfac- 
torily in the science of accounts, without having a thoro understanding 
of the subject of Arithmetic. One hour's class work a day during the 
entire course is devoted to the subject in general, and a half-hour each 
day is devoted to exercises in rapid addition, substraction, multiplica- 
tion, fractions, interest, discount, averaging accounts, etc. These drills 
are of the greatest value, making the students not only rapid and 
accurate, but giving them confidence in themselves. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT 
The education of an American citizen must always be considered 
incomplete without a thoro knowledge of the government under which 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 95 

he lives. The Commercial Department, therefore, offers a complete 
course in Civil Government. The subject is taught in such a manner 
as to acquaint the student with the functions of the various parts of 
the governmental machinery, the relations of the states to each other 
and to the general government and such other facts as will enable 
him to perform intelligently the duties of citizenship. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 
Altho the student is carefully drilled in the execution of business 
papers while pursuing the study of Bookkeeping, a course in Commer- 
cial Law is added to supplement his knowledge. It is not expected 
that the student will acquire professional knowledge of the subjects, 
as this would require a thoro course in a school of law. The purpose 
is to aquaint him thoroly with the legal principles which constitute 
the foundation of law. The course embraces thoro instruction in the 
following branches of business law: Contracts, Negotiable Papers, 
Guaranty and Suretyship, Interest and Usury, Sales of Personal Prop- 
erty, Bailments, Agency, Partnership, Joint-Stock Companies, Corpora- 
tions, Fire, Life, and Marine Insurance. The student is required to 
commit to memory many of the legal papers, thus enabling him to 
draw them without referring to a book of forms. 

PENMANSHIP 
All students receive daily drills in Business Writing. A clean, legible, 
rapid business hand is not an inherited gift; but any person of good 
intelligence may secure such a hand, unless physically unable to learn. 
The time required to accomplish this result varies from three months 
to one year, and is dependent upon previous opportunities and natural 
aptitude. A special Penmanship diploma is awarded to those who 
acquire proficiency in plain business writing. 

SPELLING AND DEFINING 
Daily written exercises of graded work are given. The student is 
: not only taught to spell and pronounce words, but is required to define 
and memorize them, thus greatly increasing his readiness in the use 
of English. 

PRACTICAL ENGLISH 
The ability to write the English language fluently and correctly is 
a great accomplishment for any young man or woman. Special atten- 
tion is therefore given to grammatical drill and to correct use of the 
English language in speaking and writing. 

BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 
This feature of the course aims to give the pupil such suggestions 
regarding the requisites of correspondence as will enable him to con- 
struct, arrange, paragraph, and punctuate a business letter, so that 



96 COMMEBCIAL DEPARTMENT 

it shall convey its intended meaning without unnecessary verbiage or 
confusion, and shall appear to the best advantage. 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY 

At the outset an apparatus and a reference book, containing the 
principles and laws of bookkeeping, are put into the hands of the 
student and are employed by him for the purpose of carrying on all 
the practical business operations and bookkeeping entries which are 
daily performed in regular business offices. 

The apparatus consists of a Bureau which contains a budget of series 
of transactions. The budget consists of a number of sheets or leaves 
secured together, upon which are printed the necessary instructions 
and between which are contained the business papers, vouchers, and 
other memoranda, which furnish to the student the data from which 
he makes the proper entries, and performs the necessary office work. 

Each budget is so arranged that as each sheet or leaf is raised or 
torn off, the business papers, etc., of the transaction, or a number of 
transactions, are exposed for the consideration of the student. The 
sheets are so secured that the interleaved matter cannot be removed 
or examined until the sheet and business papers are torn off or removed. 

WHOLESALE SET 

The purpose of this set is to illustrate a wholesale business conducted 
by a partnership, at first consisting of two persons. An additional 
partner is admitted later. The business of a wholesale grocery house 
is represented, with many of the peculiarities of the trade in groceries 
treated incidentally. The terms of credit, discounts, business methods, 
form and customs of this and many other wholesale lines are fully 
discussed and carefully observed in working up the set. 

This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
January, February, March, and April in which ten different books are 
introduced. 

The transactions for the months of January and February are 
illustrated by all the business papers received and issued. The trans- 
actions for March and April are supplied in memorandum form, the 
purpose being to direct the student's attention to the use of special 
columns in the various books of account. The business papers are 
omitted, because he has had ample practise in the preparation of all 
classes of papers pertaining to this line of business in the work of the 
two preceding months. 

A valuable feature is the very full information given in regard to 
the established customs, practises and usages that are everywhere 
followed in executing the various transactions illustrated. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 97 

JOBBING AND COMMISSION SET 
This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
conducted as a corporation. The transactions illustrate the organiza- 
tion of a corporation, the issuing of the certificates of stock and the 
opening of the books, the series covering every phase of the jobbing 
and commission business with numerous closings of the books showing 
the disposition of the profits in accordance with the various instruc- 
tions of the Board of Directors. 

In addition to the transaction recorded in the regular set of books 
the budget contains a series of supplementary exercises in corporation 
accounts, for the opening and closing of corporation accounts and books 
under all the conditions to be met with, which are explained and 
elucidated for the training of the student. 

COST ACCOUNTING 

This is also a corporation set and introduces the special features 
of Cost Accounting. The business is conducted for the purpose of 
manufacturing gas engines, and includes the ordering of the parts, 
and, in some instances, their manufacture. The machining and assemb- 
ling of the parts, and the completion of the engines called for in produc- 
tion orders, are based upon figures taken from actual production orders 
of a large manufacturer of gas engines. Indeed, the different manu- 
facturing costs are taken from actual figures, with slight variations here 
and there, to bring about such results as are necessary to illustrate 
the different phases of practical manufacturing. 

Time tickets, payroll sheets and other incidental papers and forms 
are used. Every detail of the business of an actual manufacturing 
concern is shown, and the various features of the usual manufacturing 
business have been so fully and carefully covered that the set can be 
used as a perfect illustration of a system of manufacturing accounts 
which may be installed in any concern, whether of large or small 
proportions. 

In working up the set, the student fills various positions. He acts 
as the bookkeeper in recording transactions in the general books; as 
an accountant in the preparation of various statements and other 
documents required to exhibit the results of the business transacted, 
as stores or material clerk, as cost clerk in recording the cost of 
materials, labor and manufacturing expenses on production orders and 
in figuring the cost of finished goods, as stock clerk and as payroll 
and time clerk. 

BANKING 

This set introduces the subject of American National Banking, in a 
very interesting and complete manner. 



98 COMMEBCIAL DEPARTMENT 

ALGEBRA 
Academic courses 3 and 4. 

CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

The Constitution of the United States is studied and the application 
of legal principles as it pertains to the laws of the States is given 
special attention. U. S. Supreme court decisions are read and dis- 
cussed. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY 

The entire course is devoted to a discussion of questions relating 
to the practical application of the principles of Economics. 

ELEMENTARY LAW 

This course is intended to more fully explain the origin and applica- 
tion of the common law rules in this country. Lectures on assigned 
topics are given; "cases" are read and discussed. 

ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 

This course is given in the form of lectures by experienced men of 
the three cities. 

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY 
This subject takes up the study of the influence on industrial prog- 
ress of climate and topography, of social conditions, of manufacturing 
and transportation facilities, and of financial conditions, giving due 
weight to each as a factor in economic development. 

LETTERING AND ORNATE PENMANSHIP 

It is the aim of these subjects to teach the student such lettering 
and writing as may be used in marking packages, labels, diagrams, 
plans, index records, documents, titles, show card writing, commercial 
designs, etc. 

ENGLISH 
Academic courses 5 and 6. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Weekly lectures on suitable subjects are given to the whole depart- 
ment. The subjects are so chosen as to best illustrate the great im- 
portance of living a clean and Christian life. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 99 



THE STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

The principal aim of this course is to fit young men and women for 
positions as stenographers or private secretaries. 

Class instruction is given, and so suited to the peculiarities of each 
student as to bring out the best results possible. 

STENOGRAPHY 

Our Shorthand Course qualifies young men and women for high- 
class positions in all lines of stenographic work, as amanuenses, teach- 
ers in business colleges, and for the Cival Service. 

The Benn Pitman System of Shorthand has always been taught in 
our school. It is the shortest and most interesting system of short- 
hand ever invented. We teach this system because 85% of all United 
States Government employes write Pitman Phonography. Also be- 
cause all speed records prove that those who qualify in speed contests 
are Pitmanic writers. 

The text-books are the Phonographic Amanuensis together with 
Progressive Dictation Exercises by Jerome B. Howard. After having 
completed these books, the student enters upon the work in Eldridge's 
Shorthand Dictation Exercises, a special text-book designed as a guide 
to the work of accurate reporting. There are hundreds of letters in 
this book which have been selected with the greatest care, in order to 
give the student a thoro drill in the art of letter writing. The articles 
given are selections similar to those employed in the United States 
Civil Service examinations. 

PHRASEOGRAPHY 
Discriminating attention is given to phrasing, or the joining together 
of two or more common and frequently recurring words, thus saving 
the time consumed in lifting the pen or pencil. The pupil is shown 
what may be done in this respect, consistently with legibility, and, as 
equally important, is advised what not to do. The text-book used con- 
tains six thousand of the most useful phrases, written in the briefest 
manner. 

BUSINESS LETTERS 
Hundreds of business letters, prepared especially for this course, are 
next dictated. These cover a wide range of subjects and form numer- 
ous complete series of correspondence, such as will occur in the future 
office work of the stenographer. Correspondence is opened with vari- 
ous firms, and the student is expected to keep informed of the progress 
of the different negotiations. 



100 COMMEBCTAL DEPABTMENT 

DICTATION 

We have recently added to our already complete course the dicta- 
tion of business letters in our advanced departments. 

These letters are dictated by those in our Practical room to the 
advanced students in the Shorthand department. 

This feature is not only very interesting, but helpful to all the 
students. It gives confidence in letter writing to those who dictate, 
and affords the very best practise to those studying shorthand, as it 
is office experience. 

These letters are handed to the teachers for approval. Our aim is 
to furnish business men the very best help possible, and judging from 
the number of calls we are receiving for bookkeepers and stenograph- 
ers, we believe our efforts are appreciated by the business men. 

TYPEWRITING 

The students of our Stenographic Course begin their work on the 
typewriter the very first day. We teach the "Touch System" from the 
beginning, and therefore the student learns to operate with blank key- 
boards. The advantages of the Touch System may readily be seen, 
for the operator is not required to take his eyes from the notes to 
watch the keys of the machine while transcribing them. 

The typewriting room is fitted with a sufficient number of standard 
machines exclusively, including the Remington, Underwood, Monarch, 
Smith Premier, and Oliver. No expense is spared in securing the best 
instruction in this important subject. 

The typewriting room is in charge of a special and efficient teacher. 
A great deal of actual work is done in this department, including 
mimeographing of all kinds for regular customers, the orders being 
sent in from the various departments of the College. 

We teach Typewriting thoroly, as this subject is not to be taught 
by half measures and ours is not a school of half methods. Thoroness 
is our maxim, and our reward is the success of our graduates. 

A Certificate of Proficiency is awarded to students making a grade 
of 50 net words per minute. 

THE PRACTISE DEPARTMENT 
To properly fit the student, the daily routine work of the office is 
performed constantly. Large numbers of actual business letters are 
dictated to the student, who takes them down in phonography and then 
transcribes his notes quickly and neatly upon the typewriter. All 
work is handed in to be criticized; the errors are marked plainly and 
the sheets returned to the student, to be correctly rewritten. Thus 
his attention is vividly called to his deficiencies, and the importance 
of absolute accuracy is repeatedly impressed upon him. The various 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 101 

processes of letter press copying are taught, each student copying his 
approved work into proper hooks, according to one of these methods. 
Due attention is given to drill in folding letters, the use of the type- 
writer appliance for writing on postal cards or note paper, directing 
envelopes, regulating the margins, etc. Each student indexes his own 
letter-book, files the letters, and performs other duties about the office. 

SPEED-CLASSES, DRILLS, ETC. 
The graded speed-class, both in phonography and typewriting, pro- 
duces marked improvements combined with good work. The students 
can read the phonographic notes fluently, they are also to read each 
other's writing, as well as the phonography in the Benn Pitman phono- 
graphic publications. 

SPELLING 

The course offered in this subject is calculated to correct errors of 
spelling and fix in the mind of the future stenographer not only the 
orthography of the word, but its usual meaning. 

ENGLISH 

Three years of High School English or its equivalent is required 
for graduation in the shorthand course. 

CREDITS 

For credits given for work in the Commercial Department see 
Elective Units, page 17 of this catalog. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

The cost of text-books and stationery for the full business course 
varies from $10 to $13; blank books and forms are made to order from 
the best quality of paper. The cost of books, etc., for the course in 
shorthand is about $6.50, and for the course in penmanship about $5. 
The following text-books are used. 

Business Course 

Rowe's Bookkeeping and Accounting. 
20th Century Bookkeeping and Banking. 
Sadler-Rowe Commercial Arithmetic. 
Gano's Business Law. 
Zaner's Business Writing. 
Mayne's Modern Business Spelling. 
Baker's Correct English. How to use it. 
Boynton's School Civics. 
Belding's Commercial Correspondence. 



102 commercial department 

Shorthand Course 

Phonographic Amanuensis by Jerome B. Howard (Corresponding 
Style). 

Progressive Dictation Exercises by Jerome B. Howard. 

Eldridge's Shorthand Dictation Exercises. 

Rational Typewriting, by Ida McLeman Cutler and Rupert P. So 
Relle. 

Fritz-Eldridge Expert Typewriting. 

TIME REQUIRED 

To complete the Business course, the bright, ambitious student aver- 
ages about nine months, altho many remain longer. Students are 
advanced as rapidly as is consistent with thoro work. 

To become proficient in phonography, typewriting, etc., to fill a first- 
class situation acceptably, the average learner requires from five to 
eight months. Students acquainted with business forms, already well 
drilled in spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., have been prepared in 
three to five months sufficiently well to take fairly good positions. 
Unless compelled to do so by special circumstances, it is not advisable 
to rush unduly thru the work, as those who take a thoro course are 
practically certain of a higher salary and more permanent employment. 



FURTHER INFORMATION 



BUILDINGS 
The College building is neatly and comfortably furnished thruout 
and heated by steam. Nothing which can add to the comfort, conven- 
ience and utility of a first class school has been omitted in the general 
equipment. 

RECITATION HOURS 
The regular hours of study and recitations are from 8 a. m. to 4 
p. m., five days of the week. Regular hours each week are set aside 
for physical training in a well-equipped gymnasium. 

DISCIPLINE 
It is assumed that the young men who enter this institution are 
gentlemen, and they are treated uniformly as such. The development 
of other characteristics will immediatly sever the student's connection 
with the school. 

GRADUATION AND DIPLOMA 
The requirements for graduation in the different courses are simply 
sufficient to give a high standing to the courses and to insure the 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 103 

ability of graduates to fill and retain satisfactorily first class positions. 

In order to secure the degree of Graduate Accountant, or Master of 
Accounts, it is necessary to pass a grade of 80% in all final examina- 
tions except in spelling in which a grade of 90% is required. Students 
completing the Graduate Accountant course but failing to secure 80% 
in one or more subjects, will be given a diploma. In the Stenographic 
course, the average working speed of one hundred words per minute 
in Phonography for not less than 10 consecutive minutes and an 
average speed of not less than 40 words net per minute is required in 
typewriting. 

All degrees and diplomas will be awarded at the annual graduation 
exercises of the department during the commencement week. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limh so as to bring the advantages of a thoro 
business education within the reach of all. 

Rooms heated and furnished may be secured at the institution at 
from 60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $2.75 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for $4.50 to $5.50 a week. 

TUITION 
Graduate Accountant Course. 

Pall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 

By the week 2.00 

Annual Gymnasium Fee 1.00 

Stenographic Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 

By the week 2.00 

Annual Gymnasium Fee 1.00 

Master of Accounts Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $40.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 45.00 

School year, 36 weeks 75.00 

By the week 2.50 

Annual Gymnasium Fee 1.00 

Tuition for students not taking the regular course. 

Minimum charge $ 5.00 

One hour per day, Fall term 7.00- 



104 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

One hour per day, Spring term 8.50 

Two hours per day, Fall term 12.00 

Two hours per day, Spring term 14.00 

Three or more hours per day, full tuition. 

The charges for diplomas are as follows. 

Graduate Accountant $5.00 

Master of Accounts 5.00 

Stenographic Course 1.00 

Certificate upon completion of Graduate Accountant course with- 
out degree 1.00 

Library Fee. 

An annual Library fee of One Dollar is charged all students in this 
department. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES 

This department stands in the closest relationship with the other 
departments of Augustana College and Theological Seminary, and 
students in the Commercial Department may pursue any one study 
in the Academic or Normal Departments, either as visitors or as reg- 
ular members, without extra charge. This intimate connection cannot 
but act favorably upon all who take the business course, as it spurs 
them on to greater efforts, and broadens their view, by reminding 
them that all is not contained in the debits and credits of an account. 
Furthermore, a business man needs the ease and grace that come from 
contact with others; and this intermingling of a large number of well 
informed, zealous students, having various tastes and ambitions, and 
representing all parts of the United States, cannot but have much of 
the desired effect. Among the numerous societies at the College may 
be mentioned the Phrenokosmian and the Adelphic. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 
Instruction being largely individual, students may enter at any time 
during the school year. All applications for admission, or requests 
for further information, should be addressed to the President of the 
institution. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 105 



General Information 



GOVERNMENT 
Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned, supported, 
and controlled by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod. Its 
governing body is a Board of Directors, composed of the President of 
the Synod, the President of the institution, and sixteen members — 
eight ministers and eight laymen, elected by the Synod for a term of 
four years. The meetings of the Board are held at the institution. 

FACULTIES 

All matters pertaining to the institution as a whole which do not 
come under the jurisdiction of the Board of Directors or the President 
are in the hands of the General Faculty, which is composed of all the 
permanent professors of the institution. 

There are four Special Faculties in charge of the following depart- 
ments respectively: The Theological Seminary; the Collegiate, Aca- 
demic, and the Normal Departments; the Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art; the Commercial Department. 

The president of the institution is ex officio chairman of each faculty. 

DIVISION OF THE SCHOOL YEAR 
The school year of thirty-six weeks is divided into two terms: the 
Fall term, embracing a period of sixteen weeks (September — Decem- 
ber), and the Spring term, embracing a period of twenty weeks (Jan- 
uary — June) . 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Chapel services, which all students are required to attend, are held 
in the chapel every school-day morning. Divine services are held in 
the Chapel each Sunday evening during term-time. All students living 
at the college are expected to attend these services. General and class 
prayer-meetings are held each week by the students. 

REGULATIONS 

There are but few specific rules of government, as each student 
is expected to be exemplary in manners and morals, and to deport 
himself as becomes a student of a Christian institution. 

The attendance of such students only is desired as will make faithful 
use of the educational opportunities afforded. 



106 GENEBAL INFORMATION 

Intemperance, profanity, theater-going, playing at cards and billiards, 
and whatever hinders the highest mental, moral, and religious culture, 
or violates the courtesy due to instructors or fellow students, are 
prohibited. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limit, so as to bring the advantages of an education 
within the reach of all. The total necessary expenses for the entire 
school year range from $200 to $300. 

On application, heated and furnished rooms may be secured at from 
60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $2.75 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for from $4.50 to $5.50. 

All payments must be made in advance, and no money is refunded 
for unused tuition. 

A Matriculation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Academic, and Normal departments. 

A Graduation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Normal, and Music departments, and of $1 in the Commercial depart- 
ment. 

An annual Gymnasium Fee of $1 is required of all students in the 
Theological, Collegiate, Academic, Normal, and Commercial depart- 
ments. 

TUITION 

The tuition Fee in the various departments is as follows: 

Theological Seminary No tuition. 

;Fall term $20.00 

Spring term 25.00 

Fall term 16.00 

Spring term 20.00 

/Fall term 16.00 

Preparatory Department. . | gpring term ^ 

"First two years, Fall term 16.00 

Spring term 20.00 

Last two years, Fall term 17.00 

Spring term 23.00 

fFall term 30.00 

Spring term 35.00 

Per year 60.00 

A Library Fee is charged as follows: 

Academy, per term 1.00 

College and Seminary, per term 2.00 

Other departments (optional), per term 1.00 



Collegiate Department . . . 
Academic Department. . . 



Normal Department 



Commercial Department 



GENERAL INFORMATION 107 

Laboratory fees are charged as follows: 

Biology. 

Course 4 (Botany) $2.00 

Course 7 (Zoology) 2.00 

Course 8 (Physiology) 2.00 

Course 13 (Botany) 3.00 

Course 14 (Zoology) 3.00 

Course 14a (Physiology) 3.00 

Chemistry. 

Course 9 3.00 

Course 10 3.00 

Course 11 3.00 

Course 12 3.00 

Course 13 3.00 

Course 14a 3.00 

Course 14b 3.00 

Course 15 3.00 

Geology. 

Course 15a (Mineralogy) 2.00 

Course 16 (Geology) 2.00 

Physics. 

Course 9 2.00 

Course 10 2.00 

Course 15 3.00 

Course 16 3.00 



For single subjects the following charges are made: 

Pall term, per hour $1.00 

Spring term, per hour 1.25 

Pall term, per hour 2.00 

Spring term, per hour 2.50 

If a student enrolled in the Academy take eight hours or more of 
College studies, he shall pay college tuition. 



In the Academy 
In the College . . 



LADIES' HALL 
For the accomodation of lady students who prefer a home under the 
immediate auspices of the institution, a Ladies' Hall has been estab- 
lished. The rooms are carpeted, furnished, lighted, and heated, but 
each occupant is expected to provide herself with combs, toilet soap, 
towels, sheets, pillow cases, counterpane, blankets or a heavy com- 
forter, and curtains. The hall is under the supervision of Mrs. Olive 
Rydholm as Principal. 



108 GENEBAL INFOBMATION 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM 

MABCUS SKABSTEDT, A. M., B. L. S., LIBBABIAN. 

History. For many years the library occupied a single large room 
on the third floor of the main building of the institution. A portion 
of this room, divided off from the rest by a railing, and fitted up with 
tables and chairs, served as a reading room, while the rest was fitted 
up with wooden stacks for the storing of books. This arrangement 
served its purpose admirably for a number of years until the gradually 
accumulating collections made it more and more evident that the 
library was in sore need of larger and more adequate accomodations. 
In the opportune time this need was satisfied in a manner so fitting 
and beautiful as to exceed even the fondest dreams of those most 
interested in the literary collections of the institution. In the year 
1909 it was announced that the Denkmann family, for a long time close 
friends of the intsitution and of the principles upon which it is founded, 
had decided to erect upon the campus a library building costing not less 
than $100,000 as a fitting memorial to the memory of their parents and 
a gift to Augustana College and Theological Seminary. Work was 
begun upon the foundation almost immediately, and in the spring of 
1911 the building was completed at a total cost of about $208,000. In 
May of the same year, by the aid of the students and teaching force 
of the institution, the books were transferred from the old home to the 
new, and are now stored on the shelves of the magnificent building. 

Building. The building is a modernized version of the Italian renais- 
sance. It is built of the best quality of Missouri limestone, rests on 
a massive foundation of concrete, and is surmounted by a high tile 
roof. It is 120 feet long and 96 feet deep, and the major part of the 
building has three floors. The predominant characteristic in the plan 
of architecture, both as to the interior and the exterior, is that of 
massiveness. In addition to its architectural beauty the interior of 
the building possesses the advantage of very practical arrangement. 

The first floor contains the Memorial Hall, with Mosaic floor and 
walls lined with huge slabs of Italian marble; a lecture room with a 
seating capacity of about 150, and fitted with raised floor and all 
modern appliances for illustrated scientific lectures, etc.; and the 
administrative offices of the institution. From either side of the 
Memorial Hall large marble staircases lead to the second floor, on 
which are found the reading room, librarian's offices, etc. 

The reading room, extending the full length of the building, is pro- 
nounced one of the most beautiful and comfortable rooms of its kind 
in the country. The tables and other furnishings are in quartersawed 
oak and provide a seating capacity of about 200, while the shelving 
about the walls accomodates about 300 current periodicals and some 
3,000 reference volumes. Fronting each entrance is a large catalog 



GENERAL INFORMATION 109 

case, and above the rectangle formed by the catalog cases, the loan 
desk, and the doors leading to the offices and stacks, is a beautiful 
art-glass dome which receives its light from a skylight. The museum, 
just above the reading room, is fitted up with wall cases and floor 
cases for the preservation of collections, and this room receives its 
light from a row of skylights. 

The rear part of the building contains a basement which has the 
unpacking room, seven private study seminars, and rest rooms for 
ladies and men. The rest rooms for ladies has also a small room 
annexed which serves as a kitchen for those students who, because of 
distance, are prevented from taking lunch at home. Above the base- 
ment is the stack shaft providing room for four mezzanines, three of 
which are put in. The stacks are of Art Metal steel construction, and 
the mezzanines have glass floors. Above this shaft store rooms are 
provided for newspaper collections, etc. A portion of the first floor 
stacks is at present partitioned off and used as an alumni room. Here 
are kept the pictures, etc., of the various graduating classes. 

The building is equipped with the latest and most up-to-date heating, 
lighting, ventilating, and cleaning appliances. 

Collections. Starting with a nucleus of 5,000 volumes, chiefly his- 
torical works, presented to the library in 1862 by Charles XV, then 
king of Sweden, the library now possesses 22,220 volumes and 20,400 
pamphlets, the latter being chiefly scientific publications received in 
exchange for the Augustana Library Publications, of which seven have 
thus far been published. It has no special collections except a col- 
lection of books on missions which is constantly being increased thru 
the efforts of the Augustana Students' Foreign Mission Society. There 
is, however, connected with the library a collection of files of Swedish- 
American newspapers and other periodicals which is said to be one of 
the largest of its kind in the world. The library receives currently 
over 200 periodicals including local and Chicago newspapers, general 
and departmental American and foreign periodicals, all the more prom- 
inent Swedish-American newspapers, and many college publications. 

Provisions for growth. The growth of the library has been due 
largely to the generosity of friends. This is especially true of the 
many current periodicals which are regularly filed away. Altho the 
library has always suffered because of an unusually meager book fund, 
yet it feels grateful for the growth which in spite of that fact has 
been made possible thru the interest and kindness of a host of friends. 
A permanent book fund is now made possible by the fact that the 
library fee, paid by the students and other users of the library, is used 
exclusively for the purchase of books. The book fund was in 1912 
further favored by being made the recipient of a gift from Consul C. 
A. Smith of $25,000, the income of which is to be used only for the 



HO GENERAL INFORMATION 

purchase of books for the library. A further generous gift came to the 
library the same year when the Denkmann family turned over to it 
the sum of $700 to be used for binding periodicals for the reference 
shelves. During the last year there have been added to the library by 
purchase and gift 954 volumes and about 1,600 pamphlets 
The list of donors for the last year is as follows: 

Andreae, Percy 1 vols. 

Andreen, Gustav 4 

Association of American Portland cement manufacturers 1 

Augustana Book Concern .' 27 

Augustana College 1 

Augustana College Students' Union 2 

Baldwin, Mrs. J. R 22 

Bengston, C. J 3 

Benzon, Peter 10 

Brun, N. C 1 

Carnegie Endowment for International Peace 2 

Chase, Charles Crosby 1 

Chicago Commercial Club 1 

Commissioner General of Sweden, San Francisco 1 

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station 1 

Cook, Charles C 1 

Davenport Academy of Science 3 

Elmquist, O. A 1 

Elson, Henry W 2 

Engstrand, F. A 1 

Forsander, Nils 1 

Foss, C. W 11 

Harvard University 1 

Herman, Linus 13 

Howe, Miss Frances R 13 

Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics 1 

Illinois Education Department 1 

Illinois Efficiency and Economy Commission 1 

Illinois Geological Survey 3 

Illinois State Historical Library 3 

Illinois State Museum of Natural History 1 

Illinois University 3 

Iowa Academy of Science 10 

Iowa Horticultural Society 1 

Japan Society 1 

Kempe, Andrew 3 

Kronberg, S. J 1 

Larson, O. L 8 



GENERAL INFORMATION 111 

Legum, John 3 vols. 

Library of Congress 3 

Longmans, Green & Co 1 

Lutheran Church Work 1 

Mauritzson, J. G. U 1 

Michigan Board of Agriculture 2 

Michigan Historical Commission 1 

National Association of Manufacturers 1 

New York Agricultural Experiment Station 1 

New York Education Department 1 

New York Stock Exchange 1 

New York University 2 

Ohio Agricultural Experiment Station 1 

Olympic Club, Augustana College 2 

Peterson, August 2 

Rabenius, Mrs. H 26 

Revell, Fleming H. & Co 1 

Robb, William 1 

Rosenberger, J. L 1 

Sargent, Porter E 1 

Schuch, Edward 1 

Sebelius, S. J 2 

Smithsonian Institution 5 

Straus, Nathan 1 

Svenska Amerikanaren 36 

Sveriges geologiska undersokning 1 

Swan, G. N 3 

Swanson, Clarke 1 

Thompson, Slason 1 

U. S. Brewers' Association 1 

U. S. Government 29 

Waffle, O. G 1 

Washburn-Crosby Co 1 

Wasson, E. A 1 

Classification etc. The revised Dewey Decimal Classification is used 
for all the books, except that a special classification of religion is used 
for the books on religion. A dictionary card catalog is being made 
which enters all books in a single alphabet by author, title, and sub- 
ject or subjects. All current periodicals, all files of bound magazines 
of general interest, and several hundred general reference volumes 
are kept on the reading room shelves where they may be consulted 
without formality. An assorted collection of books on religion is also 
kept in the reading room. 

Use. The use of the library is open to anyone upon payment of 



112 GENEBAL INFOBMATTON 

the library fee. Books may be drawn for a period of two weeks with 
the privilege of renewal if necessary, and the library arrangements 
are such that students may do reference work under most favorable 
conditions. All books belonging to the library are kept in the library 
building, but generous arrangements are made with the several de- 
partments as regards reference books for laboratory use. The library 
and reading room are open every weekday from 7:45 a. m. to 9 p. m., 
except on Friday and Saturday, when they close at 6 p. m. The use 
of the library is subject to the rules, a copy of which may be had at 
the loan desk. 

Students of the institution have access also to the excellent city 
libraries of Rock Island, Moline, and Davenport. 

THE MUSEUM 

MABCUS SKABSTEDT, A. M., B. L. S., CUBATOB. 

The natural history collections formerly housed on the upper floor 
of the main building are now permanently located in the museum 
room of the Denkmann Memorial Library building. Ample space and 
opportunity are here given for the proper display of the collections. 

All of the various departments of natural history are quite well 
represented. Especially is this true of the geological department with 
its thousands of fossil and mineralogical specimens, and the zoological 
department containing hundreds of well preserved specimens of mam- 
mals, birds, reptiles, and fishes. 

The museum also contains valuable ethnographical collections from 
many parts of the world; a numismatic collection of over 1,200 repre- 
sentative coins and medals besides a large number of rare and valu- 
able notes and paper money; an excellent stamp collection; and a col- 
lection of rare and interesting books and manuscripts. 

It has many miscellaneous articles and specimens of particular 
interest. 

The museum has been benefited greatly during the past year thru 
the generosity of the following persons: Eric Anderson, A. Arvidson, 
O. O. Eckardt, Grant Hultberg, O. L. Larson, C. E. Lindberg, Carl G. 
Londberg, C. A. Lundberg, A. B. Olson, Albertina Rodell, and Gustaf 
Roos. 

There are no regular museum hours, but those desiring to examine 
the collections may gain permission to do so by applying to the curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 
This department is located on the third floor of the main college 
building, occupying the space which was formerly devoted to the 
Library and the Museum. During the summer of 1911 these quarters 
were entirely remodeled and converted into laboratory and recitation 
rooms for the department of Biology and Geology. There are in all 



GENEBAL INFORMATION 113 

five rooms. On the south side is a spacious biological laboratory, 
adjoining which is a supply room. Facing the north are two rooms, 
one, a lecture room, and the other a laboratory for advanced work. 
The north and south rooms are separated by a hall at the rear of 
which is the instructor's private room. The laboratories are provided 
with water, gas and electricity. They are equipped with models, 
charts, apparatus and sinks; also chemicals, rocks, minerals and 
preserved materials for use in the various laboratory courses. The 
biological equipment is added to year by year. 

THE LABORATORY OP PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 
The departments of physics and chemistry are at present housed 
in Ericson Hall, a two-story brick structure situated north of the main 
buildings. The first floor is devoted to physics and contains a lecture 
room seating twenty-five students, and a physics laboratory provided 
with work tables for about the same number of students working at 
one time. The apparatus cases are stocked for lecture demonstrations 
and individual laboratory work in elementary and advanced physics. 
The chemical department occupies the second floor which consists 
of a lecture room seating twenty-five students, a laboratory for ele- 
mentary and advanced work, a balance room, and store room. The 
laboratory has work tables for forty students working at one time and 
is supplied with gas, electric current, draft hoods, etc. This depart- 
ment has recently received a considerable addition of apparatus and 
equipment both for elementary and advanced work. A room in the 
basement has been fitted up for work in assaying and metallurgy. 

THE HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS AND THE ARCHIVES 

PROF. C. W. FOSS, GUARDIAN AND ARCHIVIST 

Ethnographical and Numismatic 

The Ethnographical Collection contains numerous and valuable speci- 
mens from India, Africa, Palestine and Persia; relics of the late war; 
and implements, weapons, amulets, and personal ornaments of the 
American Indians. 

The Numismatic Collection consists of numerous specimens of gold, 
silver, copper, and bronze coins, together with medals and tokens. 
There is also a large collection of postage and revenue stamps, old 
paper money, fractional currency, foreign and Confederate notes, and 
continental and colonial paper money. 

Historical 
The Historical Collection of American Lutheran and Scandinavian 
American Literature has been steadily growing during the year. Com- 
plete and nearly complete files of the leading American Lutheran 



114 GEXEEAL INFORM ATION 

periodicals (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, 
and Finnish) have been secured and carefully arranged, also files of 
most of the Swedish-American periodicals. 

Contributions to this collection are kindly solicited. Books, period- 
icals, pamphlets, catalogs, minutes of synods and conferences, and 
whatever pertains to the history of the Lutheran Church in America 
or to the history of the Scandinavians in this country will be thank- 
fully received. 

There are now something over six hundred different papers and 
periodicals in the Swedish-American and American Lutheran collec- 
tions taken together. These papers are all arranged in volumes and 
filed away in suitable cases and cataloged so that any one wishing to 
consult some particular number of any periodical can do so at a 
moment's notice by applying to the Archivist. 

There are also large collections of duplicates. Parties wishing to 
complete their files may secure them either by purchase or by fair 
exchange. 

An interesting collection is that of the local church papers or young 
people's papers. But this collection is not nearly complete. It is 
hoped that pastors and young people's societies will kindly send in 
their papers, if possible from the first issue. Large numbers of them 
have been received during the present year. 

For contributions to this department our thanks are due to the fol- 
lowing persons: Dr. C. E. Lindberg, Augustana Theological Seminary; 
Augustana missionaries in China; Rev. and Mrs. C. W. Landahl, Tar- 
pingtien, China; Rev. P. J. Reinertsen, Elk Point, S. D.; Rev. J. W. 
Nywall, Idaho Falls, Ida.; Rev. and Mrs. 0. 0. Eckardt, Rajahmundry, 
India; Rev. F. A. Johnsson, Galesburg, 111.; Karl P. Silberg, Augustana 
College; Prof. A. R. Wallin, Augustana College; Augustana Book Con- 
cern, Rock Island, 111.; Secretaries of various Lutheran Synods and 
Conferences, Lutheran Colleges, Seminaries, Academies, Orphan Homes 
Hospitals, etc.; Publishers of newspapers and periodicals, as the fol 
lowing: Augustana, Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter, Svenska Amerikana 
ren, Kuriren, Monitoren, Omaha Posten, Vart Land, Svenska Vecko 
posten, Skandinavia, Iowa Posten, Svenska Amerikanska Vastern 
Pacific Tribune, Nordstjernan, Minnesota Stats Tidning, Svenska Fol 
kets Tidning, Svenska Amerikanska Posten, Sandebudet, Chicago 
Bladet, Utah Korrespondenten, Svea, Utah-Posten, Medborgaren, Mis 
sions-Vannen, Svenska Amerikanska Tribunen, Nya Veckoposten 
Finska Amerikanaren, Skandia, Svenska Tidningen Canada, Lindsborgs 
Posten, Lindsborg Record, Marinette Tribunen, Svenska Posten, Arbe 
taren, Texas Posten, Swedish Pacific Press, Svenska Nordvastern 
California Veckoblad, Duluth Posten, Musik Tidning, For Svenska Hem 
The Lutheran Herald, The Lutheran, The United Lutheran, The Lu 



GENERAL INFORMATION 115 

theran Guide, The Lutheran Companion, The Lutheran Standard, The 
Lutheran Church Work, The Lutheran Mission Worker, Young Folks, 
Foreign Missionary, The Lutheran Observer, Lutheran Church Visitor, 
Der Lutheraner, Lehre und Wehre, Kirchenblatt, Kirchen-Zeitung, 
Missions-Bote, Missions-Taube, Kinder und Jugendblatt, Kirchliche 
Zeitschrift, Danskeren, Ev. Luth. Kirketidende, Lutheraneren, and 
others. 

Contributions to these collections should be sent to the Guardian of 
the Historical Collection, Prof. C. W. Foss, Rock Island, 111. 

THE AUGUSTANA OBSERVER 

The Augustana Observer is a monthly paper published by the Lyceum, 
and is self-supporting. Its aim is not only to strengthen the bonds of 
comradeship between the students, but also to keep the alumni and 
friends of Augustana in touch with the life and work of the institution. 
The editorial staff is composed of representatives from the various 
departments, with one associate editor from the factulty. 

The subscription price is 75 cents per annum, single copies 10 cents. 
Sample copies may be had on application. 
The following are the members of the staff for the year 1916. 

Elmer T. Peterson, '17 Editor in chief 

Emil J. Johnson, '17 Business Manager 

Allan Eddy, '18, and Harry Wisen, '20, Ass't Business Managers 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Dr. E. F. Bartholomew Faculty 

Vincent Nordgren, '17 College 

Harry Wisen Academy 

L. E. Jones, '15 Alumni 

Herbert Swanson, '14 Seminary 

Bertha Bertell Conservatory 

George Palm Commercial 

Gerda Hiller, '17 Society 

Karl P. Silberg, '17 Exchanges 

Arthur Swedberg, '17 Athletics 

Roy V. Peel, '19 Observatory 

THE STUDENTS' UNION 

The Students' Union of Augustana College and Theological Seminary 
was organized Nov. 5, 1892, for the purpose of uniting all the students 
of the institution in one body. A student enrolled in any department 
of the institution, and paying the assessment levied, is a member of 
the organization. Business of general interest to the student body is 



116 GENERAL INFORMATION 

transacted. The annual meeting is held on the third Tuesday in May. 
Special meetings are held whenever occasion requires it. 

OFFICERS 

President, Gustav E. Nelson. 
Secretary, Rudolph Hanson. 
Treasurer, Nils Pearson. 

THE AUGUSTANA FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY 

Organized by students in 1886 and incorporated in 1895, this society 
has had a steady growth, and is now strong numerically, numbering 
among its members not only students but also professors of the insti- 
tution and ministers and laymen of the Synod. 

Its aim is to arouse and maintain, especially among the students, a 
lively interest in the extension of God's kingdom in heathen lands, and, 
by means of membership fees, contributions, etc., to render pecuniary 
aid to the Synod in its foreign mission work. 

At the institution the society furnishes mission literature, arranges 
lectures and conducts mission study classes, one large class which 
meets Sunday afternoon, and several smaller classes which meet some 
hour during the week. Members of the society also visit congregations 
and conduct services in the interest of the mission cause. 

Every member who has paid $10 in membership fees becomes a life 
member. 

During the past year the society has gathered $2,047.84 for missions. 
This year $600 is given to the General Council's mission in India, $600 
to the Augustana Synod's mission in China, and $400 to the misssion 
in Porto Rico. 

The officers are: Herbert C. M. Swanson, President; Arthur E. Olson, 
Vice President; John A. Martin, Secretary; Dr. Carl A. Blomgren, 
Treasurer. The treasurer's address is 825 — 35th St., Rock Island, 111. 

THE PHRENOKOSMIAN SOCIETY 
This is the oldest society at the institution and was organized in 
1860 in Chicago, 111., where the institution was then located. Its object 
is to further the literary improvement and intellectual development 
of its members. The meetings, which are held on Friday evening of 
each week, are conducted in the English and Swedish languages alter- 
nately, and begin with devotional exercises. The programs, consisting 
of essays, debates, orations, declamations, music, criticism, etc., are 
interesting and instructive. A weekly paper, The Phrenokosmian, is 
published by the society, and read at every regular meeting. Students 
from any department of the institution may become members of the 
society, and upon leaving the school they become honorary members. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 117 

THE ADELPHIC SOCIETY 

This is the younger of the two prominent literary societies of the 
institution. It was organized in 1883, and incorporated in 1884. The 
society holds its meetings on Friday evening of each week. The exer- 
cises are conducted in the English language and consist of essays, 
orations, declamations, debates, music, etc. These exercises aim to 
supplement the class-room work by promoting culture and fostering 
a fraternal spirit among its members. The various officers are elected 
each month, thus affording all an opportunity for practise in conducting 
public meetings. The society also publishes a paper, The Censor, con- 
taining articles on subjects of general interest, college news, etc. All 
students of the institution are eligible to membership in the society. 

The Adelphic Orchestra, organized for the purpose of filling a long- 
felt need within the society, not only takes an active part in the reg- 
ular programs of the society, but plays a prominent role in college 
activities in general. 

The Adelphic Society is a charter member of the Illinois Intercol- 
legiate Association of Literary Societies, composed of literary societies 
representing the universities as well as the most prominent colleges 
in Illinois. 

THE CONCORDIA SOCIETY 

This society was organized February 4, 1898, by students of the 
Theological Seminary. The aim of the society is the promotion of 
Evangelical Lutheran Theological culture, and the strengthening of 
Evangelical Lutheran faith. 

Every student of the Theological Seminary is eligible to membership. 
The society has met, during the school year, every other Friday after- 
noon, when programs, consisting of discussions, or lectures by specially 
invited speakers, have been rendered. 

THE LYCEUM 
The Lyceum is composed of the three leading literary societies of 
the institution, namely: the Phrenokosmian, the Adelphic, and the 
Concordia. Its general object is to promote the literary interests of 
the institution. The Lyceum publishes "The Augustana Observer." 
During the school-year a lecture course of twelve numbers has been 
successfully carried out. 

SVENSKA VITTERHETSSaLLSKAPET 
This society was organized in the fall of the year 1896 for the study 
of Swedish literature and culture. Its membership is limited to eigh- 
teen, and unanimity is required for election. The society meets once 
a month for literary discussions, reading of essays, criticism, and 
original productions. 



118 GENERAL INFORMATION 

TEGNfiR-FoRBUNDET 
This society was organized April 4, 1901, for the study of Swedish 
literature. Only those students who have a good knowledge of Swedish 
and show interest in the language and literature of Sweden are eligible 
to membership. Meetings are held twice a month. The society pub- 
lishes a monthly, Tomten. 

IDUNA 
The Iduna Society was organized by the members of the Second 
Class Academy, November 21, 1902. The purpose of the society is to 
promote the use of the Swedish language among the younger students. 
All students are eligible to membership. Meetings are held once a 
week. The society publishes a monthly called Iduna. 

OLOV RUDBECK 

This society was organized April 4, 1910, for the study of Swedish . 
literature, art, and culture. Its membership is limited to twelve and 
unanimity is required for election. Only students who have a good 
knowledge of Swedish and show interest in the language and literature 
of Sweden are eligible. 

The society meets twice a month. Its studies are conducted in the 
manner of a Seminar class under the direction of the professor of the 
Swedish language and literature. 

DEBATING CLUBS 

Besides the above named literary societies, there are the five follow- 
ing debating clubs: 

The Gladstone Debating Club, organized 1893. The membership is 
limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Webster Debating Club, organized in 1902. The membership is 
limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Torgny Debating Club, organized in the fall of 1904. This is a 
Swedish debating club. The membership is limited to eighteen. Week- 
ly meetings are held. 

The Balfour Debating Club, organized in 1905. The membership is 
limited to eighteen. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Edward Everett Debating Club, organized in 1913. The mem- 
bership is limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

THE DEBATING BOARD OF CONTROL 
The Debating Board of Control, established by the Board of Directors 
upon petition of the Debating League during the past year, has charge 
of all matters pertaining to intercollegiate and interclub debates. 
Membership of the Board is made up of the President and Treasurer 



GENERAL INFORMATION 119 

of the institution, one member of the Board of Directors, two members 
of the general faculty, and four student members, nominated by the 
several debating clubs and elected by the Debating League. During 
the past year the following have served on this Board: Dr. G. A. 
Andreen and Prof. A. Kempe, ex officio members; Rev. A. F. Bergstrom, 
representing the Board of Directors; Dr. E. F. Bartholomew and Dr. 
C. W. Foss, representing the general faculty; Helen Reinemund (Ed- 
ward Everett), George Engdahl (Balfour), Alvin Lugn (Gladstone), 
and Clarence Granlund (Webster), representing the Debating League. 

Officers 
President, Dr. G. A. Andreen. 
Secretary, Clarence Granlund. 
Treasurer, Prof. A. Kempe. 

AUGUSTANA DEBATING LEAGUE 
The Debating League consists of the Webster, Balfour, Gladstone 
and Edward Everett debating clubs. It is an advisory body to the 
Debating Board of Control. 

Officers 
President, Gladys Dunleavy. 
Secretary, Helen Reinemund. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING 
Roy Monroe Conrad, B. S., 

DIRECTOR OF GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS 

For the physical training and development of students there is pro- 
vided a moderately well equipped gymnasium. It is well heated and 
lighted, the main floor being the gymnasium proper. In the basement 
there are shower-baths and locker rooms. The locker rooms are well 
equipped with new steel lockers. In this building a systematic course 
of training is pursued, the aim of which is to train the student so that 
every part of the physical being may be well developed. The exercises 
that are given are of such a character that all are able to do them. 
They are as follows: marching, maze running, free hand calisthenics, 
dum bell work, floor work, light apparatus work and games. 

Careful attention is given to the physical condition of the students 
and no one is allowed to engage in any excessive exercise or to attempt 
anything which is likely to be attended with risk. Before entering 
any of the classes each student is required to undergo a physical ex- 
amination by a competent physician. 

For outdoor athletics, Ericson field furnishes ample room for base- 
ball and track and field athletics. On other parts of the campus are 
found tennis courts. 



120 GENERAL INFORMATION 

To meet the requirements in physical training students are required 
to take at least two hours' prescribed exercise per week under the 
direction of the instructor, for which one credit will be given. 

THE AUGUSTANA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
As a result of a resolution adopted by the Synod at its meeting in 
Rock Island in June, 1910, inter-collegiate athletic relations, except as 
regards football, have been resumed at Augustana College. All inter- 
collegiate games and contests are under the direction of a Board of 
Control, whose duty it is to arrange schedules for games and to en- 
force the eligibility rules of the institution. 

AUGUSTANA PROHIBITION LEAGUE 
This league was organized February 13, 1911, to promote broad 
and practical study of the liquor problem and related social and 
political questions, to advance the principles of prohibition and secure 
the enlistment of students for service and leadership in the overthrow 
of the liquor traffic. This organization is affiliated with the Inter- 
collegiate Prohibition Association but has no connection with any 
political party. It provides several temperance programs during the 
year and holds a local oratorical contest annually, the winner of this 
contest representing Augustana in the State contest. Any student is 
eligible to membership. 

Officers 

President, Emil J. Johnson. 

Vice President, Elmer T. Peterson. 

Secretary, Gustav E. Nelson. 

Treasurer, Simon Fagerstrom. 

Reporters, Arthur G. Benson, George Engdahl. 

THE LUTHER BIBLE SOCIETY 
The Luther Bible Society was organized in 1913 for the study of the 
Bible. The membership is limited to eighteen and unanimity is re- 
quired for election. Only students who show that they are interested 
in Bible study are eligible for membership. The society meets every 
Sunday evening at 6 o'clock. The studies are conducted under the 
leadership of the members, each leading in turn. At frequent intervals 
the society endeavors to hold lectures on different phases of Bible 
study, at which times the meetings are open to all. The aim of the 
society is to make its members more interested in Bible study and to 
make them more familiar with the Bible. The organization fills a long 
felt need and during the past year has been very active. Its officers are: 

C. Geo. Engdahl, President. 

Clarance Granlund, Vice President. 

Arthur Almquist, Sec'y-Treas. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 121 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 
AUGUSTANA COLLEGE BAND 
This band was organized in 1874. Students and others who are pro- 
ficient on some band instrument are admitted, upon application, as 
members. Applications are made to the director, and upon recom- 
mendation, candidates are admitted by a two-thirds vote of the Band. 
Rehearsals are held every Monday evening from 7 to 9 o'clock under 
the direction of Director Carl H. Kalquist. 

Officers 
Director, Carl H. Kalquist 
President, Hjalmar Fryxell 
Vice President, Arthur Sprecher 
Secretary, Virgilius Ferm 
Treasurer, Carl Swanson 
Curator, Alvin Lugn 
Manager, Hjalmar Fryxell 

Roster 
Solo Cornets — Carl H. Kalquist, V. Frykman, Elmer E. Swanson, Martin 

Trued. 
First Cornet — Virgilius Ferm. 

Second Cornets — Andrew Danielson, Robert Poison. 
Flute— Arion Monell. 
Piccolos, Paul Johnson, Hugo Larson. 
Solo Clarinet — Hjalmar Fryxell. 
First Clarinet — Carl Lindahl. 

Second Clarinets — R. M. Conrad, Eskil Hawkins, Alexander Elmblad. 
E Flat Clarinet— P. H. Darling. 

Altos — Edgar Johnson, Emil J. Johnson, A. Berggren. 
Saxaphones — A. Sprecher, Theo. Lenz, Erwin Sailer. 
Trombones — Martin Dahlberg, C. L. Trued. 
Baritones — Harry Hull, Alvin Lugn, E. T. Johnson. 
E Flat Bass — Anders Nelson. 
BB Flat Bass — Hugo Gibson. 
Snare Drum — Elmer T. Peterson. 
Bass Drum — Carl A. Swanson. 

THE AUGUSTANA ORCHESTRA 

The object of this organization is to study standard works of the 
older as well as of the more modern composers, giving players who 
possess sufficient command of some orchestral instrument excellent 
opportunities for ensemble practise. Among the more important num- 
bers in the repertoire of the orchestra are the following: 



122 GENERAL INFORMATION 

Symphonies: Haydn's Military; Mozart's Jupiter; and Beethoven's 
D major, No. 2. 

Overtures: Schubert's Rosamunde; Mozart's Die Entfiihrung; Her- 
old's Zampa; Suppe's Poet and Peasant; Rossini's Barber of Seville; 
Nicolai's Merry Wives of Windsor. 

Advanced students in the vocal or instrumental departments of the 
institution are given the privilege of singing or playing with the 
orchestra at stated intervals during the year. 

Members 
Director — Prof. Albert Anker. 
First Violins — Harry Kalquist, Hjalmar Fryxell, Helen Peterson, Mabel 

Bohman, Charles Olson, Wava Lindstrom. 
Second Violins — Helga Granere, Leona Haywood, Carl Holmen, William 

Larson, Arthur Musson, Chester Olson, C. O. Rumland. 
Violas — Hulda Peterson, Erwin Sailer. 
Cellos — Bessie Friestat, R. C. Lyons. 
Basses — J. Tripp, Steve Ruefer. 
Flutes — Hugo Gibson, Eskil Hawkins. 
Clarinets — L. W. Kling, Philip Darling. 
Cornets — Martin Trued, Virgilius Ferm. 
Horns — Earnest Herrstrum, Lawrence Swanson. 
Oboe— E. M. Star. 

Trombones — Martin Dahlberg, Clarence Trued. 
Drums — Elmer Peterson. 

THE AUGUSTANA CHAMBER MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 
The director of the Violin department has organized at the College 
a string quartet, a string trio, and a piano trio for the purpose of study- 
ing the classic masterpieces in the department of chamber music 
During the year the following compositions have been studied and per 
formed: 

Trio in C — Piano, violin, and cello Haydn 

String Trio No. 1 Pergolesi 

String Trio No. 5 J. Stamitz 

String Quartet — Selections from Schubert and Bacherini 
Clarinet Quintet Mozart 

THE HANDEL ORATORIO SOCIETY 
In January, 1881, Dr. O. Olsson gathered together at Augustana 
College the first oratorio society in this section of the Mississippi Val- 
ley, having as its object the study and rendering of oratorio works. 
The society then organized has continued in existence, in one form 
or another, till the present time. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 123 

From the founding of the oratorio society to the present day the 
following persons have served as leaders of the chorus: Joseph Osborn, 
P. A. Edquist, Jas. Moody, Dr. G. Stolpe, G. E. Griffith, V. Tengwald, 
A. D. Bodfors, F. E. Peterson, Christian Oelschlagel, Emil Larson, 
Mrs. Edla Lund, and J. Victor Bergquist. Following are some of the 
works rendered: Handel's Messiah, Haydn's Creation, Spohr's Last 
Judgement, Gaul's Holy City, Gade's Zion, Bach's God's Time is Best, 
Cowen's Song of Thanksgiving, Stolpe's Reformation Cantata, Wenner- 
berg's Psalms of David, and Christmas Oratorio, Farmer's Mass, Men- 
delssohn's Elijah, Stainer's Daughter of Jairus, Bennet's Woman of 
Samaria, Coomb's The Vision of St. John, Patton's Isaiah, Bergquist's 
Golgotha, etc. 

During the present year two concerts have been given, one on March 
2, when a large chorus called the Hasselquist Memorial Chorus ren- 
dered selections from Wennerberg's David's Psalms and Handel's Mes- 
siah. The second concert was given April 11, when the oratorio King 
Olaf by Karl Busch was rendered under the directorship of Prof. J. 
Victor Bergquist. 

Officers 

Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist 

President, Dr. G. A. Andreen 

Vice President, Sigurd Hanson 

Secretary, Amy Granlund 

Librarian, Constant Johnson 

Members 
Sopranos — Amy Anderson, Mabel Bergquist, Bertha Bertell, Lillie Cer- 

vin, Amanda Eastberg, Martha Foss, Emelia Jacobson, Mrs. Kraft, 

Olga Larson, Esther Lindell, Mrs. Martin, Esther Peterson, Naomi 

Peterson, Regina Rosenberg, Etta Setterdahl. 
Altos — Althea Brown, Rosalie Tragordh, Amy Granlund, Inez Gull, 

Gerda Hiller, Effie Johnson, Lael Johnson, Mabel Leaf, Edith Moll, 

Eva Swedberg. 
Tenors — Swante Anderson, Hjalmar Bergh, Vernon Erickson, Carl H. 

Freeman, Clarence Granlund, Gustaf Henry, Carl A. Johnson, 

Constant Johnson, Herbert Nordlander, Rudolph Swanson. 
Basses — John Billdt, Carl Bostrom, Paul Engstrand, Frank Granquist, 

Oscar Gustafson, Sigurd Hanson, Eskil Hawkins, Reuben Kron, 

Anders Nelson, Carl Odell, Carl Olson, Harry Olson, Wilbur Palm- 

quist, Arthur Swedberg, Levin Trued. 

THE WENNERBERG MALE CHORUS 
This chorus was organized in 1901 and is the Glee club par excel- 
lence of the institution. Its primary object is the promotion of high- 
class male chorus singing, the repertoire consisting of selections from 



124 GENERAL INFORMATION 

standard Swedish, English and American composers. The chorus has 
during the last few years made annual concert tours thruout the central 
part of the Synod's territory. This year it extended its tour thru parts 
of Michigan, Illinois, and Indiana. 

Officers 
Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist 
President, G. W. Henry 
Vice President, Clarence 0. Granlund 
Recording Secretary, Carl A. Swanson 
Treasurer, Hugo E. Gibson 
Manager, Andrew Kempe 
Assistant Manager, Theodore Rydback 
Curator, Hjalmar Bergh 
Accompanist, Martin Dahlberg 

Members 
First Tenors — Hjalmar Bergh, G. W. Henry, Herbert Nordlander, Carl 

Swanson, Hugo E. Gibson, Karl H. Freeman. 
Second Tenors — Theodore Rydback, Clarence O. Granlund, Constant 

Johnson, Vernon A. Erickson. 
First Basses — Martin Dahlberg, Virgilius Ferm, Eskil T. Hawkins, 

Elmer T. Peterson. 
Second Basses — Paul Engstrand, Paul Randolph, Arthur V. Swedberg, 

Anders W. Nelson, Wilbur X. Palmquist, Emil L. Johnson. 

LUTHERMAN CHORUS 

This chorus was organized in 1902. It has since that time rendered 
good service to the Mission Society by singing at the Sunday afternoon 
meetings of the Mission Study Class, and also at the public Mission 
services. In the fall of 1908 the name of the chorus was changed from 
'The Mission Chorus" to "The Lutherman Chorus." The membership 
is limited to 24. 

Officers 

Director, Clarence Trued 

President, Alvin Lugn 

Vice President, A. E. Olson 

Secretary, A. Almquist 

Treasurer, J. Forsberg 

Librarian, A. E. Olson 

Sergeants at Arms, Ture Wisen, Arion Monell. 

Members 
First Tenors — Martin Trued, Rudolph Hanson, A. Elmblad, J. Forsberg, 
Glen Samuelson. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 125 

Second Tenors — A. Almquist, C. A. Johnson, T. L. Johnson, Rudolph 

Swanson, C. A. Johnson, Ewald Palmer. 
First Basses — L. Sodergren, O. Ecklund, A. E. Olson, Ture Wisen, Elmer 

Benson, Arion Monell. 
Second Basses — J. Billdt, A. L. Lugn, T. Lenz, H. Olson, E. Forsling, 

R. Palmer. 

THE CLEF CLUB 
The Clef Club was organized in 1913. Since then it has had a rapid 
growth. The programs are given mainly by members of the Conserva- 
tory, but every one is invited to attend its programs. Some very inter- 
esting programs have been given, such as music from the Bohemian 
Girl, Swedish music (in costume), Christmas music, etc. Meetings 
are held each Friday at 4 p. m. 

Officers 
President, Helen Parker 
Vice President, Ethel Bengston 
Secretary, Amy Granlund 
Treasurer, Eleanor Bengtson 

THE VESPER OCTET 

This octet has sung at chapel services of Sunday evenings. The 
names of the members are: 

Amy Anderson, Esther Lindell, Gerda Hiller, Lael Johnson (Sec'y), 
Constant Johnson, Clarence Granlund, Wilbur Palmquist, Paul Eng- 
strand, Amy Granlund (Organist). 

Miss Amy Granlund and Miss Ethel Bengtson have presided at the 
organ at Sunday evening services during the school year 1915 — 16. 

THE ORIOLE CLUB 
This club was organized in 1915 under the direction of Prof. Arvid 
Samuelson and fills a long felt want among the ladies. They have as 
their object the procuring of a new pipe organ for Augustana. This 
year several concerts were given in neighboring places. 

Officers 
Director, Prof. Arvid Samuelson 
President, Helen I. Parker 
Vice President, Olga Larson 
Secretary-Treasurer, Helen Peterson 
Business Manager, Amy Granlund 
Historian, Edith Johnson 
Librarian, Lola Barker 
Accompanist, Bertha Bertell 



126 general information 

Members 
Lola Barker, Eleanor Bengtson, Ethel Bengston, Mabel Bergquist, 
Bertha Bertell, Ruth Carlmark, Beata Eberhardt, Olga Edlen, Amy 
Granlund, Inez Gull, Amelia Jacobson, Edith Johnson, Effie Johnson, 
Lael Johnson, .Ruth Johnson, Esther Lindell, Olga Larson, Helen 
Parker, Helen Peterson, Mabel Peterson, Naomi Peterson, Eva Swed- 
berg. 

THE ENDOWMENT FUND SOCIETY 

The Augustana College and Theological Seminary Endowment Fund 
Society was organized in the spring of 1894, and chartered by the State 
of Illinois. Its object, as its name implies, is to secure endowments 
for this institution. Its active members are, for the most part, ladies 
living in Rock Island and Moline, tho any lady paying the sum af 
$1. 20 annually and subscribing to the society's constitution is eligible 
to membership. Its honorary members pay one dollar annually or 
ten dollars at one time for life membership and are found in almost 
every part of the Synod. All moneys secured by the society are con- 
scientiously cared for, and invested and loaned out on first class secu- 
rities only. 

The society has received a number of substantial gifts from various 
sources, but the greater part of its funds is made up of membership 
fees, and now, at the close of its twenty-second fiscal year, it has to its 
credit the sum of $9,163.43. 

While pursuing its original object of gathering an endowment, the 
society has endeavored to maintain a social standing and a level of 
culture in keeping with the dignity of such an organization. 

For a number of years informal programs have been given at the 
meetings, while nine years ago its first year-book was published, 
giving programs with topics and dates of meetings, hostesses for each, 
together with other information valuable to the society. Since then 
the year-book has been issued regularly and has contributed much 
toward the permanency and development of the society. 

Contributions, donations, and bequests are hereby solicited. They 
should be sent to the General Treasurer, Mrs. Mauritz Johnson, 707 
Thirty-eighth Street, Rock Island, 111. 

President, Mrs. C. W. Foss, Vice President, Mrs. L. G. Abrahamson, 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. A. R. Wallin, Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. 
O. V. Holmgrain, Treasurer, Miss Etta Setterdahl, General Treasurer, 
Mrs. Mauritz Johnson, Organizer of Auxiliary Societies, Prof. A. Kempe, 
Auditing Committee: Miss Josephine Peetz, Miss Anna Olsson, Mrs. 
Geo. W. Johnson. Year-Book Committee: Mrs. Wm. Gamble, Mrs. J. V. 
Bergquist, Miss Martha Foss. Nominating Committee: Mrs. A. F. 
Pierson, Mrs. E. W. Olson, Miss Emily Anderson. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 127 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of Augustana College was organized by the 
first graduating class of the College in the spring of 1877. With a very 
few exceptions all the alumni are enrolled as members. Its objects 
are promoting of literary and scientific culture, especially in the halls 
of Alma Mater, the reunion of early friends and colaborers in literary 
pursuits, and the revival of the pleasant associations that entwine 
themselves about student life. The association holds its annual meet- 
ing on Commencement day. 

Some five years ago the Association began the work of soliciting 
contributions among the members toward a fund to be known as the 
Alumni Scholarship Fund. Approximately one in ten of the alumni 
have responded so far, and the fund is now about $625, with pledges 
aggregating $100 still to be redeemed. When the fund shall have 
reached $1,000, the interest will be available for the promotion of 
scholarship at Augustana. 

Officers 

President, Prof. C. J. Sodergren 

First Vice President, Rev. Carl Lorimer 

Second Vice President, Anna Olsson 

Third Vice President, Prof. I. M. Anderson 

Recording Secretary, Agnes Abrahamson 

Treasurer, Carl Londberg. 

THE STUDENTS' AID FUND OF AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This fund has recently been established by the Synod to aid needy 
students who are preparing for the ministry. Applications for aid may 
be handed in at any time to the committee which has charge of this 
fund. The committee is appointed by the Synod and consists of the 
professors of the Theological Seminary and four professors from the 
College. 
The following rules have been adopted by the committee: 
Art. I. Regular students in the Theological Seminary, also regular 
students in the Academy or in the College, who are preparing for the 
ministry and who are in need, may receive aid from this fund, but a 
student in the Academy or College in order to receive aid: 

a) Must have pursued studies one school-year at the institution with 
marked intelligence and good deportment. 

b) Must present to the committee a written testimonial from his 
pastor as to his character and Christian life. 

c) Must have in view entering the Theological Seminary after grad- 
uation from the College. 



128 GENERAL INFOBMATION 

Art. II. a) The amounts paid shall not exceed ten dollars per 
month to each student, and $90 shall be the limit of loans granted 
during any 24 months to any one student. 

b) A beneficiary student of this fund shall upon the completion of 
his Seminary course, or if he decides to enter some other profession, 
then immediately and in any case before he leaves the institution, give 
a note covering the full amount of aid received by him from this fund; 
such note to be payable to the Students' Aid Fund, and bearing interest 
at the rate of 2 per cent, the first year, 3 per cent, the second year, 
4 per cent, the third year, 6 per cent, for subsequent years after 
date. All notes become due 3 years after the ordination of the bene- 
ficiary. 

Art. III. Donations to this fund of one hundred dollars or larger 
amounts shall be deposited in a Savings Bank as a permanent fund 
of which the interest alone may be used. 

Art. IV. Additions or amendments to these rules may be made by 
a unanimous vote of the entire committee in charge of the Students' 
Aid Fund. 

THE MRS. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 
In memory of his wife Johanna Charlotta, who died January 30, 
1909, Professor DR. N. Forsander has donated to Augustana College 
and Theological Seminary the sum of one thousand dollars to be 
known as the Mrs. N. Forsander Scholarship. The annual proceeds of 
this fund shall be given to some students of this Theological Seminary, 
who is well known as an earnest Christian both in faith and life, as 
a diligent student especially in Church History, and as having gifts 
for ministerial work. 

THE O. H. THORSTENBERG SCHOLARSHIP 
Mr. O. H. Thorstenberg of Assaria, Kansas, donated by will one 
thousand dollars to the institution to establish a scholarship, the an- 
nual income of which is to be used to assist some worthy student, 
male or female, who intends to serve the Church as pastor, teacher or 
organist. 

THE ANNA WESTMAN STIPEND 
On February 10, 1911, the sum of fifty dollars was received by the 
College faculty, accompanied by a communication from a lady who 
wished no public mention to be made of her name, stating that she 
obligated herself "to donate annually, for an indefinite period of years, 
a sum of money to be used as a benefit to one or more deserving, 
industrious lady students pursuing studies in the Collegiate depart- 
ment of Augustana College, the beneficiaries to be chosen by a com 
mittee of the College faculty. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 129 

It was further stated that "this fund shall be known as the 'Anna 
Westman Stipend,' being given as an appreciative memorial to Miss 
Westman, who was the friend and helper of young women struggling, 
like herself, to obtain a college education," and further, that "this 
fund shall be announced annually on January 7th, the date of Miss 
Westman's birth, or as soon thereafter as is possible." 

Miss Anna Westman was graduated from Augustana College in 1892, 
and was instructor in Mathematics at the institution for two years. 
She died in Cleveland, Ohio, August 1, 1910. 

THE CLASS OP '85 SCHOLARSHIP 
A scholarship was established in the spring of 1911 by the alumni 
of the class of 1885, subject to the following regulations: 

Art. I. Name: — This scholarship shall be known as the Class of '85 
Scholarship. 

Art. II. Purpose: — This scholarship is an expression of love and 
gratitude to the Alma Mater from the members of the class of '85, and 
its purpose is to encourage and aid the cause of higher education at 
Augustana. 

Art. III. Value: This scholarship shall have a face value of not 
less than $1,000.00, and shall yield an annual income of not less than 
$50.00, to be available in two installments, one at the end of each of 
the two terms of the school-year. 

Art. IV. Provisions: — This scholarship shall be conferred by the 
College faculty upon: 
Sec. 1. A member of the Freshmen class of Augustana College, 
Sec. 2. Whose deportment and diligence is approved by the faculty, 
Sec. 3. Whose average standing in all required subjects of any 
course of the Freshman year shall be the highest. 

Sec. 4. The faculty may for any cause withhold the scholarship, or 
confer it upon a student who does not fulfill the requirements of Sec- 
tions 1—3 of this article. 

THE DR. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 
A sum of thirteen hundred dollars ($1,300) has been collected by Dr. 
N. Forsander from among his personal friends for the purpose of 
establishing a scholarship at Augustana College and Theological Sem- 
inary, named by the Board of Directors the Dr. N. Forsander Scholar- 
ship. The annual income of this scholarship shall be given to some 
student of this Theological Seminary, who is well known as an earnest 
Christian, who is faithful and diligent in his studies, and who has gifts 
fitting him for the holy ministry, preference being given to one who 
intends to devote himself to the work of foreign missions. The bene- 
ficiary of this fund shall be appointed by the Theological faculty. 



130 GEXEBAL IXFOBMATIOX 

THE SEMINARY DORMITORY FUND 
The sum of $1,000 was on Sept. 11, 1912 donated to the Institution 
by Dr. N. Forsander, which amount together with the interest is to be 
used for a dormitory for students of The Theological Seminary. With 
the interest this fund now amounts to $1,109.98. 

LOCATION AND BUILDINGS 

Rock Island, a city of about twenty-five thousand inhabitants, is 
beautifully located on the banks of the Mississippi River. The bold 
bluffs on the Illinois side of the river here recede to a distance of 
about a mile, leaving a beautiful and gently rising plain, upon which 
the city is built. In beauty of scenery, healthfulness of location and 
climate, Rock Island stands foremost among Illinois towns. Three 
great lines of railroads, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific, the Chi- 
cago, Burlington and Quincy, and the Chicago Milwaukee and St. Paul, 
center here, rendering the city easy of access from all parts of the 
country. The institution is situated in the eastern part of the city 
near the base of a prominent bluff, from which the view is both strik- 
ing and picturesque. Opposite lies the city of Davenport, Iowa, com- 
mandingly located on the bluffs which rise almost directly from the 
river. To the east the eye rests on the tall chimneys of the busy city 
of Moline, rendered famous by her manufacturers. Directly in front 
of the College grounds, in the middle of the river, is the government 
island of Rock Island, containing over nine hundred acres of land upon 
which the government's largest arsenal is built. On the lower end of 
the island rests the iron railroad and wagon bridge which spans the 
river at this point, thus rendering Davenport easily accessible. 

The grounds of the institution consist of about thirty-six acres of 
land. One of the street car lines, extending from the business parts 
on Seventh avenue and Thirty-eighth street. 

The following buildings, belonging to the institution, are located on 
the grounds: 

The New College Building, occupied since February, 1888, is located 
near the center of the grounds, fronting Seventh avenue. It is a stone 
structure of the pure Renaissance style. The basement and the first 
floor are devoted to the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Col- 
legiate and Academic Departments, and faculty rooms. The second 
floor contains the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Theological 
Department, Cable Hall, and the Chapel, which occupies two stories in 
the east end of the building. The third floor is given to the Art De- 
partment, Biological laboratory and recitation rooms. 

The Denkmann Memorial Library, the corner stone of which was 
laid Jan. 21, 1910, and which was dedicated May 31, 1911, is the gift 
to the institution of the sons and daughters of the late Mr. and Mrs. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 131 

Fredrick C. A. Denkmann of Rock Island. The names of these generous 
donors are: Mrs. Marie Antoniette Reimers, Mrs. Apollonia Adelaide 
Davis, Mrs. Elise Augusta Marshall, Mrs. Catherine Wentworth, Mrs. 
Susanne C. Hauberg, Mr. Edward P. Denkmann and Mr. Frederick 
C. Denkmann. The building, located in the northwestern part of the 
campus, is a magnificent structure of marble-like stone, with the most 
sumptuous interior appointments. The ground floor contains a lecture 
room, a memorial hall, administration offices, etc. The second floor 
contains the great main reading room, extending across the whole 
front, 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. On the third floor is a large room 
set apart for the Museum. The rear of the building contains stack- 
rooms for 100,000 volumes, librarian's office, seminar rooms, waiting 
rooms, etc. 

The Old College Building, occupied since 1875, is a large brick struc- 
ture situated on Seventh avenue, east of the New building. It is de- 
voted principally to students' rooms, the household department, and 
class-rooms of the Commercial department. 

The Gymnasium, a brick structure with stone foundation, has been 
erected at a cost of $6,000. It is located at the foot of the hill south 
of the College building. 

The Ladies' Hall, a large brick structure, is located near the eastern 
side of the grounds. On the ground floor suitable rooms are used 
by the School of Music as practice rooms. 

Ericson Hall, a brick building, is located in Ericson Park. It is at 
present used for the Chemical and Physical laboratories. 

Besides the above there are two frame buildings located on Thirty- 
fifth street and used as residences. 

THE CHARTER. 
Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, rep- 
resented in the General Assembly, That Erland Carlsson, T. N. Hasssl- 
quist, Carl Johan P. Peterson, Ole Anderson, Iver Lawson, John Amond- 
son, Carl Stromberg, John Field, and their successors in office, to be 
elected as hereinafter provided, be and are hereby constituted a body 
corporate and politic, under the name and style of the Augustana Col- 
lege and Theological Seminary, and by that name and style shall have 
perpetual succession with power to sue and be sued, implead and be 
impleaded, and shall be capable in law of taking and holding by gift 
or grant, devise, or otherwise, and of purchasing and holding, and con- 
veying, both in law and equity, any estate or interest therein, real, 
personal or mixed, and shall have power to execute and fulfill all such 
trusts as may be confided in said corporation, and take, hold, use, 
manage, lease, and dispose of all such trust property that may in any 
manner come to said corporation, charged with any trust or trusts in 



132 GENERAL INFORMATION 

conformity therewith; to have and to use a common seal, and to alter 
same at pleasure. 

Sec. 2. Said corporation shall have power to establish and maintain 
in or near the town of Paxton, Ford Co., Illinois, or any other suitable 
place within the State of Illinois, a college and theological seminary 
under the patronage and control of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lu- 
theran Augustana Synod in North America. And the persons herein 
before mentioned as incorporators shall constitute the first board of 
trustees, or directors. Their successors shall also be chosen, and the 
institution be governed by the said Augustana Synod, as provided for 
by the Constitution of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augus- 
tana Seminary already enacted by said Synod; which Constitution the 
Synod shall have power to amend or alter as the needs and develop- 
ment of the institution may require; Provided always, that such amend- 
ments or alterations, or by-laws, which the Synod may enact, shall be 
made in conformity with the Constitution of said Synod, and not in- 
consistent with the Constitution and laws of the State of Illinois. 

Sec. 3. It is also provided that the trustees or directors shall re- 
spectively hold their office until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. 

Sec. 4. In case of vacancy in the board of trustees or directors, by 
death or otherwise, between the meetings of the Synod, the said board 
may, by ballot, fill such vacancy, by the election of a person or persons 
of the Lutheran Church, and such a person or persons so elected, shall 
hold their office until the next meeting of the Augustana Synod, when 
such vacancy shall be filled by the Synod. 

Sec. 5. In case any of the trustees or directors should, at any time, 
cease to be members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, they shall 
thenceforth cease to be trustees, and their place may be filled in the 
manner specified in section four. 

Sec. 6. The board of trustees or directors shall have power also to 
confer the usual degree of Doctor of Divinity, Master of Arts, Bachelor 
of Arts, or any other Literary or Scientific degrees, on such person or 
persons as they may deem entitled thereto, on the recommendation of 
the faculty. 

Sec. 7. The doctrines taught in the Seminary department of said 
institution shall conform to and be in harmony with the doctrines held 
and maintained by the Augustana Synod as defined in article two of 
the Constitution of said Synod, in the following words, to wit, "As a 
Christian body in general, particularly as an Evangelical Lutheran, this 
Synod acknowledges that the Holy Scriptures, the revealed word of 
God, are the only sufficient and infallible rule and standard of faith 
and practice, and also retains and confessess not only the three oldest 
symbols (the Apostolic, the Nicene, and the Athanasian), but also the 



GENERAL INFORMATION 133 

unaltered Augsburg Confession, as a short and correct summary of the 
principal Christian doctrines as understood and explained in the other 
symbolical books of the Lutheran Church." Any deviation by the pro- 
fessors and teachers from the doctrinal standard shall be deemed suf- 
ficient cause to be dealt with as described in Art. 6 of the Constitution 
of the Seminary, adopted at the Synodical meeting in Clinton, Wis- 
consin, June 5th to 11th, A. D. 1860. 

Sec. 8. The property of said corporation, both real and personal, not 
exceeding the value of One Hundred Thousand Dollars, shall forever 
remain free from taxation. 

Sec. 9. This act to take effect and be in force from and after its 
passage, and to be deemed a public act. Approved Feb. 16th, 1865, and 
amended March 10th, 1869. 

Vide Private Laws of the State of Illinois, Vol. 1 (1865), page 21, 
also Vol. 1 (1869), page 37. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

Nearly three hundred years ago Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden con- 
ceived the idea of establishing a Swedish colony in the New World. 
His heroic death at Liitzen in 1632 seemed to put an end to his plans, 
but his daughter Queen Christina with the advice of the great states- 
man Oxenstjerna sought to realize the hopes of the dead king. In 
1637 Swedish colonists, "the Pilgrim Fathers of the North", sailed from 
Gothenburg to America in two ships (Kalmar Nyckel and Fogel Grip), 
which arrived at the Delaware River in the middle of March 1638. 
Fort Christina was founded and, during the years immediately follow- 
ing, settlements were made at Philadelphia, Wilmington and other 
neighboring places. From the first, Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
churches were founded, the first clergyman being R. Torkillus from 
Skara and Gothenburg. The colonists dealt with the Indians in a 
friendly and fair spirit and won their confidence. The first missionary 
among the Indians in America was Johannes Campanius during the 
years 1643 — 1648, who began his work even before John Eliot of Massa- 
chusetts went forth as missionary among the aborigines. Campanius 
learned the language of the Indians and translated Luther's catechism, 
with explanations, into their tongue, a copy of which translation is 
found in the library of Augustana College anl Theological Seminary. 

The descendants of these Swedish colonists took part in the Revo- 
lutionary war and in the forming of the government of the United 
States. One of these, John Morton, cast the decisive vote by which 
Pennsylvania in the Continental Congress joined the other colonies in 
the declaration of Independence and was one of the signers of that act. 
Another descendant of these pilgrim Swedes was John Hanson, the 
first president of Congress under the Constitution of 1789. The chil- 



134 GENERAL INFORMATION 

dren of these colonies have taken active part in the upbuilding of their 
states. The virtual founder of Pennsylvania University was Charles 
Stille\ a colonial Swede, and some of the chancellors have claimed Swe- 
dish colonial descent. 

The great tide of emigration from Northern continental Europe did 
not begin, however, till the years between 1840 and 1850. The pioneers 
who then came made their way mainly to the northern Mississippi 
valley, founding their homes in the large unsettled tracts of northern 
Illinois and Iowa, later in Wisconsin, Minnesota and other states. 
These immigrants had been members of the Lutheran Church in the 
mother country, and were as a rule a religious and churchly people, 
wishing to retain their religious heritage on the new soil. Earnest, 
pious men came over as pastors, and Lutheran congregations were 
early established among the Swedes and Norwegians. At the organi- 
zation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Northern Illinois in 1851, 
several Scandinavian pastors were present and took part in the organi- 
zation. The scattered Scandinavian and American Lutherans in this 
section of the country were thus joined in one Synod. The Scandi- 
navians increased rapidly and before 1860 they constituted about one- 
half of the Synod, and formed three separate conferences. Ths Synod 
and other Lutheran bodies in the West established a school, known 
as the Illinois State University, at Springfield, 111., for the special 
purpose of educating Lutheran ministers. At a meeting of the Synod 
in 1855, the question of establishing a Scandinavian professorship at 
the University was favorably considered, and at a subsequent meeting 
a resolution to establish such a professorship was adopted, and Rev. 
L. P. Esbjorn, the first of the pioneer pastors, was elected to the chair. 
He entered upon his duties in the fall of 1858, and served two years, 
having among his pupils (in the subject of mathematics) the son af 
Abraham Lincoln, who sometimes consulted with Esbjorn concerning 
his son's studies. Prof. Esbjorn resigned this professorship in the 
spring of 1860. Differences with regard to the doctrinal basis of the 
Synod existed from the beginning between the Scandinavians and 
American members. Professor Esbjorn's resignation brought matters 
to a crisis. The Scandinavians met in convention in Chicago, 111., 
April 23 — 27, 1860, and after long deliberation unanimously resolved 
on April 27 (which date is therefore celebrated at Augustana as Found- 
ers' day) to organize a synod for themselves, and to establish a theo- 
logical Seminary of their own. The organization of the Synod, which 
was to be known as the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augustana 
Synod, was completed at a subsequent convention held at Jefferson 
Prairie, near Clinton, Wis., June 5 — 11 the same year. It is to these 
meetings that Augustana College and Theological Seminary traces its 
origin. It was for three years located at Chicago, the instruction 






GENERAL INFORMATION 135 

mainly being given in the old church then located on Superior st., be- 
tween Wells and La Salle sts. 

These were years of hardship for the young institution. The call of 
Abraham Lincoln for volunteers in the Civil war was heeded by some 
of the students and by many who otherwise would have become stu- 
dents of Augustana, two of the sons of president Esbjorn enlisting in 
the army. In 1863, when Prof. Esbjorn resigned, the institution was 
moved to Paxton, 111., where Prof. T. N. Hasselquist became its head, 
which position he retained till his death in 1891. The institution was 
incorporated under the laws of Illinois in 1863 and named Augustana 
College and Seminary and afterward by a special act of the legislature 
in 1865, a charter was granted which was amended by a supplementary 
act by the same body in 1869, since which time the institution has been 
known by its present name. 

Instruction was given both in Seminary and College subjects from 
the very beginning, and college classes were formed as early as 1866. 
Every year from 1861 students were sent forth from the theological 
Seminary to enter the work of the ministry of the Augustana Synod, 
being able to supply only in part the ever growing needs of the Church. 
The first graduating class from the College department received the 
degree of A. B. in 1877, since which time this has been an ever growing 
department of the institution. 

In 1887 the Conservatory of Music was added, and the following year 
a Business Department was organized. The Normal Department was 
established in 1891. In connection with the Conservatory of Music a 
School of Art was established by the Board of Directors in 1895. 

The original plan of the Seminary was to have at least three pro- 
fessors, one for each of the leading languages used — Swedish, Nor- 
wegian, and English. This plan was not fully realized until 1868, when 
Rev. S. L. Harkey was elected to the chair of the English language and 
Rev. A. Wenaas to that of the Norwegian. The whole plan, however, 
was completely changed in 1870, when the Norwegians withdrew and 
organized a separate synod and established an institution of their own. 

The courses of instruction in the Theological Seminary were gradu- 
ally made to embrace two years, and from 1874 there were two regular 
classes in the Seminary until 1890, when the university plan was 
adopted, and the instruction was arranged in distinct and independent 
courses. This plan was approved by the Synod in 1891. The number of 
courses was first fourteen, but has since increased to twenty. Ten 
departments of instruction have gradually been established in the 
College proper, viz.: Swedish, English and Philosophy, Latin, Greek, 
Modern Languages, Christianity, History and Political Science, Biology 
and Geology, Physics and Chemistry, and Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Swedish and English were provided for in the original plan. Around 



136 GENERAL INFORMATION 

the Swedish chair clustered Christianity, German, and the Classics; 
and around the English chair, History, Philosophy, Mathematics, and 
the Sciences. As a rule these subjects were taught in the language 
around which they were grouped. Latin and Swedish were for many 
years taught by the same professor, but in 1883 Latin was made a 
separate chair, and Swedish and Christianity were united into one 
chair and taught by two professors, one in the College proper and one 
in the Preparatory Department. In 1890 both these professors re- 
signed, and the two subjects were separated into distinct departments. 
Greek and German were likewise united in one chair for a number of 
years, but in 1887 the chair of Modern Languages was established and 
German was assigned to it. Greek thus became a separate chair. 
Mathematics and Natural Science were separated in 1881. The latter 
was further separated into the chair of Biology and Geology and that 
of Physics and Chemistry in 1888. The chair of History and Political 
Science was established in 1884. During the last decade all subjects 
in the College and Academy are taught in English, except the Swedish 
language and literature. Both of these departments belong to the 
North Central Association and as a first class American College fulfill 
the high requirements of this Association. In the Theological Sem- 
inary the instruction is given by means of both English and Swedish, 
as the pastor in our Synod needs to master both these languages. 

The institution as a whole has always been open to students of good 
moral character, without regard to language, race, nationality, or creed. 
Lady students were allowed to attend instruction in the various classes, 
but were not matriculated until 1886. Of the students in the Theo- 
logical Seminary, 797 have been ordained to the holy ministry. In 
the Collegiate Department 563 have graduated with the degree of A. B., 
and 40 with the degree of B. S. The Commercial Department numbers 
985 graduates, the Conservatory of Music 129, and the Normal School 
37. The graduates of the present year are not included in any of the 
above figures. 

The first president of the institution was Prof. L. P. Esbjorn, who 
served during the first three years. When the institution was removed 
to Paxton, in 1863, Dr. T. N. Hasselquist, who had just accepted a call 
to the new congregation at that place, was appointed to take charge 
of the school until a permanent professor and president could be se- 
cured. The position, however, became permanent, and he served as 
president until his death in 1891. 

Dr. O. Olsson was elected to succeed him. His death occurred on 
May 12, 1900. 

Dr. C. W. Foss served as Acting President until the summer of 1901, 
when Dr. Gustav Andreen, of Yale University, was elected to the 
presidency. 






BOLL OF STUDENTS 



137 



Graduates, Decrees and 
Diplomas, 1915 



BACHELOR OF 

Carl Gustav Anderson 
Oscar Algot Benson 
Carl Otto Bergquist 
Sigfrid Luther Blomgren 
Gustav Hjalmar Bomgren 
Peter Gustaf Carlstedt 
Luther Immanuel Cornay 
Walfred Erhart Erickson 
Olof Bernhard Hanson 
Axel Richard Hedstrom 
Linus Aron Herman 
Arthur William Johnson 
Albin Andrew Larson 
Carl Anders Vilhelm Lund 
Lawrence Fredrick Nordstrom 
Martin Amos Odell 
Verner Gustaf Ogren 
Oscar Edwin Olmon 
Carl Bernhard Sandberg 
Samuel Rudolph Swenson 



DIVINITY 

Winburne, Pa. 
Greensburg, Pa. 
Dassel, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Bostorp, Sweden 
Marinette, Wis. 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Pelican Rapids, Minn. 
Malmo, Nebr. 
Ogden, Iowa 
Rockford 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Bridgeport, Conn. 
Boston, Mass. 
Kansas City, Kans. 
Stillwater, Minn. 
Denver, Colo. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Halsingborg, Sweden 



GRADUATES WITH THE S. M. DEGREE 



Johan Alfred Burman 
Arvid Ferdinand Hoorn 
Robert Otto Kaeiding 
Herman Albin Larson 
Albert Loreen 
Joseph Conrad Mattson 

C. S. T. DEGREE 

Rev. 0. M. Norlie 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Andreas Daniel Freden 
Theodore Albert Jansen 
Ernst Gotthard Svenson 

Leonard Heiner 

Karl A. von Lehnsburg 

Otto Westling 



HOSPITANTS 



Providence, R. I. 
Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Hvena, Sweden 
Ashtabula, Ohio 
Winthrop, Minn. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Atwater, Minn. 

Stockholm, Sweden 
Astoria, Ore. 
Chicago 

Chicago 
Rock Island 
Troy, Idaho 



138 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



DOCTOB OF LAWS 

The Right Reverend Bishop 
K. H. Gez. von Scheele 



Stockholm, Sweden 



MASTER OF ARTS 



David A. Leonard 
William Robb 



Warroad, Minn. 
Rock Island 



BACHELOR OF ARTS 



Amy Joanna Anderson 

Evan Ernest Anderson 

Conrad John Immanuel Bergendoff 

Anton Emanuel Bomgren 

Carl Oscar Carlson 

Esther Marie Carlson 

Edith Anna Cling 

Emil Dalberg 

Leo Ray DeLong 

Esther Maria Eckstrom 

Carl Edwin Gunderson 

Frank William Hanson 

Povl Holmstrup 

Paul Olof Hult 

Reuben Hartvic Hultgren 

Broer Rollo Johnson 

Clarence Oliver Johnson 

John Reinhold Johnson 

Magnus Arthur Johnson 

Lawrence Edwin Jones 

Karl Gottfrid Larson 

Signe Alfrida Larson 

Eleanor Magnuson 

Emma Carolyn Nelson 

John Fredrik Nelson 

Olof Richard Noreen 

Sven Gustav Ohman 

Margaret Olmsted 

Martin Oscar Olson 

Adina Olsson 

Ernest Arvid Palm 

Victor R. Pearson 

Johan Thorsten Sellin 

George Martin Thimell 

Ester Theodore Youngberg 



Escanaba, Mich. 

Marinette, Wis. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Washington Depot, Ct. 

Woodhull 

Chicago 

Mediapolis, Iowa 

Galesburg 

Rock Island 

Worcester, Mass. 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Burtrum, Minn. 

San Francisco, Cal. 

Rock Island 

Andover 

Cadillac, Mich. 

Geneva 

Ridgway, Pa. 

Gary, Ind. 

Warren, Pa. 

Rockford 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ft. Dodge, Iowa 

Batavia 

Hogsater, Sweden 

New Britain, Conn. 

Rock Island 

Letesmala, Sweden 

Norway, Mich. 

Ludington, Mich. 

Wahoo, Nebr. 

Ft. William, Ont., Can. 

Rockford 

Munson, Pa. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



139 



GRADUATES OF THE CONSERVATORY 



PIANO 



Mynne Wilhelmina Carlson 
Velma Fern Delano 
Hazel Antoinette Johnson 
Etta Dorothy Kruse 
Wava Catholine Lindstrom 
Florence Estella Swenson 
Sophie Adele Thurstone 



Helen Isabel Parker 
Sophie Adele Thurstone 

Amy Irene Anderson 
Esther Irene Blomquist 
Ruth Alwilda Greene 
Wilhelmina Heick 
Hilma Miriam Truedson 



ORGAN 



VOICE 



Hartington, Nebr. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Baraga, Mich. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Sherrard 
Dayton, Iowa 
Rochester, N. Y. 



Rock Island 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Rock Island 
Amasa, Mich. 
Moline 
Kewanee 
Hoquiam, Wash. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 



Esther Lillian Aronson 
Esther Irene Blomquist 
Alma Dorothy Eliason 
Hazel Eulalie Flick 
Wilhelmina Heick 
Eva Elise Thelin 
Grace Elizabeth Ullemeyer 

EXPRESSION 

Cecilia Agnes Kraft 
Eleanor Marie Magnuson 
Ruth Esther McLaughlin 
Edith "Victoria Peterson 



Iron River, Mich. 
Amasa, Mich. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Kewanee 
Clinton, Iowa 
Rock Island 



Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 



GRADUATES OF THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTS 

Lawrence Vernie Anderson Rock Island 

Clarence Lawrence Bennett North Henderson 

Elmer Clarence Johnson Woodhull 

GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT 

Arthur Alfred Anderson Metropolitan, Mich. 

Sophus Emil Behrman Bancroft, Iowa 



140 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Nels Conrad Benson 
Clyde Raymond Buffum 
Robert Leonard Danielson 
Rudolph Erickson 
John Henry Johnson 
Gunnar William Nelson 
Merle Simeon Robison 
Ruth Elizabeth Robison 



Florence, Wis. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Negaunee, Mich. 
Greenville, Conn. 
Winegar, Wis. 
Edgington 
Edgington 



CERTIFICATE 

In Bookkeeping 
John William Anderson 
George Leonard Attig 
Reefe Charles Crakes 
Floyd Raymond Dahlberg 
Maurice Deletter 
Erick Reinhold Gustafson 
Raymond Paul Nicholson 

In Shorthand 
Arthur Alfred Anderson 
Harriet Bancroft 
Grace Blankenfeld 
John Ivar Blomquist 
John Alfred Branfors 
Florence Esther Brashar 
Marguerite Chapman 
Maurice Deletter 
Henry McKinley Dixon 
Elin Albertina Eng 
Fay Gamble 

Erick Reinhold Gustafson 
Wilhelmina Elizabeth Harris 

Emmy Evelyn Hemborg 

Hildur Augusta Herrstrom 

Jessie Johnson 

Gladys Katz 

Luella Minnie Kelly 

Edith Kjellberg 

Elsie Lange 

Andorra Larrison 

Max Millian Larson 

Wilbert Larson 

Edna Elvira Lofgren 



Madrid, Iowa 
Reynolds 
Kendall, Mich. 
Cambridge 
Rock Island 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Crisman, Ind 



Metropolitan, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Metropolitan, Mich. 
Manistique, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Cambridge 
Rock Island 
Wakefield, Nebr. 
Jennings, Mich. 
Moline 

Escanaba, Mich. 
American Consulate, 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Stromsburg, Nebr. 
Moline 
Cambridge 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Thompson, Mich. 
Moline 
Moline 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



141 



Anna Margaret Patton 
Mary Clara Santry 
Irene Mosher Saulpaugh 
Cecilia Schug 
Naomi Setterdahl 
Naemi Swanson 
Alice Elizabeth Thelin 
Kennith Melford Westering 
Nora Wingmuth 
Betty Zeffren 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Milan 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Moline 

Hastings, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 



142 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Roll of Students, 1916. 



THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



POSTGRADUATES 
Candidates for the degree Sacrce Theologiw Doctor 
Rev. Olaf Morgan Norlie, Ph. D., Pd. D., C. S. T. Atwater, Minn. 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. J. H. Ford, C. S. T. Centerville, S. D. 

Candidates for the degree Candidatus Sacrw Theologian, C. 8. T. 
Rev. Emil Gottfrid Chinlund, A. B., B. D. Omaha, Nebr. 

Has completed courses 13, 21, 24, 17, 5, Major 2. 
Rev. H. D. Hoover, Ph. D., Pres. Carthage College Carthage, 111. 



Rev. Adolf A. Wilfrid, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. V. E. Holmstedt, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. H. E. Sandstedt, A. B., B. D. 

Has completed courses 1, Minor; 5, Major 2 
Rev. Anton Linder, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. E. P. Karleen, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. N. A. Nelson, A. B., B. D. 

Has completed courses 5, Major 1: 10, 
Rev. E. W. Magnusson, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. Prof. S. J. Sebelius, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. Jno. E. Oslund, A. B., B. D. 

Has completed course 2, Minor 1. 
Rev. Axel C. Anderson, A. B., B. D. 

Has completed course 4, Major 1. 
Rev. Waldo C. Ekeberg, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. A. M. Knudsen, A. B., B. D. 
Rev. Gustave Carlson, A. B., B. D. 



Mount Jewett, Pa. 
Manhattan, Kans. 
Portland, Ore. 
Minor 1. 

Bradford, Pa. 
Red Oak, Iowa 
Osceola, Nebr. 
Minor 3. 

Geneseo 
Rock Island 
Stillwater, Minn. 

North Easton, Mass. 

Peoria 

Boulder, Colo. 
Gardner, Mass. 



Candidates for the degree Divinitatis Baccalatirei 
Rev. Haldor Thorsen, A. B. Calgary, Alta, Can. 

Rev. B. A. Olsen, A. B. Seneca 



SENIOR CLASS 

Gustav Knut Andeen 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
Ture Valdemar Anderson 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1913 
Carl Emil Bergquist 



Attleboro, Mass. 



Kenora, Ont, Can. 



New Britain, Conn. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



143 



A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
John Billdt 

A. B., Bethany College, 1913 
Efraim Ceder 

A. B., Upsala College, 1909 
Otto Theodore Eklund 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
Paul David Engstrand 

A. B., Bethany College, 1912 
William Albert Ericson 

A. B., Bethany College, 1913 
William Robert Frendberg 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
Oscar Otto Gustafson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1913 
Sigurd Linne Hanson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1913 
Hugo Benjamin Haterius 

A. B., Bethany College, 1912 
Aron Theo. Johnson Hjerpe 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
Joseph Walton Kempe 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Arthur William Knock 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1912 
Anton Mander Lundeen 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1913 
Carl Samuel Odell 

A. B., Bethany College, 1913 
Carl Hjalmar Olson 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1913 
Hjalmar Rudolf Peterson 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1912 
David Verner Swanson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1913 
Martin Luther Lawrence Swanson 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
George Martin Thimell 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Walter August Tilberg 

A. B., Bethany College, 1912 

MIDDLE CLASS 

Svante Anderson Erling 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Frank Gustav Granquist 



Wahoo, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Leonardville, Kans. 
Lindsborg, Kans. 
Grassflat, Pa. 
Funk, Nebr. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Olivia, Texas 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Red Oak, Iowa 
St. Peter, Minn. 
Newman Grove, Nebr. 
Kansas City, Kans. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
St. Peter, Minn. 
Axtell, Nebr. 
North Easton, Mass. 
Rockford 
Dwight, Kans. 

Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Rock Island 



144 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Henry George Hanson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Gustaf Wilhelm Henry 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Carl Arthur Johnson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Henning Leonard Johnson 

A. B., Upsala College, 1914 
Johan Alfred Lundgren 

A. B„ Upsala College, 1909 
Elmer Lawrence Olsen 

A. B., Knox College, 1914 
Arthur Eugene Olson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Victor Rosenius Pearson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Arthur Lawrence Peterson 

A. B., Bethany College, 1913 
Herbert Carl Morton Swanson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1913 
Bert Martin Samuelson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1910 
Lawrence Joseph Sodergren 

A. B., Bethany College, 1913 
Levin Julius Trued 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 



Burtrum, Minn. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Weston, Nebr. 
Lanse, Pa. 
Kane, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Bertrand, Nebr. 
Hepburn, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Ceresco, Nebr. 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Leonard Alexander 

A. B., Upsala College, 1915 
Gustavus Herbert Anderson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Hilding Cornelius Anderson 

B. S., University of Minnesota, 1915 
Paul Harold Andreen 

A. B., Augustana College, 1911 
Carl August Bengtson 

A. B., Bethany College, 1915 
Anton Emanuel Bomgren 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Carl Oscar Bostrom 

A. B., Upsala College, 1915 
Charles William Erickson 



Kenosha, Wis. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Mount Vernon, Wash. 
Rock Island 
Longmont, Colo. 
Washington, Conn. 
Portland, Conn. 
Saint Hilaire, Minn. 






ROLL OF STUDENTS 



146 



A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Frank William Hanson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Eric Julius Heurlin 

A. B., Bethany College, 1904 
Ernest Hjalmar Jackson 

A. B., Bethany College, 1915 
Albert John Johnson 

Upsala College, 1915 
Magnus Arthur Johnson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Lawrence Edwin Jones 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Julius Albin Larson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Albin Lindgren 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Arnold Gottfrid Nelson 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Carl David Waldemar Nelson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Johan Fredrik Nelson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Theodore Bengt Nordale 

A. B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Martin Oscar Olson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1915 
Halvar George Randolph 

A. B., Upsala College, 1913 
Ernst Julius Sakrison 

A. B . Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 



Burtrum, Minn. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Malmo, Nebr. 
Orion 
Gary, Ind. 
Warren, Pa. 
Canton 

Lindstrom, Minn. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Marathon, Iowa 
Batavia 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chicago 

Springfield, Mass. 
St. Peter, Minn. 



Gustaf Gottfrid Carlson 
Johan Pehrson Warner 
Abraham Wattman 



HOSPITANTS 

SENIOR YEAR 



Spokane, Wash. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Roseau, Minn. 



Ragnar Per Emil Byrenius 



MIDDLE YEAR 



oland, Sweden 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Adolf Theodor Bergquist 

Senior Class, Augustana College 
Arthur Oscar Hjelm 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Springfield, Mass. 



146 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Senior Class, Upsala College 
Fred Gustav Olson 



Gladstone, Mich. 



SPECIAL STUDENT 

Elmer Samuel Nicholson Crisman, Ind. 

NON-RESIDENT HOSPITANT STUDENT 

Erick August Bongfeldt Hopkins, Minn. 



THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 



Class of '00 Rockford 



Class of '00 Kansas City, Mo. 



Class of '03 Frederic, Wis. 



Class of '07 Austin, Texas. 



POSTGRADUATES 
Candidates for the degree Master of Arts 
Marion Albert Andreen Class of '13 Collinsville 

major subject — Physics. 

minor subject — Chemistry. 
Rev. John Alfred Benander 

major subject — English. 

minor subject — Swedish. 
Rev. Charles E. Bengtson 

major subject — Sociology. 

minor subject — Ancient History. 
Rev. Per Ernst Bergstrom 

major subject — German. 

minor subject? — Swedish. 
Isidore John Broman 

major subject — Geology. 

minor subject: — Sociology. 
Carl William Carlson, Bethany College, Class of '10 Gardner, Mass. 

major subject — Psychology. 

MINOR SUBJECT — EthiCS. 

Efraim Ceder Upsala College, Class of '10 Rock Island 

major subject — History of Swedish Literature. 

minor subject — History and Political Science. 
Rev. Edward Ekstrom Class of '10 Moline 

major subject — Swedish Literature. 

minor subject — Swedish Language. 
Rev. George Fahlund Class of '04 De Kalb 

major subject — Ancient History. 

minor subject — English. 
Rev. Thure Abraham Holmer Class of '09 Rajahmundry, India 

major subject: — English. 

minor subject — History. 






BOLL OF STUDENTS 



147 



Rev. Frans Erik Wilhelm Kastman 

major subject 1 — Swedish. 

minob subject — English. 
Joseph Walton Kempe 

majob subject — History. 

minob subject^ — Political Science 
Rev. Johan August Landin 

MAJOB SUBJECT — Sociology. 

minob subject 1 — History. 
Karl Gottfrid Larson 

majob subject — Physics. 

minob subject — Chemistry. 
Gotthard Lindholm G. A. College, Class of 

majob subject 1 — Physics. 

minob subject — Geology. 
Anna Marie Lindquist Class of 

majob subject — Psychology. 

minob subject — History. 
Carl Edward Nelson G. A. College, Class of 

majob subject — Swedish. 

minob subject — English. 
Lawrence Fredrick Nordstrom, Upsala, Class of 

majob subject — Sociology. 

minob subject — Physiology. 
Rev. Ernst Edwin Ryden Class of 

major subject — English. 

minor subject — History. 
Julius Adam Reinemund Class of 

majob subject — English Literature. 

minob subject: — Philosophy. 
Oliver Leonard Troxel, Northw. College, Class of 

majob subject — Philosophy of Education. 

minob subject? — Mathematics. 



Class of '07 Seattle, Wash. 



Class of '14 Rock Island 



Class of '08 Chicago 



Class of '15 Rock Island 



■13 



'11 



Litchfield, Minn. 
Chicago 



'03 Rock Island 



'12 Rock Island 



'10 Jamestown, N. Y. 



'11 Muscatine, Iowa 



14 Litchfield, Minn. 



resident graduates 
Hilding Cornelius Anderson Mt. Vernon, Wash. 

Carl Frederick Lindberg Omaha, Nebr. 



UNDERGRADUATES 



senior class 
Hildegarde Maria Anderson 
Martin Theodore Anderson 
Adolf Martin Benson 
Elmer Bernhard Benson 



Rock Island 
Madrid, Iowa 
Voxtorp, Sweden 
Rock Island 



148 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Adolf Theodore Bergquist 

Swanhild Anna Margareta Blomgren 

Karl Johan Broholm 

Charles Hillier Cords 

Greta Marie Curry 

Eleanor Dorothy Dahlen 

Gladys Mae Dunleavy 

Carl George Engdahl 

Knut Eric Erickson 

Virgilius Thure Anselm Ferm 

Hugo Emanuel Gibson 

Clarence Oscar Granlund 

Delia Ruth Harris 

Henning Adolph Hill 

Ethel Linnea Isaacson 

Carl Peter Constant Johnson 

Thorsten Ludvig Johnson 

Arthur Anders Levine 

Alvin Leonard Lugn 

John Wilbert Lundahl 

Alvin Daniel Mattson 

Geneva Craig McKeag 

Hazel Jeannette McKeag 

Gustav Edwin Nelson 

George Olson 

Oliver Leonard Olson 

Rudolph Ludvig John Olson 

Vera Jane Palm 

Johan Pearson 

Elmere Nathaniel Petersen 

Helen Louise Reinemund 

Theodore Luther Rydback 

Victoria Swanbeck 

Eva Caroline Swanson 

Edwin Johan Vikman 



Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rock Island 
Skagern, Sweden 
Coal Valley 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Titusville, Pa. 
Aurora 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Marquette, Mich. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Marquette, Mich. 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Manson, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Eau Claire, Wis. 
Hancock, Mich. 
Moline 

Malvern, Iowa 
Ludington, Mich. 
Lockport 

Big Rapids, Mich. 
Muscatine, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Swea City, Iowa 
Geneseo 
Rockford 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Carl Arthur Anderson 
Octavia Beckstrom 
Arthur Garfield Benson 
John Luther Benson 
Carl Leonard Carlson 
Anna Ingeborg Cesander 
Victor Alexander Elmblad 
Edmund Russel Fredrickson 



East Tawas, Mich. 
Laurens, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Portville, N. Y. 
Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Skanee, Mich. 
Essex, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



149 



Hjalmar Edward Fryxell 
Gustav Erik Gustavson 
Eskil Theodore Hawkins 
Gerda Marie Hiller 
Carl Titus Amandus Holmen 
Arthur Theodore Johnson 
Emil Julius Johnson 
William Gothard Larson 
Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 
Harold Raymor Lundgren 
John Anderson Martin 
Bessie Lavina Miller 
Mabel Florence Nelson 
Julius Vincent Nordgren 
Nils Pearson 

Elmer Theodore Peterson 
Karl Peter Silberg 
Arthur Valdemar Swedberg 

SOPHOMORE 

Esther Miriam Andreen 
Lois Bruner 
Ruth Amalia Carlson 
Blanche Mildred Carpenter 
Edna Eugenia Curry 
Harriet Calista Darling 
Irene Florence Dodson 
Vernon Alexis Ericson 
Adolph Emil Theodore Fant 
Inez Marguerite Gull 
Rudolf Gustaf Hanson 
Edgar Herman Johnson 
Florence Elizabeth Johnson 
George Franklin Johnson 
John Emil Leonard Johnson 
Lael Alberta Regina Johnson 
Lillian Henrietta Johnson 
Moneta Gunilla Johnson 
Carl Harry Kalquist 
Reuben Paul Kron 
Egner Johnny Larsen 
Anna Myrtle Otelia Larson 
Esther Hildegard Larson 
Joseph Emanuel Lind 
Helen Janet Miller 



CLASS 



Moline 
Evanston 
Cumberland, Wis. 
Rock Island 
Essex, Iowa 
Chesterton, Ind. 
Ludington, Mich. 
St. Joseph, Mich. 
Chicago 
Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Turlock, Cal. 
Rock Island 
Chicago 
Galva 

Providence, R. I. 
Chicago 

Ironwood, Mich. 
Rhinelander, Wis. 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Wakefield, Nebr. 
Pierson, Fla. 
Goodhue, Minn. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Wausa, Nebr. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Moline 

Round Rock, Texas 
Red Wing, Minn. 
La Porte, Ind. 
Moline 

Newport, R. I. 
Dayton, Iowa 
Mead, Nebr. 
Moline 

Smethport, Pa. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Somers, Wis. 



150 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Harland McNeil Mills 

Edmund David Nelson 

Petrus Herbert Nordlander 

Harry Edgar Olson 

Mae Christina Olson 

Paul Victor Randolph 

Jacob Rimmerman 

Eva Velta Robb 

Clarence Oliver Samuelson 

Truman Gorton Searle 

John Steimer 

Carl Axel Bernard Swanson 

Carl Irwin Swenson 

Donald McLean Vance 

Joseph Fridolph Youngstrom 

FRESHMAN CLASS 

Arthur William Almquist 

Albin Arthur Anderson 

Carl William Anderson 

David Edward Anderson 

Florence Anderson 

Gerald Joseph Clarence Anderson 

Joel Alfred Anderson 

Laura Annette Anderson 

Margaret Catherine Anderson 

Fletcher Biddle Ball 

Anders Emery Benander 

Hjalmar Henry Bergh 

Clarence Edward Blomberg 

Oscar Fredrick Bohman 

Hazel Anderson Brashear 

Noble Elmer Brewer 

James Donald Bruner 

Elizabeth Dietz Bryan 

Roger Martin Carlson 

Mildred Chapman 

Paul Andrew Dahlen 

Marie Theresa De Vere 

Laurence Joel Eckstrom 

Allen Townsend Eddy 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Robert William Erickson 

LaVerne John Evans 

Joseph Hjalmar Fagerstrom 



Davenport, Iowa 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Winfield, Iowa 
Reynolds 
Boone, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Mead, Nebr. 
Geneseo 
Sjobo, Sweden 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Dayton, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Dayton, Iowa 

Andover 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Stronghurst 
Chicago 

Wakefield, Nebr. 
Boxholm, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Boston, Mass. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Moline 

Abilene, Kans. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Harcourt, Iowa 
Bluffs 

Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Worcester, Mass. 
Milan 
Moline 

Winburne, Pa. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Jamestown, N. Y. 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



151 



Simon Emanuel Fagerstrom 
Esther Mabel Fant 
James Levi Fitzpatrick 
Louise Emelia Fivey 
Carl Joseph Forsberg 
Eben Verner Forsling 
Philip Sheaff Franzen 
Charles Weer Goff 
Fay Rebecca Hanna 
Frances Ann Hauck 
Charles Winfield Holmgren 
Earle Laurence Johnson 
Elmer Clarence Johnson 
John Herman Johnson 
Karl Edward Johnson 
Paul Oliver Johnson 
Leonard Albert Kendall 
August Einar Larson 
Hugo Christian Larson 
Carl Nathaniel Lindahl 
Theodore Lundblade 
George Albert Magnuson 
Marion Frances Maroney 
Earl Pehr Martinson 
Engelbert Salmond Metcalf 
Arion Emil Monell 
Anders Wilhelm Nelson 
George Irwin Nelson 
Arthur Benjamin Nicholson 
Neta Ogden 
Florence Elvira Olson 
Carl Ewald Palmer 
Reuben Nathaniel Palmer 
Wilbur Nathaniel Palmquist 
Roy Victor Peel 
John Raoul Redstrom 
Franklin Bliss Rinck 
Elna Celestine Samuelson 
Harold Sellin 
Elmer Emanuel Swanson 
Clarence Axel Toline 
Glenn Alex Trevor 
Martin Ferdinand Trued 



Jamestown, N. Y. 
Pierson, Fla. 
So. Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Moline 
Galva 
Woodhull 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Springfield 
Ottumwa, Iowa 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Ottumwa, Iowa 
Lancaster, Minn. 
Rock Island 
St. Charles 
Rock Island 
Calumet, Mich. 
Kearney, Nebr. 
Cherokee, Iowa 
Crisman, Ind. 
Maquoketa, Iowa 
Laurens, Iowa 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Chisago City, Minn. 
Lawton, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Chappell, Nebr. 
Afton, Iowa 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Moline 
Moline 
Ceresco, Nebr. 



152 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED 

Florence Beckstrom 

Eleanor Bengtson 

Ethel Bengtson 

Abby Denmore Blakemore 

Reeffe Charles Crakes 

Rudolph John Erickson 

Randolph Carter Farrar 

Joseph Theodore Faust 

Edythe Antonia Cordelia Frostrom 

Arthur Oscar Hjelm 

Elva Lorena Hoag 

Leon Walter Jelinek 

August Julius Johnson 

Edith Lenore Eileen Johnson 

Mamie Melinda Johnson 

Andorra Larrison 

Edward William Meek 

Richard Odelberg 

George Palm 

Frank E. Peterson 

Carl Pontus Peterson 



COLLEGE 

Laurens, Iowa 

Ludington, Mich. 

Oakland, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Kendall, Mich. 

Negaunee, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Bristow, Nebr. 

Springfield, Mass. 

Battle Creek, Mich. 

Crete, Nebr. 

Chicago 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Cambridge 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ludington, Mich. 

Moline 

Moline 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 



FOUBTH CLASS 

Nels Conrad Benson 
Edwin Mathew Blomquist 
Edward Julius Carlson 
Emil Johnson 
John Alfred Johnson 
Wallace Nathaniel Johnson 
Theodore Samuel Lenz 
John Elmer Nelson 
Herbert Theodore Olander 
Clifford Arnold Olson 
Arthur Herman Peterson 
Robert Frithiof Poison 
Leon Edward Robinson 
Erwin Richard Sailer 
Arthur Samuel Sprecher 
Allan Stebbens 
Eric Herbert Wahlstrom 
Harry Reinhold Wisen 



Florence, Wis. 
Metropolitan, Mich. 
Mt. Pleasant, Iowa 
Kila, Sweden 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Hawkeye, Iowa 
Moline 

Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Winfield, Iowa 
Nore Lena, Sweden 
Montello, Mass. 
Rock Island 
Tripp, S. D. 
Tripp, S. D. 
Rock Island 
Toreboda, Sweden 
Galesburg 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



153 



THIRD CLASS 

Minnie Emelia Anderson 
Gustav Fredrick Andree 
Ralph Gustave Bengston 
Mildred Hildegard lone Blomgren 
Arvid Johnson 
Esther Concordia Johnson 
Van Emanuel Johnson 
Victor Emanuel Johnson 
Elliott Monett Lundberg 
Peter Alfred Martinson 
Carl Gustaf Okerblom 
Otto Emanuel Olson 
Alfred Bernhard Peterson 
Erskin Wilson Robinson 
Lester Samuelson 
Alfred Leonard Sjostrom 
Mildred Squire 



Winburne, Pa. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Montrose, S. D. 
Chicago 

Hvellinge, Sweden 
Lynn Center 
Lodgepole, Nebr. 
Boxholm, Iowa 
So. Rock Island 
Orion 
Rockford 
Davenport, Iowa 



SECOND CLASS 

Evelyn Margaret Anderson 

Melvin Edward Fulton Anderson 

Grace Chadwick Barnett 

Carl Hjalmar Freeman 

Henning Leonard Hassel 

Lester Richard Horst 

Olof Bernhard Johnson 

Arthur Gustav Larson 

Gustav Fredrick Luther Lindstrom 

Eugene Theodore Lothgren 

Frans Axel Lyseen 

Anna Mauritzson 

Victor August Walter Mennicke 

Arthur Stowell Musson 

Carl Levi Nelson 

Nels Albert Nelson 

Paul Robert Nestler 

Arthur William Peterson 

Emil Alfred Swanson 

Thure Leonard Wisen 

George Wissing 



Rock Island 

Lynn Center 

Rock Island 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Atlanta, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Burea, Sweden 

Rockford 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Chicago 

Dala-Finnhyttan, Sweden 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Moline 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Spring Valley 

Marathon, Iowa 

Moline 

Galesburg 

Sioux City, Iowa 



FIRST CLASS 

Albert Leonard Anderson 
Carl Oscar Anderson 



Orion 

Sjostorp, Sweden 



154 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Gustav Strand Andreen 
Mabel Elnor Arnell 
Carl Johan Arthur Bergren 
Alexander Bernstein 
Charlotte Bjbrndahl 
Carl Gustav Carlson 
Ella Carlson 
Victoria Carlson 
Myrtle Glen Cooper 
Edwin Mirinus Enberg 
Margaret Louise Franing 
Carl Julius Fredriksen 
Elmer Friedlund 
Demetrius Galanos 
Hyman Greenberg 
Edwin Gustafson 
Per Oscar Theodore Johnson 
Carl Alfred Jonsson 
Anna Barbara Kempe 
Merrell Walford Larson 
Cyrus Theodore Lindquist 
Lincoln Julius Lindstrom 
Ethel Mathilda Olson 
Meredith Louis Ostrom 
Ruby Matilda Peterson 
Manne Rask 
Blanche Elna Wangelin 
Arthur James Winter 



Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Anaconda, Mont. 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Moline 

Hallefors, Sweden 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Milan 

Moline 

Kingsburg, Cal. 

Hagia Anna, Greece 

Davenport, Iowa 

Orion 

Chicago 

Vafversunda, Sweden 

Rock Island 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Lynn Center 

Marquette, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Galesburg 

Monmouth 

Milan 

Rock Island 



UNCLASSIFIED AND SPECIAL 

Everett Anderson 
Ethel Julia Barr 
Etta Evans Barr 
Einar Efraim Bergsten 
Bertha Estelle Bertell 
Carl Edwin Blomdahl 
Mabel Eugenia Bohman 
Grace Hildegard Borg 
Ruth Adelia Carlmark 
Wendell Harris Clark 
Martin Conrad Dahlberg 
Hilmore Sophie Asynja Esbjorn 
Ruby Violet Fors 
Grace Catherine Fry 
Gertrude Kathryn Gabelmann 



ACADEMY 

Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Chicago 

Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Milan 

Daggett, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Andover 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



155 



William Patrick Gleason 
Helga Johanna Granere 
Amy Elvira Granlund 
Dora Harshack 
Leona Haywood 
Emelia Jacobson 
Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 
Edna Elizabeth Johnson 
Eric Walfrid Johnson 
Ethel Wilhelmina Johnson 
Gustav Frithiof Johnson 
John Edward Francis Johnson 
Ruth Elizabeth Johnson 
Maia Esther Jurgemeyer 
Frieda Marie Lindblom 
Esther Euphemia Lindell 
Delia Jennie Lundahl 
Edna Viola Magnuson 
Freda Elizabeth Mattson 
Harriette Claire Miller 
Florence Nordstrom 
Edith Emelia Olson 
Cecilia Anna Pearson 
Ernest Leonard Pearson 
Benjamin Edgar Peterson 
Elsie Catherine Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Esther Maria Pihlstrom 
Anna Elfrida Sandberg 
Grace Saville 
Georgia Smith 

Daisy Lorena Eleanora Strand 
Ture Svenonius 
Frida Sofia Thor 
Rosalie Cornelia Tragordh 
Samuel Clarence Trued 
Luther John Valentine 
Laura Frances Woodburn 
Richard Albin Wyman 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Winburne, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Fonda, Iowa 
Cherokee, Iowa 
Moline 

Mistelas, Sweden 
Newport, R. I. 
Moscow, Idaho 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
Lynn Center 
Osceola, Nebr. 
Norcross, Minn. 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Ousby, Sweden 
Moline 
Bishop Hill 
Rock Island 
Elk Point, S. D. 
Forsby, Sweden 
Frewsburg, N. Y. 
Walcott, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Dayton, Iowa 
Stockholm, Sweden 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Princeton 
Swedesburg, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Hillsdale 
Moline 



PREPARATORY 



Anna Anderson 
Philip John Bladel 
Henry Gustaf Hedlund 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Detroit, Mich. 



156 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 

CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



PIANO 

Corinne Altman 

Harold Anderson 

Herbert Anderson 

Hilding Cornelius Anderson 

Lucile Anderson 

Lola May Barker 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Etta Evans Barr 

Rose Barr 

Florence Beckstrom 

Ethel Genevieve Bengston 

Mabel Benson 

Harold Benzon 

Carl Elvir Bergquist 

Mabel Bergquist 

Carl John Arthur Bergren 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Ebba Carlson 

Florence Carlson 

Fairy Ellen Corning 

Letitia Corning 

Wilma Curtis 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Myrtle Josephine Dorman 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Harold Enstam 

Carl Gunnar Erickson 

Hilma Sophia Erickson 

Jennie Etta Sadie Fishwild 

Nellie Florin 

Bessie Forbes 

Ruby Violet Fors 

Gertrude Kathryn Gabelmann 

Minnie Marie Graham 

Tressa Louise Haas 

Linna Cather Hall 

Frances Hanson 

Mabel Cathryn Heath 

Oneta Baye Hollister 

Adeline Howkinson 

Emelia Jacobson 



Plainfield, N. J. 

Moline 

Moline 

Mt. Vernon, Wash. 

Moline 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Laurens, Iowa 

Oakland, Nebr. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Anaconda, Mont. 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Silvis 

Silvis 

Rock Island 

Daggett, Mich. 

Silvis 

Moline 

New Britain, Conn. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Negaunee, Mich. 

East Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Andover 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Hastings, Nebr. 

Moline 

Winburne, Pa. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



157 



Leon Walter Jelinek 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Edna Elizabeth Johnson 

Emil Julius Johnson 

Helen Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Mamie Melinda Johnson 

May Johnson 

Mildred Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Anna Barbara Kempe 

Elwood Carl Holcomb Kraft 

Frieda Marie Lindblom 

Esther Euphemia Lindell 

Wava Catholine Lindstrom 

Delia Jennie Lundahl 

Theodore Lundblade 

Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 

Edna Viola Magnuson 

Naomi Magnuson 

Peter Alfred Martinson 

Frieda Elizabeth Mattson 

Elsa Mauritzson 

Harriette Claire Miller 

Hazel Misner 

Gertrude Jeanette Moody 

Mildred Nelson 

Signe Maria Linnea Nelson 

Florence Nordstrom 

Adele Eugenia Olson 

Edith Emelia Olson 

Harry Edgar Olson 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Cecilia Anna Pearson 

Mrs. Ollie May Penn 

Beulah Peterson 

Elsie Catherine Peterson 

Eunice Peterson 

Goldie Alice Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Mabel Irene Peterson 

Esther Petterson 

Anna Frances Pierson 

Helen Louise Reinemund 



Crete, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Fonda, Iowa 

Ludington, Mich. 

Moline 

Newport, R. I. 

Cambridge 

Moline 

Moline 

Moscow, Idaho 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

Sherrard 

Rock Island 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Chicago 

Lynn Center 

Lynn Center 

Gowrie, Iowa 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Norcross, Minn. 

Milan 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Mediapolis, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Winfield, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Providence, R. I. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Alta, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Rock Island 

Muscatine, Iowa 



158 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Evelyn Rosene 

Glen Gillman Samuelson 

Mrs. Edna Lepper Schlueter 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 

John William Seids 

Georgia Smith 

Ardes Stock 

Daisy Lorina Elnora Strand 

Irene Amy Streed 

Ida Sturm 

Rudolph Nelson Swanson 

Rosalie Cornelia Tragordh 

Samuel Clarence Trued 

Emma Udehn 

Grace Ullemeyer 

Grace Catherine Fry-Wenger 

Alice Wilson 

Laura Frances Woodburn 

Stella Youngquist 



Moline 

Osco 

Davenport, Iowa 

Milan 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Dayton, Iowa 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Boone, Iowa 

Princeton 

Ceresco, Nebr. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Hillsdale 

Moline 



ORGAN 

Ethel Genevieve Bengston 

Bertha Estelle Bertell 

Althea Martha Brown 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Hilma Sophia Erickson 

Ruby Violet Fors 

Amy Elvira Granlund 

Effie Charlotte Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Lydia Wilhelmina Johnson 

Agnes Lamp 

Rudolph Ebenezer Lindstrom 

Mildred Nelson 

Vincent Nordgren 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Edith Emelia Olson 

Rosalie Cornelia Tragordh 

Mrs. Alice Louise Thorpe 

Samuel Clarence Trued 



Oakland, Nebr. 

Chicago 

Moline 

Daggett, Mich. 

Negaunee, Mich. 

Andover 

Rock Island 

Du Bois, Pa. 

Newport, R. I. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Galva 

Rock Island 

Salt Lake City, Utah 

Princeton 

Reynolds 

Ceresco, Nebr. 



VIOLIN 



Frances Cornelia Anderson 
Gustav Strand Andreen 
Israel Edward Barr 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



159 



Matthew Barr 

Mabel Eugenia Bohman 

Louise Katherine Bolin 

Allen Eugene Burton 

Thomas Edward Davis 

Herbert Theodore Day 

Alfaretta Dempsey 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Lewis Boyer Fisher 

Carl Julius Fredriksen 

Helga Granere 

Leona Hammer Haywood 

Carl Holmen 

Genevieve Wood Hunt 

Emelia Jacobson 

Kenneth Stempel Kempe 

Karl Fredrick Kirkman 

Bertha Madeline Kraft 

Andorra Larrison 

Julius Levenstein 

Wava Catholine Lindstrom 

Violet Eulalia Jeanette Malcolm 

Joseph Moore 

Arthur Stowell Musson 

Carl Arthur Leonard Nelson 

Anastasios Tom Nicolaides 

Chester Olson 

Gilbert Christian Olson 

William John Ouart 

Esther Peterson 

Helen Florence lone Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Esther Maria Pihlstrom 

Harold Romme 

Sam Ruben 

Grace Saville 

Robert Schurr 

John Henry Ernest Stapp 

Ludvig Andrew Stapp 

Ernest Leonard Swanson 



Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Essex, Iowa 
Moline 

Winburne, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Sherrard 
Altona 
Moline 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Kewanee 
Orion 

Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Evanston 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Walcott, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Kewanee 



CORNET 



Howard Elmer Johnson 



Moline 



160 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



VOICE 

Arthur Almquist 

Amy Anderson 

Hildegarde Anderson 

Hilding Cornelius Anderson 

Mrs. Esther Andeen 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Sigrid Eleanor Bengtson 

Mabel Bergquist 

Marie Theresa DeVere 

Beata Eleanor Eberhardt 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Harold Enstam 

Carl Gunnar Erickson 

Carl Hjalmar Freeman 

Amy Elvira Granlund 

Oscar Gustafson 

Rudolph Gustaf Hanson 

Oneta Baye Hollister 

Emelia Jacobson 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Edna Elizabeth Johnson 

Effie Charlotte Johnson 

Esther Johnson 

Ethel Matilda Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Leonard Albert Kendall 

Hilda Koch 

Reuben Paul Kron 

Agnes Kronholm 

Esther Euphemia Lindell 

Naomi Magnuson 

John Daniel Mahlstedt 

Violet Eulalia Jeanette Malcolm 

Harriette Claire Miller 

Florence Nordstrom 

Wilbur Nathaniel Palmquist 

Cecilia Anna Pearson 

Elmere Nathaniel Petersen 

Naomi Dorothy Peterson 

Esther Petterson 

Paul Victor Randolph 

Rosina Roberts 

Daisy Lorina Elnora Strand 

Irene Amy Streed 



Andover 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Mt. Vernon, Wash. 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Ludington, Mich. 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Chicago 
Moline 

New Britain, Conn. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Ottumwa, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Funk, Nebr. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Hastings, Nebr. 
Winburne, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Fonda, Iowa 
Du Bois, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moscow, Idaho 
Ottumwa, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Dayton, Iowa 
Moline 
Rockford 
Lynn Center 
Green River 
Altona 

Norcross, Minn. 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Lawton, Iowa 
Providence, R. I. 
Big Rapids, Mich. 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Elk Point, S. D. 
Boone, Iowa 
Sherrard 
Dayton, Iowa 
Moline 






ROLL OF STUDENTS 



161 



David Verner Swanson 
Herbert Carl Morton Swanson 
Joseph Fridolph Youngstrom 



Axtell, Nebr. 
Hepburn, Iowa 
Dayton, Iowa 



PUBLIC SCHOOL 

Ethel Geneveive Bengston 

Sigrid Eleanor Bengtson 

Ruth Cochran 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Amy Granlund 

Lydia Wilhelmina Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Naomi Magnuson 

Lina Colvina Weir 

THEORY 

Lola May Barker 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Florence Beckstrom 

Ethel Geneveive Bengston 

Sigrid Eleanor Bengtson 

Bertha Estelle Bertell 

Mabel Eugenia Bohman 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Hilma Sophia Erickson 

Ruby Violet Fors 

Gertrude Kathryn Gabelmann 

Helga Granere 

Amy Elvira Granlund 

Emelia Jacobson 

Leon Walter Jelinek 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Edna Elizabeth Johnson 

Effie Charlotte Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Esther Euphemia Lindell 

Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 

Edna Viola Magnuson 

Naomi Magnuson 

Harry Edgar Olson 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Elsie Catherine Peterson 

Esther Petterson 



MUSIC 

Oakland, Nebr. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Monmouth 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moscow, Idaho 
Lynn Center 
Rock Island 

Maquoketa, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Laurens, Iowa 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Moline 

Daggett, Mich. 
Moline 

Negaunee, Mich. 
Andover 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Winburne, Pa. 
Crete, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Fonda, Iowa 
Du Bois, Pa. 
Moscow, Idaho 
Rockford 
Chicago 
Lynn Center 
Lynn Center 
Winfield, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Alta, Iowa 
Elk Point, S. D. 



162 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Helen Florence Irene Peterson 
Mrs. Edna Lepper Schlueter 
Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 
Daisy Lorina Elnora Strand 
Rosalie Cornelia Tragordh 
Grace Ullemeyer 
Laura Prances Woodburn 



Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Milan 

Dayton, Iowa 
Princeton 
Rock Island 
Hillsdale 



GLASSES IN HISTORY OF MUSIC, ANALYSIS, PSYCHOLOGY AND 
SIGHT SINGING AND EAR TRAINING 



Lola May Barker 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Etta Evans Barr 

Florence Beckstrom 

Ethel Genevieve Bengston 

Sigrid Eleanor Bengtson 

Mabel Bergquist 

Bertha Estelle Bertell 

Mabel Eugenia Bohman 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Ruth Cochran 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Harold Enstam 

Ruby Violet Fors 

Gertrude Kathryn Gabelmann 

Helga Granere 

Amy Elvira Granlund 

Leona Hammer Haywood 

Emelia Jacobson 

Leon Walter Jelinek 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Edna Elizabeth Johnson 

Effie Charlotte Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Reuben Kron 

Andorra Larrison 

Esther Euphemia Lindell 

Edna Viola Magnuson 

Naomi Magnuson 

Frieda Elizabeth Mattson 

Florence Nordstrom 

Edith Emelia Olson 

Harry Edgar Olson 



Maquoketa, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Laurens, Iowa 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Monmouth 
Daggett, Mich. 
Moline 

New Britain, Conn. 
Andover 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Winburne, Pa. 
Crete, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Fonda, Iowa 
Du Bois, Pa. 
Newport, R. I. 
Moscow, Idaho 
Dayton, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rockford 
Lynn Center 
Lynn Center 
Osceola, Nebr. 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
Winfield, Iowa 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



163 



Helen Isabel Parker 

Cecilia Pearson 

Elsie Catherine Peterson 

Helen Florence lone Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Mabel Irene Peterson 

Esther Petterson 

Paul Randolph 

Grace Saville 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 

Georgia Smith 

Daisy Lorina Elnora Strand 

Herbert Carl Morton Swanson 

Rudolph Nelson Swanson 

David Verner Swanson 

Grace Ullemeyer 

Laura Frances Woodburn 



Rock Island 
Providence, R. I. 
Alta, Iowa 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Geneseo 

Elk Point, S. D. 
Boone, Iowa 
Walcott, Iowa 
Milan 

Rock Island 
Dayton, Iowa 
Hepburn, Iowa 
Boone, Iowa 
Axtell, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Hillsdale 



SCHOOL OF ART 



Hildegard Maria Anderson 
David Edvard Anderson 
Carl Arthur Anderson 
Florence M. Anderson 
Carl W. Anderson 
Clarence Edward Blomberg 
Edwin Blomquist 
Elmer Bernhard Benson 
Alexander Bernstein 
Roger Martin Carlson 
Irene F. Dodson 
Edwin M. Enberg 
Simon E. Fagerstrom 
Alma L. Johnson 
Ruth Elizabeth Johnson 
Mamie Josephine Johnson 
Emelia Jacobson 
Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 
Theodor Samuel Lenz 
Joseph E. Lind 
Carl P. Martinson 
Edna Viola Magnuson 
Alfred Martinson 



Rock Island 
Chicago 

East Tawas, Mich. 
Kearney, Nebr. 
Stronghurst 
Rock Island 
Metropolitan, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Harcourt, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Moscow, Idaho 
Moscow, Idaho 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Winburne, Pa. 
Chicago 

Hawkeye, Iowa 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
St. Charles 
Lynn Center 
Gowrie, Iowa 



164 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Arion Emil Monell 
Nels Albert Nelson 
Anders Wilhelm Nelson 
Rudolph Olson 
Florence E. Olson 
Cecilia Anna Pearson 
Frank E. Peterson 
Victoria Swanbeck 
Eunice Alice Squire 
Paul John Seitz 
Arthur V. Swedberg 
Arthur Sprecher 
Thure Leonard Wisen 
Jennie A. Wassell 



Calumet, Mich. 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Malvern, Iowa 
Laurens, Iowa 
Chicago 

Gladstone, Mich. 
Swea City, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Tripp, S. D. 
Galesburg 
Port Byron 



SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION 



PRIVATE PUPILS 

Ebba Valeria Abrahamson 

Esther Serafia Anderson 

Esther Miriam Andreen 

Arthur Garfield Benson 

John Luther Benson 

Grace Estella Booth 

Ragnar Byrenius 

Gladys Mae Dunleavy 

Edythe Antonia Cordelia Frostrom 

Tressa Louise Haas 

Elva Lorna Hoag 

Alma Louisa Johnson 

John Herman Johnson 

Anna Myrtle Otelia Larson 

Mabel Florence Nelson 

Ethel Mathilda Olson 

Mae Christine Olson 

Helen Florence Irene Peterson 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Trenton 
Persnas, oland 
Rock Island 
Bristow, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Moscow, Idaho 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Reynolds 
Fort Dodge, Iowa 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTS COURSE 

Everett Magnus Anderson Center Sta., Rock Island 

Warren Spencer Bengston Rock Island 

Edward Julius Carlson Mt. Pleasant, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



165 



George Chase 
Wendell Harris Clark 
Benjamin Charles Clarke 
Reeffe Charles Crakes 
Andrew William Danielson 
Rudolph John Erickson 
Joseph Theodore Faust 
Karl Johnson 
George Palm 

Benjamin Edgar Peterson 
Richard Albin Wyman 



Moline 

Milan 

Moline 

Kendall, Mich. 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Negaunee, Mich. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Ludington, Mich. 

Bishop Hill 

Moline 



GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT 

Albert August Anderson 
Albert Leonard Anderson 
Albin Arthur Anderson 
Everett Magnus Anderson 
Harry Waldemar Anderson 
Laurence David Amenoff 
Lola May Barker 
Warren Spencer Bengston 
Herbert Berglund 
Paul Raymond Bjorling 
Charlotte Bjorndahl 
Oscar Edwin Emanuel Blick 
Carl Edwin Blomdahl 
George Joseph Burgart 
Edward Julius Carlson 
Ella Carlson 
Victoria Carlson 
Yngve Carlson 
George Chase 
Wendell Harris Clark 
Benjamin Franklin Clarke 
Roy Monroe Conrad 
Andrew William Danielson 
Beata Eleanor Eberhardt, 
Elin Albertina Eng 
Hilmore Sofia Asynja Esbjorn 
Joseph Theodore Faust 
William P. Gleason 
Helga Johanna Granere 
Charles August Hartman 
Delia Ruth Harris 
Ethel Linnea Isaacson 



COURSE 

Kenora, Ont., Can. 

Orion 

Wahoo, Nebr. 

Center Sta., Rock Island 

Albert City, Iowa 

Altona 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Altona 

Moline 

New Windsor 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Mt. Pleasant, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Milan 

Moline 

Darlington, Ind. 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Chicago 

Jennings, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Taylor Ridge 

Rock Island 

Escanaba, Mich. 



166 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Alice Evelyn Johnson 
Edith Lenore Eileen Johnson 
Eric Walfred Johnson 
John Edward Francis Johnson 
Maia Esther Eva Jurgemeyer 
Hazel Balch Kerr 
Hilda Kronholm 
August Einar Larson 
Florence Agnes Long 
Elliott Monett Lundberg 
Joel Ferdinand Lundquist 
Joseph Meyer John McLennan 
Lorraine Lesle Miller 
Edward William Manglesdorff 
Nellie Agnette Nelson 
Carl Gustaf Okerbloom 
Earle Ferdinand Olson 
Clifford Arnold Olson 
Harry Edgar Olson 
Florence Catherine O'Neil 
George Palm 

Benjamin Edgar Peterson 
Florence Octavia Peterson 
Norvin George Reese 
Fay Vernon Reeves 
Albert Wesley Rehn 
Glenn Gilman Samuelson 
Lester Samuelson 
Anna Elfrida Sandberg 
Grace Saville 

Walter Carl Edward Spencer 
Rudolph Nelson Swanson 
Eva Christine Swedberg 
Frida Sofia Thor 
Cellela Mabel Walker 
Arthur Winter 
Richard Albin Wyman 



Moline 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Cherokee, Iowa 

Newport, R. I. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Rockford 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Rockford 

Morrison 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Orion 

Galesburg 

Winfield, Iowa 

Winfield, Iowa 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. 

Bishop Hill 

Galva 

Bentley, Iowa 

Rock Island 

North Henderson 

Osco 

Orion 

Frewsburg, N. Y. 

Walcott, Iowa 

Portville, N. Y. 

Boone, Iowa 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 



Winifred Abbott 
Anne Anderson 
Lola May Barker 
Herbert Berglund 
Grace Hildegard Borg 
Yngve Carlson 



STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



111 



Martin Emanuel Collins 
Helen C. Deletter 
Beata Eleanor Eberhardt 
Rudolph Philip Englund 
Rudolph John Erickson 
Agnes Cecilia Ericson 
Hilmore Sofia Asynja Esbjorn 
Blanche Catherine Glockhoff 
Dora Harshack 
Carmen Violet Hill 
Alice Evelyn Johnson 
Edith Lenore Eileen Johnson 
Ethel Wilhelmina Johnson 
Maia Esther Eva Jurgemeyer 
Hazel Balch Kerr 
August Einar Larson 
Beatrice Marion Lindshield 
Florence Agnes Long 
Theresa Irene McPadden 
Agnes Anna McGinnis 
Nellie Agnette Nelson 
Earle Ferdinand Olson 
Florence Catherine O'Neil 
Hildegarde Pearson 
Florence Octavia Peterson 
Goldie Alice Peterson 
Naomi Dorothy Peterson 
Pearl Marie Rose 
Alice Marie Souter 
Walter Carl Edward Spencer 
Esther Paula Storbeck 
Joseph William Luther Sundell 
Eva Christine Swedberg . 
Mary Lee Thompson 
Cellela Mabel Walker 



Essex, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Negaunee, Mich. 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Hampton 

Moline 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rockford 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Galesburg 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Moline 

Galva 

Moline 

Fort Dodge, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Portville, N. Y. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Moline 



168 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



ADDENDA AND CORRIGENDA 
Post Graduate 
Sven Gustav Ohman, A. B. New Britain, Conn. 

major subject 1 — English. 
minor subject — Swedish. 



First Class 




Myrtle May Cheney 


Milan 


David Glen Cooper 


Rock Island 


Conservatory 




Helen Anderson (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Helen Becker (Piano) 


Moline 


El vera Carlmark (Piano) 


Moline 


Joseph W. Coyle (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Agnes Elvira Erlander (Organ) 


Burlington, Iowa 


Mona Fedderson (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Harry Herbert Gotberg (Violin) 


Jennings, Mich. 


Mary Louise Hansen (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Mrs. H. C. Hoefle (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Helen Mabel Christine Johnson (Piano) Rock Island 


J. Edwin Johnson (Voice) 


Rock Island 


Gertrude Korn (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Mabel Larson (Organ) 


Swedesburg, Iowa 


Margaret Morrison (Cornet) 


Rock Island 


George Miihleman (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Edith Neer (Piano) 


Erie 


Clara Nelson (Piano) 


Lynn Center 


Earle Ferdinand Olson (Piano) 


Galesburg 


Vera Elizabeth Peterson (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Viola Jeanette Peterson (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Genevieve Pr ingle (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


LeRoy Rosene (Piano) 


Moline 


Rachel Ross (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Waldo Schoessel (Organ) 


Rock Island 


Florence Ullemeyer (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Evelyn Otelia Waller (Piano) 


Moline 


Norma Zaeckler (Voice) 


Davenport, Iowa 


Esther Zismer (Piano) 


Rock Island 


Commercial 




Paul Emil Carins 


Milan 


Edna Lofgren (Post-graduate) 


Moline 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 169 



SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT 
1915—1916 

Theological Seminary: 

Postgraduates 19 

Undergraduates 61 

Special and Hospitants 9 

89 

Collegiate Department: 

Postgraduates 24 

Seniors 39 

Juniors 26 

Sophomores 40 

Freshmen 71 

Special and Unclassified 21 

221 

Academic Department: 

Fourth Class 18 

Third Class 17 

Second Class 21 

First Class 31 

Special and Unclassified 54 

141 

Preparatory Department 3 

Conservatory of Music 209 

School of Art 37 

School of Elocution 18 

Commercial Department 98 

816 
Enrolled more than once 169 

Total 647 

Male Students 400 

Female Students 247 



INDEX 



171 



INDEX. 



Absences, Committee on, 10. 
Academic Department, 12, 16. 
Adelphic Society, 117. 
Admission, College and Academy, 

General Requirements, 15. 

On Certificate, 18. 

Into the Seminary, 51. 
Advanced Credits, 18. 
Aid Fund, 127. 
Alumni Association, 127. 
Appointments, Committee on, 9. 
Archives, 113. 
Art School, 86. 
Athletic Association, 120. 
Athletics, 119. 
Augustana Prohib. League, 120. 

Band, 121. 
Bible Society, 120. 
Biological Laboratory, 112. 
Board of Control: 

Of Athletics, 9. 

Of Debating and Oratory, 118. 
Board of Directors, 4. 
Board and Room, 106. 
Bookkeeping, 92. 
Buildings, 130. 

Calendars : 

Academy, College and Semi- 
nary, 3. 

Commercial Department, 3. 

Conservatory, 66. 
Charter, 131. 
Christianity, 18. 
Class of '85 Scholarship, 129. 
Clef Club, 125. 

Collegiate Department, 12, 14 ff. 
Collegiate Faculty, 14, 15. 
Commercial Department: 

Faculty, 90. 

General Statement, 90. 
Courses of Study, 90 ff. 
Committees, Standing, 9, 10. 
Concordia Society, 117. 
Conservatory of Music, 12, 66 ff. 
Courses of Study: 

Preparatory and Academic, 20 ff. 

College, 22 ff. 

Normal, 49, 50. 

Seminary, 51 ff. 



Postgraduate, in College, 47, 48. 

Postgraduate, in Seminary, 59 ff. 

Conservatory, 68 ff. 

Commercial Department, 90 ff. 

School of Art, 86, 87. 

Elocution, 88, 89. 

Select, 18. 
Credits, Advanced, 18. 
Curator of Archives, 9, 113. 

Debating Clubs: 

Gladstone, 118. 

Webster, 118. 

Torgny, 118. 

Balfour, 118. 
Debating Board of Control, 118. 
Debating League, 119. 
Degrees, Diplomas, and Graduates 

for 1915, 137 ff. 
Denkmann Memorial Library, 108 

ff., 130. 
Departments and Courses: 

Preparatory, 12, 20. 

Academic, 12, 20 ff. 

Collegiate, 12, 22 ff. 

Normal, 12, 49. 

Theological, 12, 51 ff. 

Conservatory, 12, 66 ff. 

Commercial, 13, 90. 

Art, 12, 86, 87. 

Elocution, 88, 89. 
Diplomas, 102. 

Elective Units, 17. 
Elocution, 88. 

Endowment Fund Society, 126. 
Enrolling Officer, 10. 
Enrolment, Regulations, 18. 
Enrolment, Summary, 169. 
Ethnographical Collection, 113. 
Executive Committee of Board, 4. 
Examinations in Music, 82. 
Expenses: 

Board and Room, 106. 

Fees, 106, 107. 

Tuition. See Sub Tuition. 

Faculties: 
General, 5 — 8. 
Collegiate, 14, 15. 
Seminary, 51. 



172 



INDEX 



Conservatory, 66, 67. 

Commercial, 90. 
Forsander, Mrs. N., Scholarship, 

128. 
Forsander, Dr. N., Scholarship, 129. 
Foreign Mission Society, 116. 

General Information, 105, (Cons.) 

82. 
General Statement, 11. 
Government of School, 105. 
Graduation, 47, 51, 102. 
Groups of Studies, 22—24. 
Gymnastics, General, 119. 

Handel Oratorio Society, 122. 
Historical Collections, 113 ff. 
Historical Sketch, 133. 

Iduna Society, 118. 
Information, General, 105. 

Laboratories, 113. 

Ladies' Hall, 107. 

Library and Reading Room, 108 ff. 

Location and Buildings, 130. 

Luther Bible Society, 120. 

Lutherman Chorus, 124. 

Lyceum, 117. 

Male Chorus, 123. 

Matriculation in the Seminary, 51. 

Matron, 10. 

Mission Society, 116. 

Museum, 112. 

Musical Organizations, 121 ff. 

Normal Department, 49, 50. 

Observer, Augustana, 115. 

Officers of the Board, 4. 

Officers and Standing Committees, 

9, 10. 
Olov Rudbeck, 118. 
Oratorio Society, 122. 
Orchestra, 121. 
Organ, Course in, 76. 
Organist's Diploma Course, 70. 
Oriole Ladies' Chorus, 125. 

Penmanship, 95. 
Phonography, 99. 
Phrenokosmian Society, 116. 
Physical Culture, 119. 
Physics and Chemistry, Labora- 
tory, 113. 



Piano, Course in, 74 ff. 
Postgraduate Courses: 

College, 47, 48. 

Seminary, 59 ff. 
Preparatory Department, 20. 
Principal of Ladies' Hall, 10. 
Prohibition League, 120. 

Reading Room, 108. 

Recitation Hours, Commercial De- 
partment, 102. 

Registrar, 10. 

Roll of Students, 137. 

Rules and Regulations: 
Academy and College, 46. 
Seminary, 64. 
Conservatory, 82. 
Postgraduate Study, 47, 64. 

Scholarships, 128, 129. 
School of Art, 86, 87. 
Secretary: 

General Faculty, 5, 9. 
College Faculty, 9. 

Theological Faculty, 9. 

Conservatory Faculty, 9. 

Commercial Faculty, 9. 
Select Courses, 18. 
Seminary, 51 ff. 

Seminary Dormitory Fund, 130. 
Shorthand, 99. 
Societies: 

Adelphic, 117. 

Augustana For. Mission, 116. 

Augustana Endow. Fund, 126. 

Concordia, 117. 

Debating Societies, 118. 

Iduna, 118. 

Olov Rudbeck, 118. 

Phrenokosmian, 116. 

Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 
117. 

Tegner-Forbundet, 118. 
Stenography, 99. 
Students' Aid Fund, 127. 
Students' Union, 115. 
Students, Roll of, 137. 
Studies, Groups of, 22—24. 
Summary of Enrolment, 169. 
Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 117. 
Swedish Language, 18, 43. 

Teacher's Certificate Course, 74. 
Tegner-Forbundet, 118. 
Theological Seminary, 51 ff. 
Theory, Course in, 80. 



INDEX 



173 



Thorstenberg, O. H., Scholarship, 

128. 
Tuition: 

Academy, College, and Normal, 
106. 

Conservatory, 83 ff. 

School of Art, 87. 

Elocution, 89. 

Commercial Department, 103, 
104, 106. 
Typewriting, 100. 



Units for Admission, 15 — 17. 

Vesper Octet, 125. 

Voice, Study of, 72, 76 ff. 

Violin, Course in, 71, 79. 

Wennerberg Chorus, 123. 
Westman, Anna, Stipend, 128. 
Worship, Public, 105. 

Year, Division of, 105. 



HI 



U^ I 



AUGUSTANA BULLETIN 

Issued Quarterly by Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, III. 
SERIES XIII MAY \ t W7 No. 2 



CATALOG 



OF 



Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



1916-1917 

FIFTY-SEVENTH YEAR 



Entered April 18, 1905, at Rock Island, Illinois, as second class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



-. «- 
■ • 






. 



felBRARlf 



CATALOG 



OF 



Angustana College and 
Tkeological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



1916-1917 

Filtij-seventk Year 




ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

AUGUSTANA BOOK CONCERN, PRINTERS AND BINDERS 
1917 



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1917 



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Easter Sunday, April 8. 



MARCH 



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1918 



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Easter Sunday, March 31. Pentecost, May 19. 



School Calendar 



1917 
FALL TERM 

Registration and Examinations for) 9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 
Admission and Promotion (September 3 and 4. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 5. 

Recitations in College, Academy, ConO 

servatory, and Commercial Depart- 19: 20 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 5. 

ment begin J 

(Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 24 
Matriculation for the Seminary ) a nd 25 

Opening Lecture in the Seminary 10 A. M. Wednesday, Sept. 26. 

Reformation Day Wednesday, October 31. 

C Thursday and Friday, Nov. 29 
Thanksgiving Recess j , 30 

Term ends 6 P. M., Thursday, Dec. 20. 

1918 
SPRING TERM 

Recitations in the Conservatory begin 8 A. M., Monday, Jan. 7. 
Registration and Examinations for] 9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion f Jan. 7 and 8. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 9. 

Recitations in College, Academy, and) 

„ • i ^ xx.. ^9:20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 9. 

Commercial Department begin £»-*«■«*• *•» ,,culwua '' ,,a 

Lectures in the Seminary begin 9:20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 16. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary begins 5 P. M., Wednesday, March 20. 

Easter Recess in the College, Acade-] 

my, and Commercial Department iNoon, Thursday, March 28. 

begins J 

Easter Recess ends 8 A. M., Tuesday, April 2. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary ends 8 A. M., Wednesday, April 3. 

Founders' Day Saturday, April 27. 

Recitations and Lectures cease 6 P. M., Friday, May 24. 

Commencement Exercises May 24 — 28. 

FALL TERM 1918 

Registration Sept. 2 and 3. 

Recitations begin Sept. 4. 

Seminary opens Sept. 25. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Board of Directors 



MEMBERS 

Rev. LAWRENCE ALBERT JOHNSTON, D.D., President of Synod, 

ex officio member. 
Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., President 

of the Institution, ex officio member. 

time expires 

Rev. AMANDUS FRIDOLF BERGSTROM, Moline, 111 1917 

Rev. ELOF KARDELL JONSON, Chicago, 111 1917 

Mr. NILS ANTON NELSON, Chicago, 111 1917 

Mr. AUGUSTUS JOHNSON LAURENCE, Paxton, 111 1917 

Rev. A. THEODORE EKBLAD, A.M., Superior, Wis 1918 

Rev. JOHN EKHOLM, Ph.D.. Swedesburg, Iowa 1918 

Mr. ANDREW JOHNSON, M.D., Omaha, Nebr 1918 

Consul LAWRENCE LOUIS MALM, Cleveland, Ohio 1918 

Rev. JOSEPH ALFRED ANDERSON, A.M., Boxholm, Iowa 1919 

Mr. JOHN HENRY HAUBERG, A.B., LL.B., Rock Island, 111 1919 

Mr. KNUT THEODORE ANDERSON, Rock Island, 111 1919 

Rev. GOTTFRED NELSON, Chicago, 111 1919 

Rev. ERIC PETER OLSSON, D.D., Courtland, Kans 1920 

Rev. JOHAN FREDERICK SEEDOFF, Rockford, 111 1920 

Mr. NILS ANDERSON, Burlington, Iowa 1920 

Mr. BYRON LINDGREN, Minneapolis, Minn 1920 

OFFICERS 

Rev. JOS. A. ANDERSON, Boxholm, Iowa, President. 
Rev. A. THEO. EKBLAD, Superior, Wis., Secretary. 
Prof. ANDREW KEMPE, Rock Island, 111., Financial Secretary and 
Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. J. F. SEEDOFF, Pres. Prof. ANDREW KEMPE, ex officio. 

Dr. G. A. ANDREEN, ex officio. Rev. A. F. BERGSTROM. 

Mr. JOHN H. HAUBERG. Mr. NILS ANDERSON. 

Mr. K. THEO. ANDERSON, Sec'y. Rev. JOSEPH A. ANDERSON. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Faculty and Instructors 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

731— 35th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Vice President. 

741— 34th St. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., A.M., 

Secretary of the General Faculty. 

1739— Uth Ave., Moline 



CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

3808— 8th Ave. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Cor. 9th Ave. and 34th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 

741— 34th St. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D.D., R.N.O., 

Professor Emeritus of Church History, Pastoral Theology, etc. 

608— 38th St. 

Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D.D., LL.D., R.N.O., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Hermeneutics, Liturgies, Apologetics and Church Polity. 

3826— 7th Ave. 

: 1) 

Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. CARL OTTO GRANERE, Ph.D., 

Librarian Emeritus. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

626— 38th St. 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

970— 38th St. 

*) Duties performed during the year by Prof. Isidore J. Broman. 



1311— 38th St. 



937— 43rd St. 



6 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, Old Testament Introduction, and Evangelistics. 

825— 35th St. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

842— 44th St. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Physics and Chemistry. 

2829—11% Ave. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A.M., 

Professor of Philosophy, New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Introduction and 

Homiletics. 

1010— 38th St. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

1647— 37th St. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc.B., Ph. B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3906— 7th Are. 

PETER BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3922— 8th Ave. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M.Accts., LL.B. 

Principal of Commercial Department. 

3932— 8th Ave. 

MARCUS SKARSTEDT, A.M., B.L.S., 

Librarian. Assistant Professor of German in the Academy. 

1619— 28th St. 

JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A.A.G.O., 

Director of Conservatory of Music, Professor of Piano, Organ and Theory, and Director of 

Handel Oratorio Chorus and Wennerberg Male Chorus. 

1000— 38th St. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy. 



1418— 33rd St. 



Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Professor of Biblical Theology, Church History, Symbolics, Pastoral Theology, and 

Propedeutics. 

1739 — 11th Ave., Moline 



OLOF GRAFSTRoM, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

LILLIE CERVIN, B.S., 

Teaclier of Piano and Assistant on the Pipe Organ. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 



831— 44th St. 



3814^7th Ave. 



727— 19th St. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 7 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music, and Director of Orchestra. 

3908— 7th Ave. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B.S., 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. Teacher of Arithmetic. 

1408— 16th Ave. 

ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL.B., 

Teacher of Penmanship, Bookkeeping and Typewriting, and Secretary of Commercial Faculty. 

4211— 7th Ave. 

LEWIS BODMAN CANTERBURY, 

Professor of Voice and Sight Singing. 

2507 Fulton Ave., Davenport, Iowa 

WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 

Teacher of Public School Music, Piano, and Harmony. 

902 — 5th Ave., Moline 

ETTA SETTERDAHL, 

Teacher of Shorthand. 



ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Teacher of Piano. 

ALTHEA BROWN, 

Teacher of Voice. 



630— 41st St. 



715— 3rd St., Moline 



1202— 12th St., Moline 



ISIDORE JOHN BROMAN, A.B., A.M., 

Professor of Biology, Geology and Astronomy. 

738— 34th St. 

CONRAD JOHN IMMANUEL BERGENDOFF, A.M., 

Professor of Education and Assistant Professor of English. 

4400— 7th Ave. 

ARVID SAMUELSON, 

Professor of Piano, Advanced Piano Pedagogy, and Director of Oriole Club. 

1621— 29Y 2 St. 

KARL GOTTFRID LARSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Physics and Chemistry. 



OTTO HENRY BOSTR3M, A.M., Ph.D., 

Instructor in Ancient History and Swedish, Academy. 



966— 38th St. 



724— 35th St. 



EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

1428— 12th St., Moline 

LAWRENCE DE WITTE LUNDBERG, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

960— 38th St. 
MAGNUS ARTHUR JOHNSON, 

Assistant in English. 

805— 41st St. 



Milan 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

DAVID EDWARD ANDERSON, 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

705— 38th St. 

ELMER THEODORE PETERSON, 

Assistant in Biology. 

919 — 43rd St. 

HAZEL ANDERSON BRASHEAR, 

Assistant in English. 

1113— 12th Ave., Moline 

ALLEN TOWNSEND EDDY, 

Assistant in English. 

EDMOND RUSSELL FREDRICKSON, 

Assistant in Arithmetic. 

ARTHUR WALDEMAR SWEDBERG, 

Assistant in Arithmetic. 

EDNA ERIKA WILSON, 

Assistant in United States History. 

REEFFE CHARLES CRAKES, M. Accts., 

Assistant in Bookkeeping. 

WALTER CARL EDWARD SPENCER, Gbad. Acc 

Assistant in Bookkeeping. 

CARL HARRY KALQUIST, 

Teacher of Wind Instruments, and Director of Band. 

Camp Lowden, Springfield 

ANTON DAVID UDDEN, A.B., 

Professor Elect of Biology, Geology, Physics and Astronomy. 



1124- 


-38th 


St. 




Dormitory 


831- 


—41st 


Sc. 


602- 
3T., 


-39th 


St. 


707- 


-38th 


St. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Officers and Standing Committees 



Matriculation Committee in Seminary — Rev. Dr. L. A. Johnston, Presi- 
dent of the Augustana Synod, Pres. G. A. Andreen, Professors C. E. 
Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Secretary), C. J. Sodergren, and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Appointments — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professords C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren, C. J. Sodergren, S. J. 
Sebelius (Secretary), and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Students' Aid — President G. A. Andreen, Professors 
C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Treasurer), C. J. Sodergren (Secre- 
tary), Adolf Hult, C. W. Foss, C. L. E. Esbjorn, J. Mauritzson (Chair- 
man), and S. J. Sebelius (Vice Chairman). 

Library and Museum Committee — President G. A. Andreen (Chair- 
man), Marcus Skarstedt (Secretary), Professors C. J. Sodergren, J. 
Mauritzson, Adolf Hult, and A. W. Kjellstrand. 

Library Staff — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt, A.M., B.L.S., Librarian; Dru- 
silla Vera Erickson, Library assistant; Mamie Melinda Johnson, Library 
assistant; Simon Fagerstrom, student Library assistant. 

Board of Control of Public Meetings — President G. A. Andreen 
(Chairman), Professors C. J. Sodergren, J. Mauritzson (Secretary), 
J. Victor Bergquist, and A. Kempe. 

Board of Control of Athletics — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors C. A. Blomgren, Peter Benzon, A. R. Wallin, A. Kempe 
(Treasurer), Messrs. Edgar Johnson, Arthur Swedberg, R. M. Conrad 
(Manager), and Julius Johnson (Secretary). 

Board of Control of Forensics — President G. A. Andreen, Prof. A. 
Kempe, Rev. A. F. Bergstrom, Dr. E. F. Bartholomew, Dr. C. W. Foss, 
Lael Johnson, H. R. Lundgren, Leonard Kendall, and Simon Fagerstrom. 

Curator of Archives — Prof. C. W. Foss. 

Librarian and Curator of Museum — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt. 

Secretary of General Faculty — Prof. Adolf Hult. 

Secretary of Theological Faculty — Prof. C. J. Sodergren. 

Secretary of College Faculty — Prof. Marcus Skarstedt. 

Secretary of Conservatory Faculty — Miss Althea Brown. 

Secretary of Commercial Faculty — Prof. A. Milton. 

Class Guardians in Seminary — Senior: Prof. C. E. Lindberg; Middle: 
Prof. C. J. Sodergren; Junior: Prof. C. A. Blomgren. 

Class Guardians in College and Academy — Senior: Prof. G. A. An- 
dreen; Junior: Prof. S. J. Sebelius; Sophomore: Prof. E. F. Bartholo- 
mew; Freshman: Prof. C. W. Foss; Fourth Class: Prof. C. L. Esbjorn; 



10 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Third Class: Prof. L. W. Kling; Second Class: Prof. W. E. Cederberg; 
First Class: Prof. A. R. Wallin; Preparatory Class: Prof. A. W. Kjell- 
strand. 

Class Guardians in Conservatory — Professor J. Victor Bergquist and 
Miss Lillie Cervin. 

Class Guardians in Commercial Department — Professor A. Kempe 
and Miss Etta Setterdahl. 

Committee on Adsences, Seminary — Prof. C. J. Sodergren. 

Committee on Absences, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. E. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Adsences, Commercial Department — Miss Etta Setter- 
dahl. 

Committee on Absences, Conservatory Department — Prof. J. Victor 
Bergquist. 

Enrolling Officer and Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. E. 
Esbjorn. 

Assistant Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. Peter Benzon. 

Program Committee, College and Academy — Professors P. Benzon and 
C. L. E. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Student Organizations — General Faculty, Professors 
I. M. Anderson, C. J. Sodergren, and J. Victor Bergquist. 

Committee on Student Organizations, College and Academy — Profes- 
sors C. L. E. Esbjorn, A. W. Kjellstrand, and I. M. Anderson. 

Committee on Curriculum — Professors C. L. E. Esbjorn, L. W. Kling, 
and W. E. Cederberg. 

Committee on Scholarships — Professors C. W. Foss, S. J. Sebelius, and 
P. Benzon. 

Committee on Rules, College and Academy — Prof. L. W. Kling. 

Editor of Catalog — Pres. G. A. Andreen. 

Principal of Ladies' Hall — Mrs. Olive Rydholm. 

Matron — Mrs. Hilda Watson. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



General Statement 



Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned and supported 
by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod of North America. While 
it is, therefore, a denominational institution, and as such aims to serve, 
primarily, the interests of the Lutheran Church, it is not sectarian in 
any narrow sense of the term. It throws its doors open to all who 
desire a liberal education based upon the Christian religion and perme- 
ated by the Christian spirit. Its original scope, which was that of a 
school for the education of ministers of the gospel, has from time to 
time been broadened, so that at the present time the institution, while 
retaining the Theological Seminary as a university department, aims 
to prepare, directly or indirectly, for all occupations and professions, 
by giving, in a variety of departments, the general culture or special 
training which modern conditions require. Its courses of instruction 
are patterned after the most modern and approved models, and qualita- 
tively, at least, Augustana College aims to be in the front rank of 
American institutions of learning. The English language is used as a 
medium of instruction in all subjects, except the Swedish language 
and literature, and some of the theological branches. The subject of 
Swedish, however, naturally occupies a prominent position in the 
curriculum. Indeed the most ample facilities are provided for the study 
of the language, history and literature of the Northland. This not 
only because the institution is mindful both of its origin and of its 
future mission as an exponent of Swedish-American culture, but because 
it studies to supply the present day practical needs of its students. 

All the departments of the institution, except the Theological Semi- 
nary, are open to students of both sexes. 

The location of the institution is such as to leave little to be desired 
on the score of accessibility, healthfulness, and beauty of surroundings. 
It is the object of the management to throw about the student all the 
influences which favor a healthy and harmonious physical, mental, and 
moral development. 



12 AUGT7STAXA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Departments and Courses 



The institution comprizes the following eight Departments or 
Schools: 

I. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, in which boys and girls 
deficient in common school branches are prepared for admission to the 
Academy. 

II. THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT has in view the twofold object. 
first, of preparing students for entering College, and, secondly, of afford- 
ing young men and women whose circumstances do not permit their 
taking a college course the opportunity of acquiring a more complete 
general education than can be obtained in the common schools. 

III. THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT is designed to give the 
systematic discipline in liberal studies usually required for the bacca- 
laureate degree. The curriculum is arranged on a combined "group" 
and elective system, and the degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
all who successfully complete the course of study in any group of this 
department. 

IV. THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT is designed to prepare for 
teaching in public or parochial schools. See College Department: 
Education and Teachers' Certificates. 

V. THE THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT affords instruction and 
training in all the theoretical and practical subjects entering into a 
proper preparation for the gospel ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

VI. THE POST-GRADUATE DEPARTMENT offers courses leading 
to advanced degrees in literary and scientific as well as theological 
studies, under the direction of the Collegiate and Theological Faculties 
respectively. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts, see Collegiate 
Department, Post-Graduate Courses. 

For courses leading to advanced theological studies, see Theological 
Seminary, Post-Graduate Courses. 

VII. THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND SCHOOL OF ART. 
the former of which embraces four distinct courses: Preparatory; a 
Teachers' Certificate course, extending usually over three years and 
designed to train teachers of music; a Diploma course of one additional 
year, designed to furnish a thoro musical education; and a Post- 
graduate course of two years, intended for those who desire to pursue 
higher musical studies. In the School of Art instruction is given in 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

Drawing and various branches of Painting, and also in Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 

VIII. THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT affords young men and 
women opportunities for acquiring a thoro business training under 
Christian influences. The courses of study are the same as those of 
other first-class business colleges. The course in Phonography and 
Typewriting aims principally to fit young men and women for posi- 
tions as stenographers or private secretaries. The instruction is indi- 
vidual, and so suited to the peculiarities of each student as to bring 
out the best results possible. The course in Penmanshap is designed 
to meet the requirements of those who wish to become teachers of pen- 
manship and pen art, or who desire to obtain positions as policy writers, 
designers, engrossers, etc. 



14 AUGTJSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The Collegiate, Academic and 
Preparatory Departments 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Political Science. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 

*) 

Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

Rev. JULES G5TE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A.M., Ph.D., 

Prfoessor of Physics and Chemistry. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc.B., Ph. B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

PETER BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

MARCUS SKARSTEDT, A.M., B.L.S., 
Librarian. Assistant Professor of German, Academy. Secretary of the Faculty. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy. 
l ) Duties performed during year by Prof. I. J. Broman. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 15 

ISIDORE JOHN BROMAN, A.B., A.M., 

Professor of Biology, Geology and Astronomy. 

CONRAD JOHN IMMANUEL BERGENDOFF, A.M., 

Professor of Education and Assistant Professor of English. 

OLOF GRAFSTRoM, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B.S., 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M.Accts., LL.B. 

Instructor in Civics, Academy, Fall term. 

KARL GOTTFRID LARSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Physics and Chemistry, Academy. 

EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

OTTO HENRY BOSTRoM, A.M., Ph.D., 
Instructor in Ancient History and Swedish, Academy. 

MAGNUS ARTHUR JOHNSON, 

Assistant in English. 

LAWRENCE DE WITTE LUNDBERG, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Fall term. 

DAVID EDWARD ANDERSON, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Spring term. 

ELMER THEODORE PETERSON, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Spring term. 

HAZEL ANDERSON BRASHEAR, 

Assistant in Preparatory English, Fall term. 

ALLEN TOWNSEND EDDY, 

Assistant in Preparatory English, Spring term. 

EDMOND RUSSELL FREDRICKSON, 

Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic, Spring term. 

ARTHUR WALDEMAR SWEDBERG, 

Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic, Spring term. 

EDNA ERIKA WILSON, 

Assistant in Preparatory United States History, Spi'ing term-. 



ANTON DAVID UDDEN, A.B., 

Professor Elect of Biology, Geology, Physics and Astronomy. 



16 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Applicants for admission must furnish satisfactory evidence of good 
moral character and of such scholarship as will enable them successfully 
to pursue the courses of study in the classes to which they are assigned. 
Students coming from other institutions, whether high schools, acad- 
emies, or colleges, should present a properly certified, detailed state- 
ment of their work at such institutions. This statement, for which a 
blank, will be furnished on application, should, if possible, be in the 
hands of the President of the institution before the fifteenth day of 
August in case the student expects to enter in September, and before 
the fifteenth day of December when the student expects to enter in the 
following January. It is desirable that a catalog of the institution 
attended should accompany the credits. 

THE ACADEMY 
For admission to the Academy an ordinary common-school education 
is required. Applicants for admission deficient in the common-school 
branches will be assigned to the Preparatory Department. 

THE COLLEGE 
A candidate will be admitted into the Freshman class upon presenta- 
tion of fifteen entrance units as defined by the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, viz.: 

English 3 units 

One Foreign Language 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

Electives 6 units 



Total 15 units 

The electives must be made up from the subjects in the list below. 
No subject is accepted for an amount less than the minimum or greater 
than the maximum mentioned in the list, and not more than four units 
may be offered in vocational subjects. 

Elective Units 
Christianity will be credited hour for hour. Maximum of 

credits allowed 14 credits 

Civics V2 or 1 unit 

Drawing. Art Drawing % unit 

Mechanical Drawing Ms to 2 units 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 17 

Elocution % unit 

Economics % unit 

English % or 1 unit 

Foreign Language. French 1 to 4 units 

German 1 to 4 units 

Greek 1 to 3 units 

Latin 1 to 4 units 

History y 2 to 3 units 

History of Education y 2 unit 

Mathematics. Algebra, Advanced y 2 unit 

Arithmetic, Commercial or Advanced % to 1 unit 

Geometry, Solid and Spherical y 2 unit 

Trigonometry, Plane % unit 

Music y 2 or 1 unit 

Pedagogy y 2 unit 

Psychology y 2 unit 

Science. Astronomy y 2 unit 

Botany y 2 or 1 unit 

Chemistry y 2 or 1 unit 

Geology y 2 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

Physiography y 2 or 1 unit 

Physiology y 2 or 1 unit 

Zoology y 2 or 1 unit 

Swedish 1 to 4 units 

Vocational Subjects 

Advanced Accounting y 2 to 2 units 

Agriculture % to 2 units 

Bookkeeping y 2 to 2 units 

Commercial Geography % to 2 units 

Commercial Law y 2 to 2 units 

Domestic Science y 2 to 2 units 

Elementary Law % to 2 units 

Manual Training % to 2 units 

Stenography and Typewriting y 2 to 2 units 

Group Prerequisites 

The electives should include the "prerequisites" of the group the 
student wishes to enter. (See the statement of group requirements 
under Outline of Courses of Study, College). A candidate lacking any 
of these prerequisites will have the opportunity of making them up in 
the Academy. 

College Catalog 2 



18 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

ADVANCED CREDITS 

No advanced credits will be given to candidates for admission to 
College, except 

1) for work of a distinctively college grade, in which case the candi- 
date must pass an examination in such work upon entering Col- 
lege; and 

2) for the work done by graduates of our own Academy in excess 
of the 15 units required for admission into College, for which extra 
work 10 college credits will be allowed. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATES 

Applicants furnishing certificates of work successfully completed at 
any institution of a grade equal to that of Augustana College or at any 
high school or academy on the accredited list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be given credit for 
such work without examination. In all other cases applicants for 
admission will be admitted by examination or on probation. No student 
will be received into the Freshman class who lacks more than 1 unit 
in the number of the required entrance credits. All entrance conditions 
must be removed within a year. For dates of examination for admis- 
sion see Calendar, page 3. 

SELECT COURSES 

Students who do not wish to take a full course may select such 
studies in any department as they are prepared to pursue to advantage. 
But all such select courses are subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

ENROLMENT 

Students are not enrolled in any department of instruction until they 
have registered in the President's office, and have paid their tuition 
for the term in the Treasurer's office. 

Applicants may be received at any time, but prompt attendance at the 
opening of each term must be considered the rule, as work in all classes 
begins promptly on the first day, and students coming later are at a 
great disadvantage. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Every student is required to pursue the study of Christianity during 
each term of his residence at the institution. But no student is re- 
quired to make up any courses in Christianity below the class in which 
he is first enrolled. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 19 

SWEDISH 

A very full course in the Swedish language and literature may be 
taken in connection with each of the groups in College. 

It should not, however, be inferred that a student must either take 
no Swedish at all or else the entire course. He may take up any course 
for which he is properly qualified and may then discontinue the study 
at the end of any complete course. 

It should be added that for the benefit of high school graduates and 
other students coming from schools where no opportunity has been 
offered for the study of Swedish, a three hour course in Swedish Gram- 
mar will be given thruout the first year in College, thus affording a 
reasonable good, tho brief, preparation for the study of Swedish litera- 
ture. Students of Swedish parentage are urged to devote as much time 
as possible to the study of the language of their forefathers. Senti- 
mental considerations aside, the practical advantages of such study to 
the clergyman, the teacher, the physician, the lawyer, the business 
man, the cultured man in any walk of life, are sufficiently obvious 
without being specially pointed out. 



20 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 



Outline of Courses of Study. 



Note. In the following schedules the numeral in parenthesis after 
each subject denotes the number of the course as described under 
"Courses of Instruction" (pp. 24 and ft). The other numeral after each 
subject denotes the number of "credits" for the course in question and 
corresponds to the number of recitations in the subject per week for 
one term — two hours of laboratory work, drawing, or elocution counting 
the same as one recitation. 



PREPARATORY 


DEPARTMENT 






FALL TEBM 

Bible Readings (1) 
Arithmetic (1) 
English (1) 
Geography (1) 
Penmanship (1) 
U. S. History (1) 


2 
5 
5 
3 

2 
5- 


-22 


SPRING TEBM 

Bible Readings (2) 
Arithmetic (2) 
English (2) 
Geography (2) 
Penmanship (2) 
U. S. History (2) 


2 
5 
5 
3 
2 
5- 


-22 




ACADEMY 








FIRST CLASS 






FALL TEBM 

Bible Geography (3) 
Algebra (3) 
English (3) 
Latin (3) 
Physiography (3) 


2 
5 
4 
5 

4- 


-20 


SPRING TERM 

Bible Geography (4) 
Algebra (4) 
English (4) 
Latin (4) 
Botany (4) 


1 
5 
5 
5 

4- 


-20 




SECOND CLASS 






FALL TERM 

Biblical Biography (5) 
General History (5) 
English (5) or Swedish (o 
Latin (5) 
Plane Geometry (5) 


l 
5 
) 4 
5 
5- 


-20 


SPRING TERM 

Biblical Biography (6) 
General History (6) 
English (6) or Swedish (6) 
Latin (6) 
Plane Geometry (6) 


1 
5 
4 
5 
5—20 




THIRD CLASS 







FALL TERM 

Bible Teachings (7) 1 

English (7) 4 

Any three of the following: 

Latin (7) 5 

German (7) 5 

Algebra (7) 5 

Zoology (7) 5 

Physics (7) 5—20 



SPRING TEBM 

Bible Teachings (8) 1 

English (8) 4 

Any three of the following: 

Latin (8) 5 

German (8) 5 

Solid Geometry (8) 5 

Physiology (8) 5 

Physics (8) 5—20 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 21 

FOURTH CLASS 

FALL TEEM SPRING TERM 

History of Missions (9) 1 History of Missions (10) 1 

English (9) 4 English (10) 4 

Any three of the following : Any three of the following : 

Latin (9) 5 Latin (10) 5 

German (9) 5 German (10) 5 

Chemistry (9) 5 Chemistry (10) 5 

Catechetical Training (9b) 5 Swedish (10) 5 

Civics (9) 5—20 United States History (10) 5—20 

GRADUATION FROM THE ACADEMY 
The completion of the following units is required for graduation from 
the Academy: 

English 3 

Latin 2 

Algebra 1 

Geometry 1 

Science (Physiography and Botany) 1 

History 1 

Elective 7 

Total 16=160 credits. 

The regular (not elective) courses in Christianity are also required, 
except that no student is required to make up any courses in Chris- 
tianity below the class in which he is first enrolled. 

COLLEGE 
The studies offered in the College are arranged in ten parallel courses 
or "groups" with leading subjects as follows: 
I. Classical Languages. 
II. Modern Languages. 

III. Latin and Science. 

IV. Physical Science. 
V. Biological Science. 

VI. Mathematics. 
VII. English. 
VIII. History. 
IX. Education. 
X. Commerce. 
The groups are assumed to be equally difficult and honorable and are 
designed to promote specialization along some particular line of study 
of the student's own choice, while at the same time insisting upon 
certain fundamental disciplines with which it is believed every educated 
man of the present day should be familiar. 



22 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

The following requirements in Science and Foreign Language apply 
to all the groups: 

General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 

A. Science. A student who presents less than two units of science 
for admission must earn not less than six college credits in science. 

B. Foreign Language. A student who presents less than four units 
of foreign language for admission is required to take two years of 
foreign language in college. Those offering four or more units for 
admission are required to take one year in college. 

I. The Classical Group. 
Prerequisite: four units of Latin. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History— Greek (11), Roman (12) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Greek (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 28 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Christianity and electives 68 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

II. The Modern Language Group. 
Prerequisite: two units of German. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History — Medieval (13), Modern (14) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

German (11), (12), (13), (14) 16 

French (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 26 

Christianity and electives 60 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

III. The Lattn-Science Group. 
Prerequisites: four units of Latin, one unit of Chemistry, and one unit 

of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11, (12), or (13), (14) or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 



AUGTTSTANA COLLEGE 23 

Biology (11), (12) or (21), (22) 8 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 72 " 

120 

IV. The Physical Science Group. 
Prerequisites: one unit of Physics, one unit of Chemistry, and one-half 

unit of Advanced Algebra. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12), (13), (14), (23), (24) 24 

Physics (21), (22), (23), (24) 10 

Mathematics (11), (12) 8 

Christianity and electives 60 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

V. The Biological Science Group. 
Prerequisites: one unit of Physics and one unit of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Drawing (Biological) (15), (16) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 

Biology (11), (12), (21), (22) 16 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and Electives 70 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VI. The Mathematical Group. 

Prerequisites: a half unit of Advanced Algebra and a half unit of Solid 

and Spherical Geometry. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Drawing (Mechanical) (15), (16) 4 

Mathematics (11), (12), (17), (18), (21), (22), also (23), 

(24), or (25), (26), or (27), (28) 28 

Physics (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 62 

120 



24 AUGUSTAZNA COLLEGE 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VII. The English Gboup. 

English (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22), (23), (24), (25), 

(26), (27), (28) 30 credits 

History — English (15), American (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) 2 

Christianity and electives 82 " 

120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VIII. The History Gboup. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (21), (22) or 

(24), (25), (26) 30 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Economics (21) , (22) 6 

Christianity and electives 72 

120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

IX. The Education Gboup. 
Prerequisite: a half unit of Civics. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (13), (14), (16) 9 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Psychology (11) 3 

Education (12), (13), (14), (21), (22), (23), (24) 23 

Christianity and electives 73 

120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

X. The Commercial Gboup. 

English (11), (12), (21), (22) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Commerce (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (21), (22), 

(23), (24), (25), (26), (27), (28) 38 

Psychology (11) 3 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 25 

Economics (21), (22) 6 

Christianity and electives 55 " 



120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The following courses of study are numbered by terms, the school 
year being divided into two terms, Fall and Spring. The odd numbers 
designate the Fall term courses and the even numbers those of the 
Spring term. Courses 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 are the Fall term courses of the 
Preparatory class, the First, the Second, the Third, and the Fourth 
classes of the Academy, respectively, while the numbers 2, 4, 6, 8, and 
10 indicate the Spring term courses of the same classes. In College, 
Freshman and Sophomore courses are numbered from 11 to 20, and 
Junior and Senior courses are numbered from 21 up. No elective course 
will be given unless a sufficient number of students apply for the same. 

ASTRONOMY 
COLLEGE 

21. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Reading of text-book; lectures; practise in the identification 
of constellations and stars and in the finding of the positions of 
the members of the solar system, and in the use of a small tele- 
scope. 1 hour. 

22. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Continuation of Course 21. 1 hour. 

23. Spherical and Theoretical Astronomy. 

Time, latitude, and longitude determination. The elements of 
celestial mechanics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 18, 21; Astron- 
omy 21, 22. 2 hours. 

24. Spherical and Theoretical Astronomy. 

Continuation of Course 23. 2 hours. 

BIOLOGY 

For laboratory fees see General Information. 
ACADEMY 
4. Elementary Botany. 

Reading of text-books; examinations of a series of types of 
the larger divisions of the plant kingdom; a brief course in the 



26 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

general classification of plants; drills in descriptive terminology 
by means of charts; determination of seventy-five species of 
phenoganis. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

7. Elementary Zoology. 

Recitations from a text-book and lectures on elementary mor- 
phology; dissection of ten or twelve types, vertebrates and in- 
vertebrates; determination of about 200 museum specimens. 
Should be elected by all who wish to take Advanced Zoology. 
Three hours recitations and two periods of two hours each lab- 
oratory work. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

8. Elementary Physiology. 

Text-book recitations, lectures, and demonstrations. The labo- 
ratory work will supplement the recitations with experiments, 
dissections, and the examination of anatomical preparations and 
models. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

COLLEGE 

11. Invertebrate Zoology. 

Recitations, lectures, reference reading and laboratory work 
upon the morphology, physiology and life history of the principal 
types of invertebrate animals. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

12. Vertebrate Zoology. 

Recitations, lectures, reference reading and laboratory work 
upon the morphology, physiology and life history of the principal 
types of vertebrates. The comparative anatomy of various types 
will also be considered. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

21. Physiological Botany. 

Recitations, lectures and reading of reference works; qualita- 
tive and quantitative experiments upon the various physiological 
activities of plants. Applications of plant physiology to agri- 
culture will also be considered. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 



atjgtjstana college 27 

22. Morphological Botany. 

Recitations, lectures and reference reading upon the structures 
and relationships of the various groups of the plant kingdom. 
The laboratory work will consist in staining and mounting and 
the examination of plant structures by microscopic methods. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

BOTANY 

See Biology. 

CHEMISTRY 

For laboratory -fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 
9 and 10. Elementary Chemistry. 

Class-room and laboratory work. 

This is a beginners' course designed to meet the requirements 
of those who can devote only one year to chemistry. It also 
serves as an introduction to a more systematic study of the 
subject. 

Three hours of class exercises and four hours of laboratory 
work turnout the year. Each course 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Inorganic Chemistry. 

This is a course in the fundamental principles of chemistry. 
The work is based on a course of laboratory experiments, from 
which the subject is developed and amplified by individual in- 
struction in the laboratory and class-room. Such texts as Alex- 
ander Smith's "General Chemistry for Colleges," or W. A. Noyes' 
"Inorganic Chemistry" indicate the scope of the work. 

Two hours lectures and recitations, four hours laboratory 
practise thruout the year. Each course 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

13. Qualitative Analysis. 

This course includes the chemistry involved in the analytical 
separations and tests of the common metals and acids, and a 
complete qualitative analysis of some commercial substances. 

Two hours lectures and recitations, four hours laboratory prac- 
tise during the first semester. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 



28 augustan a college 

14. Quantitative Analysis. 

The course comprises the quantitative analysis, by gravimetric 
and volumetric methods, of a few selected minerals and com- 
mercial substances. 

One hour lecture and recitation work, six hours laboratory 
practise during the second semester. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

21. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 

Analysis of silicates, alloys, iron and steel, assay of gold and 
silver ores. 
One hour lectures, six hours laboratory practise. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

22. Organic Chemistry. 

A theoretical and experimental study of the aliphatic and aro- 
matic series of carbon compounds. Prerequisites: Courses 11 
and 12. 

Two hours recitations, four hours laboratory practise. 4 credits 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

23 and 24. Physical Chemistry. 

The gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter, stoichiometry, 
chemical and physical equilibria and the phase rule, chemical 
dynamics, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, actinochemistry. 
Prerequisites: Courses 11, 12, 13 and 14. 

Two hours recitations and lectures, four hours laboratory prac- 
tise thruout the year. Each course 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Instruction in the science of the Christian religion is intended to 
supply an essential element in a liberal education with a view to com- 
pleteness of character. Aside from its inherent worth and its bearing 
on the higher issues of life, it also aims to provide such information 
and to foster such principles as will enable the graduate to discharge 
the duties of Christian citizenship, and in every vocation to achieve 
something more than material success. 

PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Bible Readings. 

Text-book by Schmauk. Each course 2 hours. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 29 

ACADEMY 

3 and 4. Bible Geography. 

Geography of Palestine and other Bible lands, Babylonia, Egypt, 
Asia Minor, etc., in a historical setting. 
Text-book: Schmauk, Bible Geography. 

Course 3, 2 hours; Course 4, 1 hour. 

5 and 6. Biblical Biography. 

A study of the leading characters in the Bible. 

Text-book: Whitteker, Bible Biography. Each course 1 hour. 

7 and 8. Bible Teachings. 

An elementary course in Christian doctrine and morality. 
Text-book : Joseph Stump, Bible Teachings. Each course 1 hour. 

9 and 10. History of Foreign Missions. 

Text-books: Howe, A Brief History of Missions; Smith, The 
Uplift of China. Each course 1 hour. 

9b. Catechetical Training (elective). 

This course is designed especially for students who expect to 
teach in the parochial or Sunday schools of our Church. The 
course will contain the following features: Review of Catechism 
and Bible History; principles and methods of teaching; practical 
exercises. 

Text-book, lectures and notes. Given in Swedish. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Bible Literature. 

The course aims to set forth the story of the Bible as a whole; 

how its various books came to be written and what results they 

achieved; and, finally, how these books were preserved thru the 

centuries and thus handed down to us. 

Text-book: Hunting, The Story of the Bible. Each course 1 hour. 

13 and 14. The Life of Christ. 

An historical study of the life and teaching of our Lord based 
on the four Gospels. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book. Notes. Two sections in 
English, one in Swedish. Each course 1 hour. 

21 and 22. Church History. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book. Notes and lectures. 
One section in English, one in Swedish. Each course 2 hours. 



30 augustan a college 

23. Messages of St. Paul. 

A study of select portions of the doctrinal letters of St. Paul, 
with special introduction to each letter; assigned topics for dis- 
cussion. 2 hours. 

Alternative : 

25. Christian Doctrine. 

The essentials of the doctrines of the Christian religion. 
Text-book: Xorbeck, Troslara. 2 hours. 

24. The Social Institutions and Ideals of the Bible. 

A study of the elements of Hebrew life in their development 
from the beginnings to the time of Christ, and of the social 
teachings of the Prophets, of the Sages, and of Jesus. 

Recitations from text-book. Notes. 2 hours. 

Alternative: 

26. Chbistian Doctrine. 2 hours. 

28. Catechetical Training (elective). 

This course is designed especially for students who expect to 
teach in the parochial or Sunday schools of our Church. The 
course will contain the following features: History of Christian 
Education after the Reformation; review of Catechism and Bible 
History; principles and methods of teaching; practical exercises. 

Recitations from text-book. Lectures and notes. Given in 
Swedish. 2 hours. 

CIVICS 

See Political Science. 

COMMERCE 
COLLEGE 

11 and 12. The Mathematics of Investments. 

Interest and annuities; amortization of interest-bearing debts; 
valuation of bonds; sinking funds; depreciation; elements of life 
insurance. Each course 3 hours. 

13 and 14. Commercial Law. 

Contracts; negotiable instruments; agency; bailments; part- 
nership; corporations; personal property; real property; torts; 
suretyship, guaranty and insurance; management of decendents' 
estates; the intestate law, wills and trust estates; study of se- 
lected cases. Each course 2 hours. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 31 

15 and 16. Advanced Accounting. 

The application of accounting to bookkeeping; study of balance 
sheets and trading and profit and loss statements; advanced 
forms of final statements; statements of affairs and deficiency- 
accounts; realization and liquidation; cost accounts; auditing; 
supplementary exercises are furnished for additional practise. 

Each course 3 hours. 
21 and 22. Industrial History. 

Relation of commerce and industry to geography; commercial 
products; topography, climate and other physical conditions af- 
fecting the commercial progress of the several countries, and 
their productions, industries and commerce; the development of 
manufactures; study of government reports. Each course 3 hours. 
Will not be given in 1917—18. 

23 and 24. Business Organiztion and Management. 

Economic environment; equipment; management; the labor 
force; record of the workers; record of raw material and finished 
and unfinished goods. Each course 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1917—18. 

25 and 26. American Government. 

A study of the organization and workings of American govern- 
ment in all its branches. Lectures, text-book and library read- 
ings. Each course 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1917—18. 

27 and 28. Corporation and Trust Problems. 

The instruments of corporation finance; trading on the equity; 
watered stock; the market and the price; amortization; capitali- 
zation and the state; study of hypothetical cases. 

Each course 2 hours. 
Will not be given in 1917—18. 

DRAWING 
COLLEGE 

11 and 12. Free-Hand Drawing. 

These courses include instruction in drawing, light and shade, 
portrait, landscape, composition, animals, fruits, flowers, etc.; in 
charcoal, crayon, and pencil. Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

13 and 14. Free-Hand Drawing. 

These courses are a continuation of Courses 11 and 12. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 
For advanced courses in Drawing see School of Art. 



32 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

15 and 16. Biological Drawing. 

Exercises in shading and perspective. Diagrammatic drawing. 
Drawings illustrating the construction of the microscope. Micro- 
scopic drawing from mounted slides. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

17 and 18. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering; principles of isometric, cabinet and orthographic 
projections with applications on plane sections and intersections 
of surfaces; sketches and working drawings. 
Required in the Mathematical group. 

Each course 4 hours, 2 credits. 

19 and 20. Descriptive Geometry. 

Theory of orthographic projection; discussion, proof, and 
graphic solution of theoretical and practical problems. 
Prerequisites: Drawing 17 and 18. 

Each course 4 hours, 2 credits. 

ECONOMICS 

See Political Science. 

EDUCATION 
COLLEGE 

11. Psychology. 

See Philosophy 11. 3 hours. 

12. Principles of Teaching. 

Psychological principles of teaching, types of teaching, class- 
room management. Text-book, lectures, collateral reading, re- 
ports. 3 hours. 

13. History of Education. 

Development of educational aims and practises since days of 
Greece, with particular stress on time since Rousseau. 3 hours. 

14. Educational Classics. 

Study of epoch-making writers on education, including Plato, 
Aristotle, Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, 
Spencer. Prerequisite: Course 13. 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1917—18. 

21. Principles of Education. 

Consideration of the bases, aims, content, and values of educa- 
tion. Introduction to philosophy of education. Seminar on cur- 
rent educational problems and movements. 3 hours. 



augustan a college 33 

22. Modern Educational Theories. 

Study of modern writers on education, such as James, Hanus, 
Bagley, Dewey, Butler, Eliot, Home, Adams. Prerequisites: 
Courses 13 and 14. 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1917—18. 

23. Secondary Education. 

The American High School, in regard to its organization, cur- 
riculum, methods of teaching. Comparative study of European 
systems. 4 hours. 

Will not be given in 1917—18. 

24. Educational Administration and Supervision. 

Study of the organization and management of the American 
public school system, in its relation to community as well as to 
educational theory. Educational measurements and surveys. 

4 hours. 

ELOCUTION 
COLLEGE 

11. Principles of Expression. 

A fundamental course in articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, 
principles of grouping, bodily expression and voice culture. 

2 hours, 1 credit. 

12. Public Speaking. 

This course includes the study of the principles of effective 
speaking and the delivery of extemporaneous speeches. 

2 hours, 1 credit. 

13. Literary Interpretation. 

An interpretative study is made of classical and contempor- 
aneous poetry and drama with reference to oral presentation. 
The voice is trained to express both thought and feeling. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11 and 12. 2 hours, 1 credit. 

14. Oratory. 

The course in oratory includes the study and delivery of great 
orations. Each student is required also to present at least one 
original oration. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11, 12 and 13. 2 hours, 1 credit. 

ENGLISH 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Reading: Hawthorne's Tanglewood Tales; Spelling; Practical 
Exercises in sentence writing. Each course 5 hours. 

College Catalog S 



34 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

For those unable to speak and read the English language a 
more elementary course will also be given. The number of hours 
and the character of the instruction in this course will depend 
upon the needs of the students assigned to it. 

ACADEMY 

3. Gbammab. 

Review of the essentials of English grammar; Irving's Sketch 
Book; Selected short stories from other authors. 4 hours. 

4. Elementary Composition. 

Oral and written exercises in Description and Narration. 
Readings: Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; Selections from 
American poets. 5 hours. 

5. Elementary Composition. 

Oral and written exercises in Exposition and Argumentation. 
Readings: Franklin's Autobiogrophy ; Lady of the Lake. Written 
reports on assigned topics. 4 hours. 

6. Historical Etymology and Literature. 

Textbook on Etymology; Analysis of from 500 to 800 Latin, 
Greek, and Anglo-Saxon derivatives with written exercises in 
their use. Readings: Webster's Bunker Hill Orations; Roger de 
Coverly Papers. Written reports on assigned readings. 4 hours. 

7. Composition and Literature. 

Letter writing, Figures of Speech, Poetry and Versification. 
Readings: Two plays of Shakespeare; Vision of Sir Launfal; 
Ancient Mariner. Written reports on assigned topics. 4 hours. 

8. Advanced Course in English Grammar. 

Study of the English sentence; its analysis and structure. Se- 
lections from authors studied with special reference to these 
points. 4 hours. 

9. American Literature. 

History of American Literature. Study of American authors, 
with analyses and written reports on assigned readings. 

4 hours. 

10. History of English Literature. 

Text-book course, supplemented by lectures; written reports on 
assigned readings; two book reports. 4 hours. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 35 

COLLEGE 

11. Composition and Rhetoric. 

Elements of writing — words, sentences, paragraphs, whole 
compositions — are studied. Text book, individual conferences, 
study of literary productions with regard to these elements, and 
frequent themes. 

Required in all groups. 3 hours. 

12. Composition and Rhetoric 

The forms of discourse — description, narration, exposition, 
argumentation and persuasion. Text book, illustrative material, 
daily themes. Qualities of style. 

Required in all groups. 3 hours. 

13. Anglo-Saxon. 

The Phonology and Inflection of Anglo-Saxon will first be stud- 
ied. After a few selective readings in the Anglo-Saxon, Beowulf 
will be taken up and read as far as time will allow. One hour 
per week will be given to composition and rhetoric, continuing 
Course 12. 

Required in the English group. 4 hours. 

14. English Language. 

Selections from Lounsbury's History of the English Language, 
Trench, On the Study of Words, and Bradley's The making of 
English, with especial reference to etymology and historical de- 
velopment of words. Part of this course will continue the com- 
position and rhetoric work. 

Required in the English group. 4 hours. 

15. Argumentation and Debate. 

The theory of argumentation and debating. Study of specimens 

of argumentation, and exercises in brief drawing and debating. 

Elective. 2 hours. 

16. Practical Debating. 

Credit is given for practical work on Intercollegiate teams. 
Elective. 2 hours. 

21. Engttsh Literature. 

Purvey of English poetry from Chaucer to the beginning of 
romanticism. At least one work of Chaucer, Spenser, Shake- 
speare, Dryden, and Pope will be studied. Lectures on the histori- 
cal development of English poetry during this period. 

Required in all groups. 2 hours. 



36 augustana college 

22. English Literature. 

The development of the English essay. Selections from the 
following authors are studied: Addison and Steele, Lamb, De 
Quincey, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Lowell, and Emerson. 
Lectures, tracing the historical development of the essay. 

Required in all groups. 2 hours. 

23. The Romantic Movement. 

Lectures on the history of romanticism. Discussion of the 
forces at work in the romantic movement. Reports on assigned 
topics. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

24. English Fiction. 

Lectures on the history, development, and significance of the 
English novel. Reports on assigned topics. Analysis of typical 
characters in fiction. Use of text-book. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

25. Epic Art. 

Lectures on Epic Art. Study of Milton's Paradise Lost. 
Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

26. Browning and Tennyson. 

Lectures. Critical and interpretative study of selected poems 
of Browning and Tennyson with special reference to the litera- 
ture of the Victorian period. Browning and Tennyson are sepa- 
rate courses, and are given alternate years. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

27. Dramatic Art. 

Lectures on dramatic art. Study of Shakespeare's plays. Anal- 
ysis of characters. Theses on assigned plays. Preparation of 
charts to illustrate the technique of the drama. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

28. Literary Criticism. 

Lectures on the principles and science of criticism. Reports on 
assigned readings. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

29. English Seminar. 

Critical study of English and American masterpieces. Bio- 
graphical and critical theses. Elective. 2 hours. 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 37 

FRENCH 
COLLEGE 

11. Elementaby French. 

Fraser and Squair's Shorter French Course, lessons I — LII; 
irregular verbs ; aural and oral work. Reading begun. 5 hours. 

12. Elementary French. 

Bierman and Frank's Conversational French Reader completed. 
Exercises in composition. Reading of about 250 additional pages 
of easy French. 5 hours. 

13. Second Year French. 

Reading of 250 pages of modern texts; sight readings; trans- 
lation into French. 4 hours. 

14. Second Year French. 

Reading of 150 pages of modern prose; three classical plays; 
exercises in conversation. 4 hours. 

21. Third Year French. 

Matzke's Primer of French Pronunciation. Corneille's he Cid, 
Moliere's Le Misanthrope, Racine's Athalie. 300 pages of modern 
prose. 4 hours. 

22. Third Year French. 

Composition. Vreeland and Michaud's Anthology of French 
Prose and Poetry. 500 pages of modern prose. 4 hours. 

GEOGRAPHY 

PREPARATORY 

1 and 2. Descriptive Geography. Each course 3 hours. 

GEOLOGY 

ACADEMY 
3. Physiography. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book; practical studies con- 
sisting of observations of weather changes and examinations of 
weather maps, study of topographic maps, and of local topog- 
raphy. 4 hours. 

COLLEGE 
21. Meteorology. 

Recitations from text-book; manipulation of meteorological 
instruments; study of cyclones and anticyclones from files of 
daily weather maps ; tabulation of the elements of local weather 
and climate. 4 hours. 



38 augustan a college 

22. Geology. 

Reading of a suitable text-book; lectures on the classification 
and genesis of the more common rocks, and land forms, with 
work in identifying the most common minerals, rocks and fossils; 
two or three field excursions. Desirable as preparation: Ele- 
mentary Zoology. 

Three hours of recitations; one period of two hours of labora- 
tory work. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

GERMAN 
ACADEMY 

7. Elementary Gebman. 

Brief introductory survey of etymology, using Thomas' Prac- 
tical German Grammar. Reading of 150 pages of easy prose, 
with coincident special study of the German verb. Constant 
practise in pronunciation. 5 hours. 

8. Elementary German. 

Reading of 350 pages of easy modern prose. Grammar in close 
connection with reading. Special study of the German noun. 
Translation into German of 30 pages of easy text. 5 hours. 

9. Second Year German. 

Composition. Reading of one play of Schiller. 5 hours. 

10. Second Year German. 

Narrative prose. Modern plays. Colloquial German. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Third Year German. 

A drama of Schiller or Goethe. Modern narrative prose. 

4 hours. 

12. Thtrd Year German. 

Modern narrative prose. Poll's German Prose Composition. 

4 hours. 

13. Fourth Year German. 

German conversation. Discussion of grammatical questions in 
German. Collateral reading of modern prose. 4 hours. 

14. Fourth Year German. 

Classical dramas. History of literature. German essays. Col- 
lateral reading of modern prose. 4 hours. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 39 

GREEK 

COLLEGE 

11. First Year Greek. 

The most essential facts of the language; daily exercises in 
forms; the acquiring of a fair working vocabulary. The amount 
of work done is equivalent to the first fifty lessons in White's 
First Greek Book. 5 hours. 

12. First Year Greek. 

Course 11 continued. One book of the Anabasis carefully 
studied with special reference to mastery of forms and the fun- 
damental constructions. 5 hours. 

13. Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Books II — III of the Anabasis. The elements of Greek syntax 
studied in connection with the reading of the text, together with 
one exercise each week in Greek prose composition. 5 hours. 

14. (1) Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Continuation of course 13. Book IV of the Anabasis. 
(2) Homer. 

Introduction to the Epic dialect and to the Homeric hexameter. 
Books I and II of the Iliad or Odyssey. 5 hours. 

21. Homer. 

Continuation of course 14 (2). Books III — VI of the Iliad or 
their equivalent. 4 hours. 

22. Plato. 

The Apology carefully read, with a rapid reading of as many 
of the minor dialogs as time will permit. 4 hours. 

23. Oratory. 

Representative orations of Lysias and Demosthenes. 2 — 4 hours. 

25. Tragedy. 

Introduction to Greek tragedy, Euripides's Alcestis or Soph- 
ocles's Antigone. Outlines of history of Greek literature with 
special reference to the origin and development of the drama. 

2 — 4 hours. 
27. Hellenistic Greek. 

Critical study of the Greek of this period; rapid reading of 
some of the historical portions of the New Testament or the 
Septuagint and careful study of some of the Pauline epistles. 

2 — 4 hours. 
Note. Courses 23, 25, 27 will be given in alternate years or at 
the option of the class. 



40 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 



24. History. 

Selections from Thucydides and Herodotus. 



2 — 4 hours. 



26. Advanced Course in Tbagedy. 

Rapid reading of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
Euripides. 2 — 4 hours. 

28. Hellenistic Greek. 

Continuation of course 27. 2 — 4 hours. 

Note. Courses 24, 26, 28 will be given in alternate years or 
at the option of the class. 

HISTORY 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Elementary Course in United States. 

Each course 5 hours. 



ACADEMY 
5 and 6. Elementary Course in General History. 

Each course 5 hours. 



10. High School Course in United States History. 



5 hours. 



COLLEGE 

11. History of Eastern Nations and Greece. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

12. Roman History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

13. History of Medieval Europe. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

14. History of Modern Europe. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

15. English History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

16. American History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

21. History of Babylonia, Assyria, and Egypt. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

22. Advanced Course in Greek History.* 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 



3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours. 
3 hours 
3 hours. 



* Not given in 1917—18. 



augustana college 41 

24. Advanced Course in Roman History. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

25. Constitutional History of England. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

26. Constitutional History of the United States. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

LATIN 
ACADEMY 

3. First Year Latin. 

Daily recitations from a text-book . Special emphasis laid on 
forms, vocabularies, essentials of grammar, and correct pro- 
nunciation. 5 hours. 

4. First Year Latin. 

Continuation of Course 3. Reading of connected prose. Vo- 
cabulary of about 500 words. 5 hours. 

5. Caesar. 

Rapid review of forms. Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles. Especial 
attention will be given to vocabularies. Grammar and compo- 
sition. 5 hours. 

6. Caesar. 

Commentaries, four books. Grammar and composition. Read- 
ing at sight; drill in vocabularies; memorizing of brief passages 
of text. Walker's Caesar will be used. 5 hours. 

7. Cicero. 

Two orations of Cicero. Review of forms; vocabularies; exer- 
cises in grammar and composition. Sight reading. 5 hours. 

8. Cicero and Ovid. 

Three orations of Cicero. Reading at sight. Ovid's Metamor- 
phoses, about one thousand lines. Essentials of prosody and 
scansion; grammar and composition continued. 5 hours. 

9. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, two books. Introduction to epic poetry; prosody 
reviewed; scansion of text read; grammar and composition; 
translation at sight. 5 hours. 

10. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, four books. Grammar and composition. Outlines 
of classical mythology. Translation at sight. 5 hours. 



42 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

COLLEGE 

11. Rapid review of essentials of grammar. Selections from Livy or 

other Roman historians. 3 hours. 

12. A selection of Latin verse from Ennius to Boethius. 3 hours. 

Courses 11 and 12 are required in the classical group and as 
prerequisites for the following courses. 

13. Horace. 

Selections from the Epodes; the Odes, two books or equivalent. 
Study of lyric metres. 3 hours. 

14. Tacitus. 

The lesser works or the Histories. 3 hours. 

21. Letters of Cicero. 

Rapid reading course. 2 hours. 

22. Roman Comedy. 

The Rudens and the Trinummus of Plautus. 2 hours. 

23. Latin Composition. 1 hour. 

24. Latin Composition. 

Continuation of course 23. 1 hour. 

Of the college courses outlined above, courses 21 — 24 will not 
be offered during the year 1917 — 18. 

Students desiring a recommendation to teach should complete 
with high standing at least two years of the reading courses out- 
lined above and in addition the year of Latin composition. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE. 
COLLEGE 
12. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work designed to give stu- 
dents systematic instruction in proper use of libraries. Course 
includes work in the following subjects: library methods, classi- 
fication, cataloging; book-binding and care of books; elementary 
book selection; general indexes; elementary reference; public 
documents; note-taking; investigation of a topic in a library; 
bibliography. By problems and other assigned work the student 
is brought in actual contact with the books and methods of the 
library. 3 hours 

LOGIC 

See Philosophy. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 43 

MATHEMATICS 
PREPARATORY 

1. Arithmetic. 

Review of fundamental rules and fractions; compound num- 
bers, including the metric system. 5 hours. 

2. Abithmetic. 

Percentage; interest; ratio and proportion; involution and 
evolution; mensuration. 5 hours. 

ACADEMY 

3. Algebra. 

Fundamental rules, including synthetic division; factoring; 
common factors and multiples. 5 hours. 

4. Algebba. 

Fractions; equations containing fractions; systems of equa- 
tions; graphic solution of equations; involution and evolution; 
logarithms; quadratic equations. 5 hours. 

5. Plane Geometby. 

Rectilinear figures and the circle; ratio and proportion; similar 
figures — three books. 5 hours. 

6. Plane Geometby. 

Areas of polygons and circles; regular polygons and circles — 
two books. 5 hours. 

7. Advanced Algebba. 

Review of quadratic equations, the graph, and logarithms; 
progression; compound interest and annuities; the binominal 
theorem; ratio and proportion; indeterminate equations. 5 hours. 

8. Solid and Sphebical Geometby. 

Lines and planes in space; polyhedrons, cylinders, cones, and 
the sphere. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Tbigonometry and College Algebra. 

Plane Trigonometry and selected chapters from college algebra. 

Prerequisites: One and one-half units of entrance algebra, and 
one unit of plane geometry. Required in the mathematical and 
in the physical science groups. 4 hours. 

12. Analytical Geometry and College Algebra. 

Plane analytic geometry and selected chapters from college 
algebra. 4 hours. 



44 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11. Required in the mathematical 
and in the physical science groups. 

13 and 14. Elementary Analysis. 

Algebra, Trigonometry, and Analytic Geometry. Intended for 
students who offer only one unit of entrance algebra. 

Each course 3 hours. 

15 and 16. College Algebra. 

Courses supplementary to courses 11 and 12. 

Each course 2 hours. 

Prerequisites: One and one-half units of entrance algebra. 

Recommended to all students who take Mathematics 11 and 12. 

17 and 18. Analytic Geometry and Calculus. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11 and 12. Each course 4 hours. 
Required in the mathematical group. 

21. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18 4 hours. 

Required in the mathematical group. 

22. Advanced Calculus. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18, 21. 4 hours. 

Required in the mathematical group. 

Only two of the following courses are offered each term. 

23 and 24. Theory of Equations. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

25 and 26. Modern Geometry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

27 and 28. Differential Equations. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

29 and 30. Analytical Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. 

Each course 2 or 3 hours. 
Spherical and Theoretical Astronomy. 

See Astronomy 23, 24. 

Surveying. 

See Surveying. 

Students in the mathematical group are required to take Mathe- 
matics 23—24, or 25—26, or 27—28. 

METEROLOGY 

See Geology. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 45 

MUSIC 

See Conservatory of Music. 

PEDAGOGY 

See Education. 

PHILOSOPHY 

11. Elementary Psychology. 

Study of text-book. Lectures. Practical applications to the 
principles of teaching and to human life. Required in the Edu- 
cation Group. 3 hours. 

13. Liquor Problem. 

Lectures. Papers and class discussions on various phases of 
alcoholism. 1 hour. 

14. Liquor Problem. 

Continuation of Course 13. 1 hour. 

21. Logic 

Elements of deductive logic. Use of text-book. 2 hours. 

22. Psychology. 

Advanced course in psychology. Lectures. Use of text-book. 
Theses on assigned topics. 3 hours. 

23. Sociology. 

Lectures. Use of text-book. Study of social problems. Theses 
on assigned topics. 2 hours. 

24. Ethics. 

Lectures. Study of text-book. 2 hours. 

25. Esthetics. 

Lectures. Practical exercises in Art analysis. Study of pict- 
ures, statuary, buildings, landscapes, etc. 2 hours. 

26. History of Philosophy. 

General history of philosophy. Use of text-book. Lectures. 

3 hours. 

PHONETICS AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS 
COLLEGE 

21. The Physiology of speech sounds with applications to various lan- 

guages. 2 hours. 

22. General Linguistics. 2 hours. 



46 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

PHYSICS 

For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 

7 and 8. Elementary Physics. 

Three hours each week are given to lectures or recitations, and 
two periods, two hours each, to laboratory work. In the class- 
room the work consists in lecture demonstrations and recitations 
from a text-book. In the laboratory a course of experiments, 
parallel to the work in the class-room, is performed and reported 
under the supervision of an instructor. About 85 experiments 
are performed and reported in writing by each student during 
the year. The first term covers Mechanics and Heat; the second, 
Electricity, Sound, and Light. The course is intended to give a 
general knowledge of the subject and to prepare for more ad- 
vanced work. Each course 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

COLLEGE 

21. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat. 

Prerequisites: Physics 7 and 8. The course consists in a series 
of precision measurements, the theory of each experiment being 
fully developed in the class-room. A knowledge of Trigonometry 
is required for this course. Two hours of lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

22. Electricity, Sound and Light. 

This course is a continuation of Course 21. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

23. Problems in Physics. 

One hour per week is given to problem work in Physics. The 
course is designed to accompany Course 21. 1 credit. 

24. Problems in Physics. 

Similar to 23. 1 credit. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY 

See Geology. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

See Biology. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 47 

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS 
ACADEMY 
9. Civil Government. 

The first half of the course is devoted to the study of the 
Constitution of the United States, the second half to local and 
state government. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

21. Money and Banking. 

The first part of this course consists of a study of Money and 
Credit. The second part includes a study of the Principles of 
Banking, Banking in the U. S. and Foreign Banking Systems. 
Each student is required to prepare and read a paper on some 
topic in the course. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

22. Political Economy. 

The first part of the course is devoted to the principles of 
Political Economy, and the second part to the discussion of the 
questions relating to the practical application of these principles. 
Each student is required to prepare a paper on some economic 
subject. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

See Philosophy. 

SURVEYING 
COLLEGE 
12. Surveying. 

An elementary course in land surveying; use of tape, compass, 
level, transit, and solar attachment. Recitations, field work, and 
drawing. Usually four hours of field work and drawing. 2 credits. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 11 and 12 or 13 and 14, and Draw- 
ing 15 and 16. 

SWEDISH 

ACADEMY 

5. First Year Swedish. 

Elements of Grammar, using Vikner's Swedish Grammar. 
Special study of nouns and verbs. Particular stress on principal 
parts of verbs, plural forms and genders of nouns and comparison 
of adjectives; composition. Reading of 250 pages of prose. 

4 hours. 

6. First Year Swedish. 

Study of grammar continued. Composition. Exercises in 
Orthography. Reading of 250 pages of prose. 4 hours. 



48 augustaxa college 

10. Second Yeae Swedish. 

Study of the Swedish sentence; its analysis and structure. 
Punctuation. Review of etymology. Exercises in Orthography. 
Themes. Reading of at least 500 pages of modern prose and 
poetry. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Swedish Gbammar. 

The same as courses 5, 6 and 10. These courses are intended 
especially for those who enter College without having studied 
Swedish. To those who have taken Swedish in the Academy 
they also furnish an opportunity to review the subject of Gram- 
mar. Each course 3 hours. 

13. SVEN8K HlSTOBIA. 

Sverges historia fran aldsta tider till 1611. Sarskild vikt lag- 
ges pa studiet av de fyra standens uppkomst och utveckling, de 
inbordes striderna mellan svenska partiet och unionspartiet, 
seder och bruk i folkets dagliga liv samt Gustav Vasas regering. 

3 hours. 

14. SVEXSK HISTORIA. 

Sverges historia fran 1611 till narvarande tid. Sarskild upp- 
marksamhet agnas at studiet av Sverges inre utveckling under 
1600 och 1700-talen samt av dess insats i varldshistorien under 
Gustav II Adolf och Karl XII. Mera grundligt studeras ocks§, 
den politiska, sociala och ekonomiska utvecklingen under det 
senaste halvseklet. 3 hours. 

21. Sttlistik. 

Dispositionsovningar. Stillara med sarskild uppmarksamhet 
fast vid de olika stilarternas uppkomst och nuvarande anvand- 
ning. Studium av sprakriktighetsreglerna. 3 hours. 

22. Temaskbiyznlxg. 

Denna kurs, som ar baserad pa kursen i stilistik, omfattar 
skrivning av temata och uppsatser, ovningar i brevskrivning och 
i journalistisk stil samt skrivna oversattningar frin engelska 
till svenska med sarskild vikt lagd vid idiomatiska uttrycks kor- 
rekta atergivande. 3 hours. 

23. Svenska LiTTERArcBENs Hlstoria. 

Historisk framstallning av den svenska litteraturen fran folk- 
vandringstiden till 1809. Warburgs larobok i svensk litteratur- 
historia foljes, men huvudsakligen meddelas undervisningen ge- 
nom forelasningar. Prov pa de olika forfattarnas diktkonst 
studeras. rikligare ju narmare var egen tid. 4 hours. 



AT7GTJSTANA COLLEGE 49 

24. SVENSKA LlTTEBATURENS HlSTOEIA. 

Fortsattning av foregaende kurs. Sarskilt studium agnas at 
Tegner's lyriska dikter och Fritiofs saga, Atterbom's Lycksalig- 
hetens 6, Runebergs episka dikter och Fdnrik Stals sagner samt 
at var egen tids forfattare: Viktor Rydberg, Strindberg, Froding, 
Selma Lagerlof, Heidenstam och Karlfelt. 4 hours. 

25. Dan ska. 

Studium av danska spraket och litteraturen i huvudsakligt 
syfte att skickliggora den studerande att lasa och forsta danskt 
sprak samt gora honom i nagon man bekant med Danmarks lit- 
teratur. I regel genomgas en av Holbergs komedier, ett drama 
av Oehlenschlager samt ett arbete av nagon modern forfattare. 

2 hours. 

26. Nobska. 

Denna kurs ar av samma art som den foregaende i danska. Ett 
eller tva skadespel av Ibsen samt nagra av Bjornsons Fortaellinger 
genomgas. 2 hours. 

ZOOLOGY 

See Biology. 



College Catalog h 



50 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 



GRADUATION 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Board of Direc- 
tors on such persons as have satisfactorily completed all the prescribed 
work, as well as the required amount of elective work, in any of the 
ten groups of the College curriculum, in all 120 credits, to which must 
be added the required credits in gymnastics. A diploma fee of five 
dollars is charged. 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 



The requirements of the Illinois Teachers' Certificating law for second 
grade certificates, first grade certificates, high school teachers' certifi- 
cates, special certificates, and supervisory certificates may be met by 
taking courses offered in Augustana College. The provisions of the 
law applying to students of this institution are as follows: 
I. County Certificates. 

1) One year of work will be accepted as the equivalent of the junior 
year's work in a normal school in granting of a second grade county 
certificate, provided the credits in the following table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours. 

Education (Educational Psychology, History 

of Education, School Administration or 

Principles and Methods of Teaching) ... 6 semester hours. 
Electives 6 semester hours. 

Total 30 semester hours. 

2) Two years of work will be accepted as the equivalent of a normal 
school graduation in the granting of a first grade county certificate, pro- 
vided the credits in the following table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours. 

Education (Educational Psychology, History 

of Education, School Administration or 

Principles and Methods of Teaching) .. .6 semester hours. 

Practice Teaching 6 semester hours. 

Electives 30 semester hours. 

Total 60 semester hours. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 51 

3) A high school teachers' certificate may be issued without exam- 
ination to a graduate of Augustana College provided the applicant offers 
within three years after graduation certified credits, accompanied by 
faculty recommendation of ability to teach in the high school and shows 
credit for at least three semester hours each of Educational Psychology 
and Principles and Methods of Teaching. 

4) Two years of work will admit a candidate to the examination for 
a county high school certificate, provided the credits have been certified 
by the president and registrar. 

5). Two years of work will admit the candidate to the examination 
for a county supervisory certificate, provided the credits in the follow- 
ing table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics 6 semester hours. 

History of Education 3 semester hours. 

Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

Educational Psychology 3 semester hours. 

Principles and Methods of Teaching 3 semester hours. 

Electives 33 semester hours. 

Total 60 semester hours. 

The completion of 15 units of secondary work alone in a recognized 
high school or academy is the entrance requirement for each of the 
above outlined courses. 
II. State Certificates. 

a) Four-year Certificates. 

Graduates of Augustana College will be admitted to the State exam- 
ination as follows: 

1) For a four-year elementary school certificate, provided the appli- 
cant has had three years' successful teaching, two of which shall have 
been in the elementary schools of Illinois, on a first grade county certifi- 
cate. 

2) For a four-year high school certificate, provided the applicant 
has had three years' successful teaching, two of which shall have been 
in Illinois, on a first grade, high school or supervisory county certificate. 

3) For a four-year supervisory certificate, provided the applicant has 
had three years' successful supervision, two of which shall have been in 
Illinois, on a county supervisory certificate. 

b) Life Certificates. 

At the time of its expiration any four-year State certificate shall, 
upon evidence of successful teaching or supervision satisfactory to the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, become valid and endorsed for 
life. 



AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE 

POSTGRADUATE COURSES 



The offering of graduate courses is henceforth optional with the 
heads of the respective college departments. 

Courses of study leading to the degree of Master of Arts are subject 
to the following conditions: 

1) Only persons who have received a Bachelor's degree from this 
institution or one of equal rank, and who sustain a good moral charac- 
ter, are eligible candidates. 

2) In average cases it is expected that two years' time will be re- 
quired to complete the course. 

3) Resident study at or within easy reach of the institution is, as a 
rule, insisted upon. 

4) Professional studies are not accepted for the Master's degree. 

5) The subjects pursued shall be a major and a minor, together with 
a thesis on some subject in connection with the major study. The 
amount of work required in the major and minor shall be equivalent to 
one year of ordinary academic work, the work on the thesis being addi- 
tional to this. The estimated proportion is: the major 20 points, the 
minor 10 points, the thesis 15 points. These courses are under the 
immediate direction of a committee of the faculty, consisting of the 
professors in charge of the departments to which the subjects chosen 
belong. 

6) The candidate is required to present himself at the College, for 
final examination, at least one week before Commencement. The exam- 
ination may be taken in instalments at the discretion of the professor 
in charge of the department. 

7) The candidate must submit his thesis to the faculty by the first 
of May prior to his graduation, the theme having been reported to the 
faculty for approval at least six months before the presentation of the 
thesis. This thesis, which is to disclose as much original research as 
possible, may be publicly read and defended by the author at a time 
and place appointed for that purpose. It shall be carefully examined 
by each professor under whom the candidate shall have pursued his 
studies, and upon recommendation of this committee shall be accepted 
or rejected by the faculty. At least two bound copies of the thesis, 
which must be typewritten or printed, shall be deposited in the College 
Library. 

8) Applicants are limited in their choice of subjects to those branches 
of study for which instruction is provided in the several established 
Collegiate departments. 

9) A fee of sixty dollars is charged, of which fifty dollars must be 
paid at the time of registration, and ten dollars at the time of grad- 
uation. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 53 

10) Each candidate shall report progress to the Secretary of the 
faculty not later than the first of February of each year. 

For further information, apply to the Enrolling Officer or to the 
heads of the departments concerned. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



Students entering a class at any time subsequent to the first hour of 
a term in that subject will be reported absent by the instructor, and 
must account for all the hours lost by such delay in entering. While 
new students may be received at any time, they will find it very much 
to their interest to be on hand on Registration day, as work in all 
classes begins promptly the first day of the term. 

All students are required to attend divine service at least once every 
Sunday; and also the daily Chapel exercises, unless excused by the 
President. 

Certificates of standing are given at the end of each term. 

The standing of students in each subject is marked on a scale of 100, 
the minimum limit for passing in each subject being 60, and the aver- 
age 80. 

Mid-term reports concerning the progress in study of the younger 
students are sent to their parents or guardians. Also in the case of 
older students on request, or when the faculty deems such reports 
desirable. 

Any student whose standing and progress in any subject are not 
satisfactory to the teacher may be dropped at any time during the term. 

Attendance upon instruction in the undergraduate courses is re- 
quired. Deviations from this rule are allowed only under exceptional 
circumstances. Should any student wish to earn credits by private 
work and examination, he must submit a petition to this effect to the 
faculty thru the enrolling officer. The faculty will not, however, grant 
any such petition unless it be accompanied by the recommendation of 
the professor in charge of the department concerned, and unless the 
petitioner has earned an average standing of at least 85 for the term 
last preceding. The minimum grade for approval in the examination 
is also 85 per cent. i 

Professional men who have not completed the College course but 
desire to do so by non-resident study are generally accorded this priv- 
ilege, but at least one year of resident study is required for the degree 
of A. B. 

Resident study on the part of seniors turnout the year is, as a rule, 
required. 



54 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The Theological Seminary 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDRBEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. O. 

President. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D. D., R. N. O., 

Professor Emeritus. 

Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D.D., LL.D., R.N.O., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Hermeneutics, Liturgies, Apologetics and Church PoHty. 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, Old Testament Introduction, and Evangelistics. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES S5DERGREN, A.M., 

Professor of New Testament Exegesis, New Testament Introduction, Homiletics and 

Philosophy. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Professor of Church History, Symbolies, Biblical Theology, Pastoral Theology, Propedeutics, 

and Hymnology. 



ADMISSION AND MATRICULATION 

The Theological Seminary prepares students for the ministry of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, with the special needs of the Augustana 
Synod in view. And the faithful and efficient service of the Synod 
requires that its pastors receive their training at its own Seminary. 
The spirit of loyalty, solidarity and devotedness, knowledge of import- 
ant detail, interest in the work and faith in the mission of the Synod 
are necessary qualifications with which the Seminary aims to equip 
and imbue its candidates for the ministry. A full classical course is 
regarded as constituting a normal preparation for the Seminary. The 
rule, therefore, is that all candidates for admission as regular students 
in the Seminary must be graduates of a recognized College, the courses 
of which must have included: Swedish, English, German, Latin and 
Greek according to the following requirements: 

1. Swedish: For candidates who intend to serve Swedish congrega- 
tions all required courses in Academy and College according to Clas- 
sical Course B. Candidates for English work are excused from College 
Swedish. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 55 

2. English: a) For candidates who intend to serve Swedish congre- 
gations all required courses in Academy and College according to 
Classical Course B, or an equivalent 

b) For candidates in exclusively English work all required courses 
in Academy and College according to Classical Course A. 

3. German: Two years German. 

4. Latin: Two years Latin. 

5. Greek: Two years Greek. 

All applications for admission to the Seminary should be presented 
before the first day of September, or if possible by the first of June, 
of the school year; all such applications to be sent to the President 
or to the Secretary of the Faculty, Prof. C. J. Sodergren, 1010—38 st, 
Rock Island, 111. 

Each applicant who is a graduate of any of the colleges of the Synod 
will present to the Matriculation Committee, consisting of the Theolo- 
gical Faculty and the President of the Synod, the following documents: 

1. A formal application for admission to the Seminary. 

2. A brief biography and explicit statement of the motives which 
induce him to devote his life to the ministry of the gospel. 

3. A certificate of graduation. 

4. A statement of all the College credits. 

5. Satisfactory testimonials from the authorities of the institution 
previously attended as to the candidate's Christian character and 
practical ability, and 

6. Certificate of membership in a Lutheran church, together with 
recommendations from the pastor of the applicant. 

Students from other colleges must furnish statements of equivalent 
value and character. 

The committee on matriculation will hold a colloquium with the new 
applicants during the first week of the scholastic year, in the third 
week in September. // the students arrive later, they cannot be matric- 
ulated before the beginning of the following scholastic year. 

Each course of study extends thru one full year or more. 

COURSES 

The whole plan of instruction is divided into twenty-one distinct 
courses as specified in the catalog. The classes have from one to five 
lectures and recitations a week in each course. The courses cover all 
the important subjects taught in the best theological seminaries of our 
Church and aim to equip students properly for the ministry. The 
student must pass oral or written examinations in these twenty-one 
courses to become a graduate of the Seminary. 

Altho several of the courses are elective as to order, the students 
are recommended to study according to the following plan: Junior 



56 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

year: I, II, HI, IV, V, VI, VII, XIa; Middle year: Villa, IXa, X, Xlb, 
XHIa, XIV, XVIIa, XVIII; Senior year: XIc, XII, XHIb, XV, XVI, 
XVIIb, XIX, XX. 

No student is allowed to enter the Senior class unless he has passed 
satisfactory examinations in the preceding courses. 

The peculiar plan of this Institution forbids the admission ad eundem 
gradum of students who have taken part of a course at other semina- 
ries or universities. But a student, in addition to the courses which he 
has selected, may offer for examination whatever subject he has previ- 
ously mastered. No one, however, can be granted the B. D. degree 
unless he has been a regular resident student for the number of years 
the regulations and courses require. As a rule, all students should 
take a full three years' course at this seminary. 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity, B. D., is the standard of gradu- 
ation from our Seminary and this degree is granted to all regular 
students who are Bachelors of Arts, and who with decided credit have 
completed all the courses of the Seminary, presented the thesis as 
required, 1 ) and been duly approved by the professors in charge of the 
subject and by the Faculty. 

Graduates with the S. M. degree may later receive the B. D. degree if 
by examinations in all subjects required, they raise their testimonials 
according to preceding conditions and write the thesis. 

In order to give time for review no final examinations are held with 
the Junior and Middle classes before May 15. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 
I. THEOLOGICAL PROPEDEUTICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course gives a general survey of all the theological sciences. 
Philip Schaff's Theological Propedeutic is used as a text-book and 
Heinrici's Encyklopadie as reference book. 

II. PHILOSOPHY 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

This course embraces Introduction to Philosophy, History of Philo- 
sophy, and Philosophy of Religion. The instruction is given by lectures 
based upon outlines and textbooks and by assignments and seminar 
work. In the Junior year Introduction to Philosophy is offered during 
the Fall term and History of Philosophy during the Spring term; the 
Philosophy of Religion is presented in the Middle year. 

*) Candidates for the B. D. degree should select their subjects for the thesis and have 
them approved by the Faculty during the Spring term of the Middle year, and be ready to 
submit the thesis not later than February 1st of the Senior year. The subject may be 
chosen from the Exegetical, the Historical, or the Systematic departments. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINAEY 57 

Text-books and Books of Reference: Jerusalem's Introduction to Phi- 
losophy; Ladd's Philosophy of Religion; Thilly's History of Philosophy, 
and Pontus Wikner's Filosofiens historia, utgifven af S. G. Youngert. 

III. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PBOFESSOB LINDBEBG 

This subject is offered during the Junior year and embraces intro- 
duction to Dogmatics, Ethics, and Apologetics. Instruction is given 
by recitations and lectures. Students are required either to present 
written answers to questions in the text-book or a typewritten essay 
on some of the more important topics. 

Text-Book: Weidner's Introduction to Dogmatic Theology. 

Books of Reference: Introductions in standard works of Systematic 
Theoiogy. 

IV. ELEMENTARY HEBREW 3 hours. 

The work in Hebrew during the Junior year covers fifty lessons in 
Harper's Method and Manuel and Elements of the Hebrew Grammar. 
Additional chapters in Genesis are translated. A working vocabulary 
is memorized. A written examination is required on the Hebrew 
paradigms and some selected passage for translation. 

The text-books used are Harper's Hebrew Method and Manual, 
Harper's Elements of Hebrew, Kittel's Hebrew Bible, and some stand- 
ard Hebrew Dictionary. 

V. GREEK JUNIOR 2 hours. 

PBOFESSOB SODEBGBEN 

The regular studies in this department embrace the reading and 
explication of the Gospels and the Acts. A written examination is re- 
quired on such parts of these books as the professor may assign. The 
N. T. Syntax is reviewed in lectures and notes. 

The text of Nestle (or Westcott-Hort) is used. 

EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY 
VI. BIBLICAL INTRODUCTION 

a) Old Testament 1 hour. 

PBOFESSOB BLOMGBEN 

The General Introduction to the Old Testament embraces the subjects 
of the canon, the original languages of Scripture, textual criticism, and 
principles of Scriptural interpretation. The Special Introduction deals 
with the authorship, integrity, design and structure of the individual 
books of the Bible; it also takes account of the contents and critical 
problems of each book. 



58 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Text-book: A short Introduction to the Old Testament by F. Ernest 
Spencer. 

Besides the class room instruction students prepare papers on topics 
assigned by the professor, and these papers are read and discussed in 
the class. 

b) History of Israel 1 hour. 

This course is given by lectures, which the students copy. Discussions 
of important historical data take place in the class at most of the lect- 
ures given. The Mosaic era has been studied during 1916 — 1917. 

New Testament 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Lectures on the philological and historical apparatus for New Testa- 
ment exegesis and text-criticism, and on the canon of the New Testa- 
ment, using Hammond's Textual Criticism; M'Clymont's The New 
Testament and Its Writers (8vo ed.) ; Zahn's Introduction to the New 
Testament and Gregory's Canon and Text of the New Testament. 

VII. HERMENEUTICS, THEORETICAL AND PRACTICAL 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LLNDBERG 

In this course, offered during the Junior year, the principles of the 
interpretation of the Bible are taught and applied. Lectures are de- 
livered on theory and also on the application by illustrations in Exe- 
gesis. Each student is required to write an essay to prove his ability 
in applying the principles and this essay is also discussed and criticized 
in the class-room. 

Text-Books: Hermeneutics by J. E. Cellerier or Outlines in vol. I of 
Weidner's Theological Encyclopedia; Notes on the Parables by Trench; 
The Miracles of our Lord by Laidlaw. 

Books of Reference: Standard Commentaries. 

VIII. ADVANCED HEBREW 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

a. Middle Year. 

Several historical books are read during the year, besides some 
psalms and some of the minor prophets. The word lists are reviewed 
as well as the main parts of the Hebrew grammar. A final examina- 
tion is required on the wordlists and on translation of some assigned 
Hebrew text. 

b. Senior Year. 

The Senior year is not a language course, but a course in Old Testa- 
ment Exegesis, when one of the major prophets or Deuteronomy is 
studied exegetically. All the principles of Hermeneutics are applied 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINAEY 59 

to the Hebrew text, and all the doctrinal and critical points involved 
are carefully and thoroly discussed. 

A written examination is required at the end of the course. During 
1916 — 1917 Isaiah has been studied. 

IX. GREEK MIDDLE AND SENIOR, AND NEW TESTAMENT 

EXEGESIS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

This division embraces the reading and explication of the Greek 
Testament from Acts to Revelation with Boise's, Weiss's or similar 
notes on the Pauline Epistles. Written examinations are required and 
exegetical notes on some portion of the New Testament may be present- 
ed by the student in proof of scholarship. 

X. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course has this year been a Seminar on salient Biblical Theolo- 
gical themes as: Essence of Christianity, Law and Gospel, Repentance, 
and the like. 

XI. CHURCH HISTORY 6 hours. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

The entire Church History is offered during the three years, Kurtz's 
Church History being the chief text-book, other reference work sug- 
gested in the courses of study, according to the changing needs. Stud- 
ents pass examinations in the course. 

In the third year a general survey of the 19 — 20 century is taken, 
and then the remainder of the year is a full Church History Seminar 
on central issues and personalities of the Period. 

XII. SYMBOLICS AND CONFESSIONS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

A careful study of the text-books is required. A course of lectures 
is also given by the professor on the Confession of the Reformed 
Churches and Sects in America. Examinations must be offered. 

Text-Books: Forsander's Den Oforandrade Augsburgiska bekannelsen; 
Bensow's Larobok i Symbolik; Concordia Pia (The Edition of the 
Augustana Synod). 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 
XIII. DOGMATICS AND HISTORY OF DOGMAS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Middle and Senior years, but the 
beginning of the course is introduced during the Junior year. 



60 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Course A: Recitations and lectures cover Theology, Anthropology 
and Christology and also the corresponding course in the History of 
Dogmas. 

Course B: Necessary repetitions. Recitations and lectures cover 
Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology and also the 
corresponding course in the History of Dogmas. 

Text-Books: Lindberg's Dogmatik and Dogmhistoria ; Schmid's Doc 
trinal Theology or Jacob's A Summary of the Christian Faith. 

Books of Reference: Philippi's Glaubenslehre; Hagenbach's History 
of Dogmas, Seeberg's History of Doctrines; Fisher's History of Doc- 
trine; Krauth's Conservative Reformation. 

XIV. ETHICS AND SOCIOLOGY 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Middle year and covers Theoretical, 
Practical and Sociological Ethics. Theoretical Ethics is studied by rec- 
itations and lectures, and Practical Ethics, including Christian Sociol- 
ogy, by lectures based on a dictated outline. 

Text-Books: Martensen's Christian Ethics; A dictated Outline in 
Practical Ethics and Christian Sociology. 

Books of Reference and Collateral Reading: Luthardt: "History of 
Christian Ethics," "Kompendium der Teologischen Etik;" Dorner: 
"System of Christian Ethics;" Granfelt: "Den Kristliga Sedelaran;" 
Keyser: "A System of Christian Ethics;" Paulsen: "A System of 
Ethics;" Hayes: Introduction to the Study of Sociology." 

XV. APOLOGETICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This course or discipline aims at presenting as complete a system of 
Christian Apologetics as possible. The course is offered during the 
Senior year and given principally by lectures and partly by recitations, 
based on the text in the text-book which, altho rendered in a concise 
form, covers as fully as necessary besides Introduction: Theological, 
Anthropological, Soteriological, Pneumatological and Eschatological 
Apologetics. The students are required to write a Thesis on a subject 
approved by the professor. 

Text-Book: Lindberg's Apologetics, A System of Christian Evidence. 
For books of reference and collateral reading see Bibliography in the 
Text-book. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 

XVI. CATECHETICS, EVANGELISTICS, AND DIACONICS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

In this department special lectures are delivered on the respective 
branches and the prescribed text-books are studied for examination in 
the class. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 61 

XVII. HOMILETICS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Senior Year 
Fry's text-book on Homilectics is used as an outline, with lectures on 
the fundamental principles of preaching and practical exercises in the 
English language. The Senior Year is devoted mainly to class preach- 
ing and practical exercises in the Swedish language. 

XVIII. LITURGICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

Liturgies is studied during the Middle year. Instruction is given by 
recitations and lectures. The students are also trained in correct read- 
ing of the liturgy. A professor in the Conservatory instructs in the 
rendering of the musical parts or chanting. 

Text-Book: Ullman's Liturgik. 

XIX. CHURCH POLITY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Senior year. The course is both 
theoretical and practical, including also instruction in correct keeping 
of Church Records. Written answers to questions based on text-books 
and lectures are required. 

Text-Book: Holmstrom's Kyrkorattslara och Lindberg's Syllabus i 
Kyrkorattslara. 

XX. PASTORAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

Pastoral Theology is studied by Norrby's "Laran om Sjalavarden" 
with close attention to both principles and practice, and with the needs 
of our Lutheran Church in America in full view. Examinations on text- 
book and lectures. 

XXI. CHURCH MUSIC ANR HYMNOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course of lectures aims to give an intelligent grasp of hymning 
and church music as factors of church worship, and on methods of 
obtaining best results. Notes on lectures basis of examination. 



In addition to the above courses theoretical and practical instruction 
is given by the Musical Director in the History of Church Music, the 
Organ and the Choir in the Sanctuary, and the Intoning of the Service. 
Also in Public Speaking by the Teacher of Elocution. These additional 
courses are required and due credit is given. 



62 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



POSTGRADUATE COURSES 
For those who wish to continue their theological studies the follow- 
ing courses leading to the degree of candidatus sacrce theologice, C. S. T., 
have been arranged. 



No. 



I. INTRODUCTORY 
1. Theological Encyclopedia 



PKOFESSOB HTJLT 

Minor. Study of the inner organization of the Theological Sciences, 
classification of the various departments, the principles and 
methods of the various departments, the principles and methods 
of its disciplines and investigation in regard to its select lit- 
erature. 

No. 2. Introduction to the Study of the Fundamentals of Religion. 

PEOFESSOB SODEBGBEN 

Minor 1. The History of Religion: 

a) Origin, universality, development, differentiation and 
criticism of religious values. 

b) The History of some special religion. 
Minor 2. Comparative Religion: 

a) A general survey of the entire field. 

b) Principles of the Science. Its speculative and practical 
value. 

c) Special study of some single religion, such as those of 
India, China, Egypt, the early Semites, Islam, Animism. 

d) A comparison between related or contiguous religions, 
such as those of Babylonia and the early Hebrews, the 
Romans and the Teutons, Israel and Christianity. 

Minor 3. The Psychology of Religion: 

a) Biblical Psychology. 

b) Analysis of Religious Experience. 
Minor 4. The Philosophy of Religion: 

a) Principles, Problems, and Results. 

b) The Religious Aspect of Philosophy. 

c) Monism and Dualism. 

d) The Philosophy of Theism. 



Major 1. 



II. EXEGETICAL THEOLOGY 

PEOFESSOB BLOMGBEN 

No. 3. Old Testament Study and Exegesis. 
The history of Israel and the Jews, from the earliest times 
to 135 A. D. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



63 



Major 2. 



Major 3. 

Minor 1. 
Minor 2. 

Major 4. 



Minor 3. 



An historical survey of the ancient History of Western Asia, 
with special references to the extra-Biblical sources for 
Hebrew and Jewish History. 

Introduction to the Old Testament, its Canon, Interpreta- 
tion, Criticism and Versions. 
The Old Testament Religion. 

Semitic Art and Archeology in their bearing upon the study 
of the Bible. 
Hebrew Exegesis — Exegetical and Critical Study of either: 

a) Course: Deuteronomy, Isaiah and Daniel, or 

b) Course: Exodus, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel, or 

c) Course: The twelve Minor Prophets, the Psalms and Job. 
Special Elementary Courses in Assyrian, Arabic, Syriac, and 
Biblical Aramaic. 



No. 4. New Testament Greek and Exegesis. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Introduction to the New Testament. 
Major 1. Canon, Text, and Versions. 
Minor 1. The need of a new English Version. 
Minor 2. A critical study of the latest Swedish Version. 
Major 2. Peculiarities of the New Testament Greek. 
Minor 3. The Uses of the Aorist, the Participle, or the Subjunctive 

Mode. 
Minor 4. Synonyms and Word Studies. 
Minor 5. Patristic Greek, as exemplified by one of the early Church 

Fathers. 
Minor 6. History of the New Testament Times. 
Minor 7. Epochs in the Life of Jesus or the Life of Paul. 
Major 3. Greek Exegesis: Critical and Exegetical study of, e. g., 

a) The Synoptic Gospels or the Acts, 

b) The Gospel of John, 

c) The Letter to the Romans, 

d) The Letter to the Hebrews. 

e) The Apocalypse. 



III. HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR HULT 

No. 5. Church History 
Major 1. History of the Christian Church from its foundation to the 

Middle Ages. 
Major 2. History of the Christian Church during the Middle Ages and 

the Reformation. 



64 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



Major 3. History of the Christian Church from the seventeenth cen- 
tury to the present time. 

Major 4. The History of the Church in the United States. 

Minor 1. The Apostolic Age. 

Minor 2. Patristics or a more detailed study of some Church Father. 

Minor 3. The Reformation Period. 

Minor 4. History of the Scandinavian Churches. 

Minor 5. History of the Church in the Nineteenth Century. 

No. 6. Symbolics and Confessions 
Major. Symbolics and Confessions in general and their importance. 
Minor 1. History and analysis of the Lutheran Confessions. 
Minor 2. History and analysis of the Reformed Churches. 



Major 1. 



Major 2. 



Major 3. 



Minor 1. 



Minor 2. 



Major 1. 



IV. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

PBOFESSOB LINDBEBO 

No. 7. Dogmatics and Histoby of Dogmas 
Study of three complete Lutheran systems. Selections may 
be made from systems written in Latin, English, German or 
Swedish. 

Study of three complete non-Lutheran works. Selections may 
be made from systems written in English or German. If 
desirable one Lutheran work may be substituted for a non- 
Lutheran work. 

Research work in one department of dogmatics, the selection 
to be made from one of the seven main divisions: Theology, 
Anthropology, Christology, Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ec- 
clesiology and Eschatology. Or instead of one main division 
a special topic in any division may be chosen, scholarly re- 
search work to be proved by a treatise or thesis on the sub- 
ject selected. 

Study of a complete course of History of Dogmas, covering 
all the periods and leading doctrines. In the selection of 
works language will be optional. 

Research work in one of the main periods, covering the 
development of the leading doctrines in such a period. Or 
the student may select one leading doctrine and follow its 
development through all the periods. 

No. 8. Ethics and Sociology. 
Study of the History of Ethics, two systems of Christian 
Ethics, and as a comparative course one system of Moral 
Philosophy. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



65 



Major 2. Study of Social Ethics, Christian Sociology and as a com- 
parative study History of Socialism and Socialism as a 
Science. 

Major 3. Special research work in the field of Social Ethics and So- 
ciology, the result to be presented in a treatise or thesis. 

Minor 1. A thoro study of one ethical system and the special develop- 
ment of some division to prove special research work. 

Minor 2. Special study and research work in some field of Sociology 
such as History of Sociology, Social Service, Social Control, 
Economics, Social Pathology, Socialism, etc., or the treat- 
ment of some practical work in social service. 

No. 9. Apologetics and Polemics. 
Major 1. History of Apologetics and study of at least one of the 
larger works so as to cover all the main questions in the 
apologetical science. 

Major 2. A detailed study of some main division or subject, the result 
of such study to be proved by a treatise or thesis. 
Assistance will be given in selection of suitable subjects. 

Minor 1. The study of the Evidence of Christian experience as pre- 
sented by some of the leading authors with a written syn- 
opsis on some leading work. 

Minor 2. The study of the science of Polemics in general, its history 
and methods, or special heresies in churches and religious 
societies may be selected and arguments presented against 
errors and misapprehension of principal doctrines. In this 
course the relation of Polemics and Irenics may be studied, 
the vindication of the true unity and the disparagement of 
unionism in theory and practise. 

V. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
No. 10. Catechetics and Evangelistics. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

Minor 1. The History of Religious Education. 

Minor 2. A study of the Child; Indoctrination; Formation of Chris- 
tian Character; the relation of the Family, the Church, and 
the State to Religious Education. 

Minor 3. Methods and Means; the Catechism; the Sunday-school; 

Confirmation; Bible Classes; Literature. 
Minor 4. History of Foreign Missions. 



College Catalog 5 



66 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Minor 5. Principles, Methods, and Present State of Foreign Missions. 

Minor 6. Foreign Missions in some special Country or Field. 

Minor 7. The Foreign Missions of the Lutheran Church. 

Minor 8. Home and Inner Missions of the Lutheran Church. 

No. 11. Homiletics. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Minor 1. History and Fundamental Principles of Homiletics. 

Minor 2. The several types of Sermons, Preparation and Delivery. 
Modern Problems connected with the presentation of Chris- 
tian truth. 

NO. 12. LlTURGICS AND CHRISTIAN ART. 
PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

Minor 1. The study of complete works in Liturgies and Christian Art, 
covering all the main topics. 

Minor 2. Special research work in at least two leading subjects in 
Liturgies and Christian Art such as the following subjects: 
The Ancient Liturgies, the Church Year, The Main Elements 
in Worship, The Order of Public Worship, Hymnology, Mu- 
sic, Architecture, Christian Symbolism, Church furniture, etc. 

Minor 3. Special treatment of one leading topic in Liturgies. Such 
treatment should be as complete as possible and presented 
in written form. 

Minor 4. Special treatment of one main topic in Christian Art which 
must be as complete as possible and presented in written 
form. 



No. 13. Church Polity. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

Minor 1. The study of the science of church Polity, covering its his- 
tory, theories and leading forms of church government. 

Minor 2. Special research work in certain fields, such as the Roman 
Catholic, Lutheran and Reformed, or the leading church 
polities in any of the denominations in the Reformed Church. 

Minor 3. Comparative study of leading ideas as expressed in the 
Episcopal, Territorial, Collegiate, Presbyterian and Congre- 
gational system. 

Minor 4. The church polity of the Lutheran Church in the United 
States and special treatment of some practical issues. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 67 

No. 14. Pastoral Theology. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

Minor. The minister's life and pastoral activity, pastoral calls and care 
of souls, synodical and parish problems. 



REGULATIONS AND DEGREES 

A postgraduate student who has completed seven of the courses, four 
majors and three minors, receives the degree of Candidatus Sacrce 
Theologice. 

The requirements for the C. S. T. degree are "four majors and three 
minors, — one major from each of the four main departments, viz., Old 
Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis, the Historical, and the 
Systematic departments; and one minor from the Introductory group, 
one from the Practical group, and a third from any one of the four 
main departments." 

No one, however, may register for this degree unless he has passed 
the examinations and completed the requirements for the B. D. degree 
according to the curriculum of the Seminary and has previously ac- 
quired the A. B. degree from a recognized college. If a student is a 
graduate of some other Seminary he must prove by testimonials that 
his theological studies correspond to our course for the B. D. degree 
or comply with its requirements, and he must be an A. B. from a 
recognized college. Non-resident students qualifying for the B. D. 
degree are required, besides the matriculation and diploma fees, to 
pay a fee of five (5) dollars to the professor in the department of the 
topic selected. 

At least one course should be completed each year; but under all 
circumstances a student must report progress before April 1st of each 
year, otherwise the name of the student will be dropped from the 
catalog without previous notice. These studies may be carried on by 
correspondence, but in his own interest the student is urged to make, as 
far as feasible, the major part of his work resident study. Candidates 
may present themselves for the required oral and written examinations 
at any time during the school year. By special arrangement other 
examinations may take the form of a written treatise. 

The fee for the C. S. T. degree is $65, divided as follows: five (5) 
dollars registration fee to the treasurer of the Institution when matricu- 
lated; five (5) dollars for the diploma when the degree is conferred; 
ten (10) dollars for each major and five (5) dollars for each minor at 
the beginning of the course to the professor of the subject. 

The degree of Sacrce Theologice Doctor is conferred upon a Candi- 
datus Sacrse Theologise who presents an acceptable thesis indicating 



68 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

original and fairly exhaustive research work along the chosen line of 
study and giving evidence of being an actual contribution to the sum 
of theological science. The theme and the thesis must be approved by 
the Theological Faculty. The thesis must cover at least 75 printed 
or 100 typewritten pages, and be submitted in at least two copies. For 
the examination of the thesis by the several members of the Faculty a 
fee of twenty (20) dollars is required, and a charge of five (5) dollars 
is made by the Institution for the diploma when the degree is conferred. 
A candidate for the S. T. D. must have been in the ministry not less 
than seven years. 

The above degrees are granted by the Board of Directors on the 
recommendation of the Theological Faculty and conferred at the Com- 
mencement Exercises of the Seminary. 

Further information will be furnished by the individual professors 
on application to the Secretary. Address: Professor C. J. Sodergren, 
1010— 28th Street, Rock Island, 111. 






CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 69 



The Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art. 



THE CONSERVATORY YEAR 

The school year in the Conservatory consists of thirty-six weeks 
divided into four terms as follows: two Fall terms of eight weeks 
each, and two Spring terms of ten weeks each. 

CALENDAR 
1917 
Fall semester, first term, begins 9 a. m., Monday, Sept. 3. 
Fall semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Oct. 27. 
Fall semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Oct. 29. 
Fall semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Dec. 22. 

1918 
Spring semester, first term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Jan. 7. 
Spring semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Monday, March 6. 
Spring semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, March 18. 
Spring semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, May 25. 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. O., K. V. O., 

President. 
JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A. A. G. O., 

Director, 
Professor of Piano, Organ, Harmony, Director of Handel Oratorio Society, Wennerberg 

Chorus (male voices). 

Rev. E. F. BARTHOLOMEW, Ph. D., D. D., LL. D., 

Lecturer on Psychology in its Relation to Music. 

OLOF GRAFSTRoM 

Professor of Painting and Designing. 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music and Director of Orchestra. 

LEWIS BODMAN CANTERBURY, 

Professor of Voice. 



70 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

ARVID SAMUELSON, Mus. Bac, 
Professor of Piano, Advanced Piano Pedagogy, and Director of Oriole Club (ladies' voices). 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc. B„ B. E., 

Teacher of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

LILLIE CERVIN, B. S., 

Teacher of Piano, Assistant in Organ. 

WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 

Teacher of Public School Music, Piano, and Harmony. 

ALTHEA BROWN, 

Teacher of Voice. 

ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Teacher of Piano. 

CARL HARRY KALQUIST, 

Teacher of Wind Instruments, Director of Band. 

LAWRENCE LUNDBERG, RUTH CARLMARK, MARTIN 
DAHLBERG, LEROY CARLSON, 

Student Instructors. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



In these days when almost every scheme of education must include 
a course of music, the question where such a course can best be ob- 
tained, is one of vital importance. The multiplicity of musical col- 
leges and conservatories, to say nothing of private teachers, makes the 
solution of the above problem none the easier. It is the purpose of 
this catalog to show some of the advantages possessed by the Augustana 
Conservatory of Music. 

Music is an important factor in a broader education, as an indis- 
pensable factor in cultural development, is gradually gaining ground. 
All the larger colleges and universities are placing the same in their 
curricula. Every individual who claims to be intelligent should feel 
the need of a better understanding and appreciation of music, the 
language of emotions. 

We are living in a practical age, and much of the education in our 
day tends to develop the practical man; but man's needs are not only 
practical, they are also esthetic and sympathetic. We need in this 
country not only a full head and full pocket book, but a full heart as 
well; but the study of music is not the development of the emotions 
only, pure emotionalism weakens character. A musical education 
should develop the intellectual man as well. One of our great educators 
has said: "Music is the best mind trainer on the list." A musician 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 71 

should be not only a reproducer of others' thoughts and ideas, but a 
broad intelligent thinker; not merely pianist, organist, violinist and 
singer, but musician. Then again, in order to be a broad musician, the 
student should know not only Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, 
etc., but Shakespeare, Holmes, Emerson, Longfellow, etc. A broad 
musical education means a broad intelligent grasp of the hopes, fears, 
and ambitions of man, analytically, comparatively, and historically. 

An institution offering the student an opportunity for such study, 
a conservatory giving the music student such privileges is unquestion- 
ably better equipped to give the student the best advantages. Another 
feature not to be lost sight of is the fact that the student is brought 
in contact with other students who are his equals or superiors. This 
is one of the strongest possible incentives to hard work, and if the 
pupil has any talent or ambition at all, this competition is sure to 
bring it out. And not only the contact with music students, but the 
interchange of ideas with students along other lines is a distinct 
advantage to the music student. 

COMBINED MUSIC AND LITERARY COURSES 
As the Augustana Conservatory is able to offer many advantages in 
literary and scientific study on account of its affiliation with a College 
and Academy of the first rank, attention is called to the importance of 
properly selected studies for students, be they particularly gifted in 
music or not. A student of music will find it very difficult to carry all 
his high school or college studies and progress satisfactorily in music 
at the same time. Therefore, as the pupil's general education must not 
be stopped nor his music study too much neglected, a course must be 
selected that will give him a good, general education and at the same 
time afford him opportunity to give careful attention to his work in 
music. A great many students take advantage each year of some com- 
bined music and literary course, some making more of a specialty of 
general subjects, others specializing in music. The director as well as 
the various teachers will gladly assist in selecting subjects most neces- 
sary and helpful to the student and in arranging the various courses. 
By taking a regular four years' course in music, which includes a num- 
ber of general subjects, the student will not only receive as much men- 
tal discipline and training as can be had from other courses during a 
similar period of time, but he will have the double advantage of being 
well equipped in music and having a good, practical knowledge of 
general subjects. 

COURSES AND CREDITS 
There is unquestionably a distinct advantage in placing the work 
done in a department of music on a strictly credit basis. The guess 
work on the part of teachers is corrected, the uncertainty in the prog- 



72 COXSEKVATOBY OF MUSIC 

ress of the student is to a great extent eliminated. The students learn 
from time to time just how the teachers rate their work. This is an 
incentive to those who are ambitious and a lash to those who are care- 
less. To the student who is conscientious it is an encouragement. 

The usual method of designating courses in music is by grades. But, 
in order to facilitate matters in giving credits, a plan of courses similar 
to the one used in the college and academy has here been adopted. By 
the word "course" is meant the work outlined in a subject for a semes- 
ter. 1 Credits are based on the number of practice and lesson hours per 
semester. One credit is allowed each semester for every three hours 
weekly practice, or, for two half hour lessons per week. 

The "courses" as indicated below for piano or violin require of the 
average student at least three hours daily practice (18 hours weekly) 
and two half hour lessons per week. Seven credits should therefore be 
allowed for one semester's work in either subject. However, owing to 
the unequal lengths of the semesters, seven credits are given in the fall 
and eight in the spring — fifteen credits for the year. 

Four and five credits are allowed each semester for the "courses" in 
organ and voice as these courses require only approximately twelve 
hours practice and two lessons per week. 

The work in theoretical and music-literary subjects is credited in the 
same manner as that in college or academy subjects. 

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES 

Diplomas are conferred upon students who have been in the conser- 
vatory at least one year and who have completed one of the regular four 
year courses for graduation or a postgraduate course, or, the two years' 
course in Public School Music together with a four year high school 
course or its equivalent. 

Teacher's certificates are issued to students who have completed the 
course up to and including the junior year in the regular four year 
courses or the two years' course in Public School Music minus a high 
school course. 

Students having completed the course in Methods (see Public School 
Music) will be granted a certificate. 



1 ) It will be noted, however, in the description of the courses below that the work is 
outlined for the year rather than for the semester. This is done because of the difficulty 
of being absolutely specific in outlining work in as subtle and elastic a subject as music. 
But as marks of standing and credits are given at the end of each semester, it is necessary 
to divide the year's work into two parts and therefore convenient to designate each part 
as a "course." 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 73 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 
Students taking a four year course and who wish to receive a grad- 
uate's diploma must have 160 credits apportioned as follows: 

Maj. Subj. Theory, etc. Recital Piano English *Electives Total 

Piano— 60 27 10 27 36 160 

Organ— 27 26 10 45 27 25 160 

Violin— 60 27 10 15 27 21 160 

Voice— 27 23 10 45 27 28 160 

For a diploma in the Public School Music course 94 credits and a 
four year high school course, or equivalent, including 4 years English, 
are required. 

Credit will be given for work done elsewhere. 

Students must have some preliminary training in music before en- 
tering a regular four year course. No credits are allowed for this pre- 
paratory work. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 
Graduates Diploma. 
Piano as major subject. 
First Year. 

Piano courses, 1-2 15 credits 

Theory courses, 1-2, 3-4 4 

English courses, 3-4* 8 " 

Second Year. 

Piano courses, 3-4 15 credits 

Theory courses, 5-6, 7-8 6 

English, 5-6* 9 " 

* (See outline of courses in Academy.) 

Third Year (Junior). 

Piano courses, 5-6 15 credits 

Sight Playing 2 

Theory courses, 9-10 4 

History of Music course, 1-2 2 

Advanced Piano Pedagogy 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Piano courses, 7-8 15 credits 

Psychology 2 " 



l ) The electives may be musical or literary, or both. 



74 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

History of Music, 3-4 2 credits 

Normal 2 

Theory (course 13) 1 " 

Recital 10 

Electives during course 36 " 

Organ as major subject. 
First Year. 

Before taking up the organ the pupil shall have finished the pre- 
paratory and first year in piano 27 credits 

Second Year. 

Organ, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 " 

English, 5-6 9 

Third Year (Junior). 

Organ, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 15 

Theory, 9-10 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Organ, 5-6 9 credits 

Sight Playing 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 

Theory, 11-12-13 5 " 

Recital 10 

Electives during course 25 



Violin as major subject. 
First Year. 

Violin, 1-2 15 credits 

Theory, 1-2, 3-4 4 

English, 3-4 8 " 

Second Year. 

Violin, 3-4 15 credits 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 " 

Piano 7 

English, 5-6 9 " 



conservatory of music 75 

Third Year (Junior). 

Violin, 5-6 15 credits 

Theory, 9-10 4 

Piano 8 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

Ensemble 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Violin, 7-8 15 credits 

Psychology 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Ensemble 2 " 

Normal 2 

Theory, 13 1 " 

Recital 10 

Electives during course 21 

With Voive as major. 
First Year. 

Before entering this course in voice the student shall have fin- 
ished the preparatory and first year in piano 27 credits 

Second Year. 

Voice, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 " 

Theory, 5-6, 7-8 6 " 

English, 5-6 9 " 

Third Year (Junior). 

Voice, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 15 

Theory, 9-10 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 10 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Voice, 5-6 9 credits 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 

Theory, 13 1 

Ensemble 2 

Recital 10 

Electives during course 28 



76 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
First Year. 
Theory 

a. Courses 1-2 (notation, terminology, elementary ear 

training and sight singing) 2 credits 

b. Courses 3-4 (sight singing and ear training) 2 hours 

per week 2 " 

c. Courses 7-8 (harmony) 2 hours per week 4 " 

d. Melodic construction (Spring term 1 hr. per week) . . 1 
Pedagody of Music 

a. Methods — Study of Rote Songs (Pall term 1 hour 

per week) 1 

b. Child Voice (Pall term 1 hour per week) 1 

c. Primary grades (Spring term 2 hours per week) 2 

d. Class observation (Spring term 3 hours per week) . . 1 

Elementary Psychology (Pall term 3 hours per week) 3 

History of Music (Fall term 2 hours per week) 4 

Piano courses 1-2 15 

Voice courses 1-2 9 

Ensemble — chorus or orchestra 2 

Drawing (optional) 8 

Second Year. 
Theory 

a. Courses 5-6 (ear training and sight singing) 2 hours 

per week 2 credits 

b. Courses 9-10 (harmony) 2 hours per week 4 " 

c. Elementary Form and Analysis (Fall term 1 hr. per 

week) 1 " 

d. Appreciation (Spring term 1 hour per week) 1 

Pedagogy of Music 

a. Methods — Intermediate, Grammar and High School 

Chorus conducting. Study and conducting of school 
orchestras (4 hours per week) 8 

b. Practice teaching (3 hours per week) 3 

History of Education and General Pedagogy 2 

Piano courses 3-4 15 

Voice courses 3-4 9 

Ensemble — Chorus or orchestra 2 

Drawing (Optional) 8 

COLLEGE AND ACADEMY CREDITS FOR MUSIC 
The College faculty has considered the granting of College and 

Academy credits for work in music, and decided as follows: 

1. That we recognize music as a subject for entrance to college to 

the extent of one-half or one unit. 



CONSEBVATORY OF MUSIC 77 

2. That we allow ten credits in our academy for a two year course 
in music, as outlined in the accompanying statement, at the rate of 
two credits for each fall term and three for each spring term; provided 
that these credit-hours are entered in the regular way on the student's 
course-slip. 

3. That we allow a maximum of ten credits to students enrolled 
in college, the number of credits per term and the other conditions 
being the same as above stated for academy students. 

COLLEGE 

Applied Music Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Advanced grades. 

2 years, one lesson per week. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music. 

Methods — advanced (Including Sight singing, Ear training and 
practice teaching). 
Harmony. 1st year. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble work (Chorus, Orchestra, Band). 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Theory Course. 

Harmony, 2nd year. 

Musical Essentials and appreciation. 

History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 10 credits. 

ACADEMY 

Applied Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin or Voice intermediate grades. 

(2 years, 1 lesson a week). 

Sightsinging — 1st and 2nd years. 

2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music Course. 
Methods. Primary. 

Sightsinging and Ear training 1st and 2nd years. 
Ensemble. (Chorus, Orchestra or Band). 
2 years. 10 credits. 



78 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Theory Course. 

Harmony. 1st year. 

Psychology in its relation to Music. 

Sightsinging and Ear training 1st and 2nd years. 

Ensemble. 2 years. 10 credits. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

THE PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT 

The course in pianoforte is designed to equip the student for a career 
as soloist or teacher, or both, and diplomas and certificates are granted 
accordingly. 

The course is based on the dynamic and technical possibilities of the 
modern grand piano and its literature; a comprehensive study of the 
muscles of the shoulder, arm, wrist, hand and finger, the control of 
which is absolutely essential to the attainment of mastery of the art 
of piano-playing. 

The prescribed course requires about five years of the regular student 
of average ability, presuming practically no knowledge of the instru- 
ment when entering the school and also presuming a natural talent 
and maturity of character. 

Due credit will be given to students having completed partial courses 
elsewhere or for work taken under accredited private instructors. 

Advanced and graduate students will have the opportunity of playing 
with instructors in concerted numbers. 

Those not candidates for graduation may have the privilege of elect- 
ing work according to their ability and preparation. 

The course is practically as follows: 

Preparatory. 
Fundamental principles of piano technic applied according to indi- 
vidual needs. Koehler, Op. 50. Sonatinas by Heller and Kuhlau. Easy 
compositions by Reinecke, MacDowell and Lichner. 

First Year. 
Courses 1 — 2. 

Scales and arpeggios: Loeschhorn, Op. 65; Duvernoy, Op. 120; Son- 
atinas by Heller, Lichner and Dussek. Easy compositions by Merkel, 
Jensen, Reinecke and Mendelssohn. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Second Year. 
Courses 3 — 4. 

Major and minor scales in thirds, sixths, octaves and tenths; Seventh 
chord arpeggios. Octave studies begun. Beren's Velocity and works 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 79 

of Czerny. Bach, Two and Three-part Inventions. Sonatas by Clementi, 
Haydn and Mozart. Compositions by Grieg, Mendelssohn, Moszkowski, 
Schubert and MacDowell. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Third Year (Junior). 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Scales and arpeggios in various notions and forms. Tone production 
and study of trill. Selected studies of Cramer; Pedal studies by Gorno 
and Whiting; Kullak, Octave Studies; Preludes and Fugues of Bach. 
Sonatas by Mozart, Weber and Beethoven. Ensemble playing in com- 
positions of modern writers. Compositions by Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schubert, Grieg, MacDowell, etc. 7 — 8= 15 credits. 

Fourth Year (Senior). 
Courses 7 — 8. 

Advanced technical work: Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; Scales 
in double thirds. Bach, Well Tempered Clavichord. Sonatas by Mozart, 
Schubert and Beethoven. Studies by Chopin, Liszt and Godowsky. 
Various works by romantic composers, viz., Chopin, Liszt, Schubert. 
Arensky, Schumann and Debussy. Concertos by Schumann, Chopin, 
Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Saint-Saens and Grieg. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

The above courses are suggested to give a general idea of the standard 
maintained and cannot be adhered to strictly, as the needs of no two 
individuals are exactly the same. 

Post-Graduate Piano Course. 

This course is established to give the graduates of this school and 
others schools of equal grade, who wish to pursue an artist's career, 
additional training and finish. The course will be two years in length, 
on the completion of which a post-graduate diploma will be given, signed 
by the Director and instructor. A complete recital must be given by 
each candidate during the second year and a thesis prepared. 

The following works, or their equivalents, represent the post-graduate 
course : 

Last five sonatas by Beethoven. Arrangement of Bach's organ works 
by Liszt, d'Albert and Busoni. Sonatas of Chopin, Liszt, Brahms and 
MacDowell. Paganini-Brahms, Variations. Transcendental Etudes of 
Liszt. Balakirew, Fantasie Orientale "Islamey." Godowsky arrange- 
ments of Chopin Etudes. Concertos by Beethoven, Tschaikowsky, 
Brahms and Liszt. 

Course in Piano Sight-Playing. 
A course in piano sight-playing will be conducted for those who are 
unable to read instrumental music at sight. Proficiency in this subject 



80 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

is strictly insisted upon before graduating from the piano department. 
Lessons are given in classes of three and special attention is given to 
rhythm, embellishments, accompaniments and transposition. This 
course is open only to students of courses 5-6-7-8. One year=2 credits. 

Course in Advanced Pedagogy. 
A course in advanced pedagogy is given to equip graduates for their 
profession as teachers of music. This course covers all subjects relating 
to the needs of a musical instructor and is invaluable especially to those 
expecting to devote their lives to the profession of teaching music. 
This course aims to emphasize the essentials in the teacher's equipment. 

Spring term, two periods a week, 2 credits. 

Interpretation Classes. 
The director of the piano department will conduct a course in piano- 
forte interpretation which will be open to seniors and post-graduates 
of this school and others of equal standing. This course will consist 
of discussion, criticism and demonstration and special coaching for 
individual members preparing for recitals. These classes will be 
limited to six members each. One year=2 credits. 

THE ORGAN DEPARTMENT 
Courses 1 — 2. 

Some good organ school, such as C E. Clements. Easier trios for 

organ. Hymnology. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4. 

Hymnology (Phrasing, Registration, Transposition). The church 
service. Easier works of Bach, Guilmant, Rheinberger and others. 

4 — 5. 9 credits. 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Practical modulation and accompanying. The larger works of Bach, 
Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Widor and others. At least three sonatas 
from standard works, and three from Bach's studied, a recital to com- 
plete the courses. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 
Post-Graduate Courses (2 years). 

A continuation of Courses 5 — 6. The larger works of the great mas- 
ters. A comprehensive understanding of the literature for the organ. 

THE VOICE DEPARTMENT 

Foreword 

Prospective students in this department should bear in mind that 

the study of Voice presents some aspects radically at variance with 

piano, organ, violin, or any instrumental study. Of these differences 

the two most important are: 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 81 

First, the fact that the playing of a piano, violin, organ, etc., is 
a purely artificial accomplishment — that is, no person by nature and 
with no previous knowledge of a piano or violin can play at all; while 
every human being can to some degree and has from the cradle con- 
stantly produced vocal articulation and sounds. It follows, that varia- 
tions in natural ability to sing in any hundred beginning vocal students 
is much more pronounced; and from this it again follows that any 
curriculum or course of study must be capable of much less rigid 
application in the individual cases, than in the case of piano, violin 
or instrumental study. 

The second point to be remembered is this: In the production of 
tone from any musical instrument — voice, piano, violin, organ, etc., — 
there are three elements: 1) a motor force, 2) a vibrating element, 
and 3) a resonating element, i. e., a sounding board. The important 
fact is often overlooked that in piano study the second and third of 
these elements, i. e., the strings and sounding board, are artificially 
constructed of steel and wood, in the human voice the entire three 
elements are flesh and blood actuated by the most delicate nervous 
impulses, the exact nature of which is still in doubt in the minds of 
the greatest scientific authorities. 

Any curriculum of Voice study is thus subject to larger modifications 
than is the case in instrumental study, and on the sympathetic insight 
of teacher and the loyal co-operation in mind as well as body of the 
pupil will depend ultimate success. How much of a truth this is — 
how greatly a mental concept of vocal tone transcends any possible 
apposition of ligaments, muscles, etc., however admirable, may be in- 
ferred from the fact that while a beginning piano or violin student is 
generally advised to practice a number of hours daily, Mrs. Marchesi 
and Signor Manuel Garcia, perhaps the two greatest authorities in 
the realm of pure Italian "Bel Canto," advise a vocal beginner to 
practise 10 or 15 minutes at a time only, several times daily, — a total 
of not over one hour daily. 

Modified always by the important limitations noted above, the cur 
riculum for a three year Vocal Course will be as follows: 

Courses 1 — 2. 

(1) A careful preliminary explanation of the vocal functions, breath 
actuation and control; the action of the laryngeal muscular system — 
the "coup de Glotte"; the location and functions of the resonance 
cavities in the head and face, and the articulating mechanism of the 
tongue and jaw. 

(2) The portamento scale; exercises for blending the registers and 
equalizing the scales, when needed. 

(3) Attack and tone placing, with gradual progression in scales and 
arpeggios of increasing speed, power and difficulty. 

College Catalog 6 



82 CONSERVATORY OP MUSIC 

(4) Simple songs of a sustained nature, regarded principally as Vocal 
Exercises; also Concone's Vocal Exercises. 

(The basis of study will be the Old Italian Method, as exemplified 
in Marchesi's "Art of Singing," and Garcia's "Art du Chant," which 
will be the text-books used. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4. 

(1) Marchesi and Garcia Exercises continued, including the estab- 
lishing and control of single tones, swelling and diminishing them 
(the old Italian "mezza di voce"). Scales of increasing power and 
agility. 

(2) Songs of increased difficulty and superior classical composition 
and form, increasing the musical and esthetic knowledge and taste of 
the pupil. These songs will include the simpler German Lieder, French 
Chansons, and a few of the less difficult Opera Arias of a legato nature. 
The attention of the student will then be gradually directed from 
technical considerations — the tone placing, breath control, etc. — to the 
interpretative side, including careful attention to the wofully neglected 
consideration of pure vowel production and a just enunciation of con- 
sonants and diphthongs. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 5 — 6. 

Special studies in Agility, Bravura, and the adequate Declamation 
of Recitatives, both free and in tempo. Oratorio and Operatic Arias 
of increased difficulty, and the Lieder of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, 
Grieg, Richard Strauss, Max Reger, etc.; French songs of the old 
school, — Gounod, Massanet, Godard; and of the newer school, — De 
Bussy, Ravel, Gabriel Faure, and Henry DuParc. In brief, as much 
of the required accomplishment of a finished singer as may be per- 
mitted by the time and the capacity, physical and mental, of the pupil. 

On graduation, the student will be expected to sing acceptably, from 
memory, selections from the standard oratories, such as: 

(Soprano) — "Hear ye, Israel," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah"; "With 
Verdure Clad," from Haydn's "Creation"; "I will extol Thee,' from 
Costa's "Eli," etc. 

(Alto) — "Oh Rest in the Lord," from "Elijah"; "He was despised," 
from Handel's "Messiah." 

( Tenor )— "Be Thou Faithful," from Mendelssohn's "St. Paul"; "Com- 
fort Ye," and "Every Valley," from Handel's "Messiah"; "If with all 
your hearts," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah." 

(Bass) — The "Messiah" solos; "Rolling in Foaming Billows," from 
Haydn's "Creation," and the "Pro Peccatis," from Rossini's "Stabat 
Mater." 

Pupils will also be required to have a reasonable repertoire of the 
standard Operatic Arias, German Lieder, and French and Italian songs 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 83 

from the sixteenth century to the present day. All this means con- 
centrated work on the mental equally with the physical side, and it is 
desired that students in this department bring such an attitude to the 
work here indicated. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 



THE VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

The courses in this department cover practically all technical phases 
and styles in violin playing. It is the aim of the department to lay a 
broad and deep foundation and to study the individual needs of the 
student. While the poetical or interpretative side of playing is always 
kept in mind, the student is early given to understand that technic 
is the real liberator of the spirit within, the means by which the spirit 
expresses itself, and must, therefore, be most carefully and diligently 
studied with that end in view. 

All students are given the privilege of ensemble practice. Advanced 
students are required to attend orchestral rehearsals regularly and 
must learn to play the viola, subject, however, to the discretion of the 
teacher. 

Preparatory. 
Laoureaux Violin School; Sevcik, Op. 6; Wohlfart, Op. 54; Keyser, 
Op. 20, Bk. 1. Easy pieces and duos by Beazley, Dancla, Rosenbecker, 
and others. 

First Year. 
Courses 1 — 2. 

Laoureaux Violin School, Part II; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. I, and Op. 2; 
Wohlfart, Op. 74; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. II; Sevcik, Op. 7 and Op. 8, 
begun. Selected pieces and duos. 7 — 8. 15 credits. 

Second Year. 
Courses 3 — 4. 

David's Violin School, Part II; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. Ill; Mazas, Op. 
36, Bks. I and II; Sevcik, Op. 8, continued; Bauer, Scales and Arpeggios; 
Sevcik, Op. 2; Kreutzer Etudes begun. Pieces by Bach, Handel, etc., 
sonatas by Haydn and Mozart, concertos by De Beriot, Kreutzer, and 
Viotti. 7—8. 15 credits. 

Third Year (Junior). 

Courses 5 — 6. 

Kreutzer Etudes; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. Ill; Sevcik, Op. 2; Fiorillo 
Etudes; sonatas, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and pieces from 
various composers; concertos by De Beriot, Mozart, Rode, Viotti. 

7—8. 15 credits. 



84 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Fourth Year (Senior). 
Courses 7 — 8. 

Rode, 24 caprices; Rovelli, 12 studies; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bks. Ill and IV; 
concertos and concert pieces by Rode, Spohr, Hubay, Wieniawski and 
others. 7 — 8. 15 credits. 

Post-Graduate Courses (2 Years) 
Bach solo sonatas; Grand studies by Gavinies, Dont, Paganini, etc.; 
standard concertos and concert pieces by modern composers. 

Viola and Violincello 
Courses in Viola and 'Cello playing are also offered which are de- 
signed to equip the student for general solo and orchestra work. 

Accompanying and Ensemble 
The director of the violin department will give a course in accom- 
panying and in piano and string ensemble to which players of the 
piano who are sufficiently advanced will be admitted. Standard violin 
solos and sonatas for piano and violin will be studied and played. 
Opportunity will also be given to study trios, quartets, etc., in which 
case practice may be had in playing with the chamber music organiza- 
tions. (See page 122). 

THE THEORY DEPARTMENT 
♦Courses 1 — 2. Notation study of the scales. 

1 hour a week. 2 credits. 
♦Courses 3 — 4. Sight singing and ear training. 

2 hours a w r eek. 2 credits. 
♦Courses 5—6. Sight singing and ear training. 

2 hours a week. 2 credits. 
Courses 7 — 8. Harmony — Intervals, triads, seventh chords. 

Harmonization of melodies. 2 hours a week. 4 credits. 

Courses 9 — 10. Altered chords, suspensions, foreign tones. 

Harmonization of melodies. 2 hours a week. 4 credits. 

Courses 11 — 12. Counterpoint. 2 half hours a week. 4 credits. 

♦Course 13. Analysis and Appreciation. 1 hour a week. 1 credit. 

♦Course 14. The Orchestra and its instruments. 

1 hour a week. 1 credit. 
♦History of Music. Courses 1 — 2, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 
♦Psychology in its relation to music. 1 hour a week. 2 credits. 

♦Lectures on Liturgies. 1 credit. 

♦Lectures on Physics of sound. 1 credit. 

♦Ensemble work (Chorus, Orchestra or Band) and accompaniment. 

2 credits. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 85 

♦Normal work. Lectures on touch and tone formation. Teaching 
repertoire. Practical work under the supervision of the teacher. 

NOTE. Courses marked with an asterisk are free, subject to rules and regulations. 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 
To properly understand music or any other art, it is necessary to 
have a knowledge of the history of its development and an acquaintance 
with the conditions under which it began and reached its maturity. 
Two courses in Music History are offered. The first course gives a 
general survey of music and its development from the earliest times 
to the present; the second course embraces special topics in the History 
of Music. Each course 2 credits. 

PSYCHOLOGY IN MUSIC 
Psychology is now regarded as the fundamental science, the science 
which must shape the methods of studying and teaching every other 
subject. Correct scientific knowledge of the human mind and of its 
various modes of activity, together with a working knowledge of the 
nervous system, lies at the bottom of all educational philosophy. Psy- 
chology stands in a most important and practical relation to the study 
of music. The demand of the present is that methods of studying and 
teaching music must be based on sound pedagogical and rational prin- 
ciples, and it is the office of psychology to discover and formulate such 
principles. The signs of the times indicate that along this line of 
progress the best results are to be achieved for the years to come. 
Augustana Conservatory, recognizing these facts and principles, makes 
the study of psychology an important part in its courses of study. 
A full course on the Relation of Psychology to Music is given, extending 
thruout the year, which all candidates for graduation are required to 
take. 2 credits. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
To meet the requirements of the supervisor and special teacher of 
music in the public schools, a two year course is offered, tho the time 
required for the completion of the work depends on the ability and 
training, the student has had previous to entrance. Those students 
who have a general musical education, may at entrance take an examin- 
ation, and, if they pass, arrangements will be made, so that they may 
complete the course in less time. 

The law of the State of Illinois requires graduation from a four 
year's high school, or an equivalent preparation, including four units 
in English. If less than four secondary units in English are certified, 
one year must be pursued in College. This course having been planned 
in conformity with the requirements of the state laws, our diploma is 



86 CONSEBVATORY OF MUSIC 

accepted as a proof of efficiency, and a State certificate granted to the 
holder upon application to the Department of Public Instruction. If a 
high school course has not been completed students may take the course 
in the Academy here, and complete it while carrying on the work in 
music. Extra time will be necessary in this case. A certificate is grant- 
ed to students completing the course in Methods including Ear training, 
Sight singing, Harmony, Practice teaching and History of Music. 

Theory — Courses 1 and 2. 

Notation and terminology — A complete review of rudiments, maj- 
or and minor scales, key signatures, key relation, rhythmic 
types, rhythmic figures, ear training. In this course the pupil 
gains the power to think tones and sense rhythm. 

Sight reading — In order to complete this course pupils must be 
able to sing at sight, in all keys, including the divided beat and 
simple chromatic progressions. 
Solfeggio Melodia Book I. 

Theory — Courses 3 and 4. 

Ear Training — Longer phrases in major and minor keys, also 

chromatic progressions. Intervals and two-part phrase. 
Sight Singing — Skips to and from chromatic tones. 
Solfeggio Melodia Book II. 

Theory — Courses 5 and 6. 

Ear Training — Harmonic. The primary and secondary triads 
of the major and minor scales. Cadences. Modulations. 

Sight Singing — Advanced Solfeggio Melodia Book III. 

Child Voice — The protection, possibilities, and compass of the 
child voice. The girl and the boy voice compared. Mutation, 
special attention to the less gifted child, treatment of mono- 
tones. 

Melodic construction and Elementary Form. The principles goT- 
erning progression of tones, and the relations of accent to me- 
ter; rhythmic varieties applied to melody. The phrase period. 
The two and three part form. 

Pedagogy of Music. 

This course is devoted to the study of methods and material. 
Special attention is given to the selection, teaching and inter- 
pretation of rote songs. The work of each grade is taken up 
in detail and the problems of melody and rythm are classified, 
systematically arranged, presented and drilled. The various 
series of books published for public school use are examined, in 
order that the student may be familiar with the best material 



CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 87 

available and know how to use the same to best advantage. 
Practice teaching is done, under critic teacher, a complete 
eighth grade school affords an opportunity for teaching under 
supervision and criticism of the instructor. Special attention 
is given to the work of the high school, courses outlined in 
musical appreciation, sight singing, theory, history of music. 
Other topics considered are: the school chorus, orchestra, glee 
clubs, and a practical course of conducting. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
TIME NECESSARY 
The time required to finish any of the preceding courses is different 
according to the circumstances. First, it depends on the pupil's ad- 
vancement on entering the Conservatory, and secondly, on his talents 
and industry. 

It is advisable to take ample time for the work required, as hurried 
work never brings satisfactory results. 

EXAMINATIONS 
Final examinations in the instrumental and vocal departments are 
not left to the sole approval of the individual teachers, but must be 
held before the President and Conservatory faculty. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 

1. Students are not received at the beginning of the term for a 
shorter period than a whole term. All pupils entering the Conservatory 
after the beginning of the term must register at the rate of single les- 
sons for the remainder of the term, which means a loss of discount to 
those taking two lessons per week. 

2. Pupils obliged to leave during any term are given no rebates un- 
less for a continuous half term's absence. In special cases of pro- 
tracted illness extending over two or more weeks the pupil will be 
allowed the privilege of taking the lost lessons in a later term, pro- 
vided notice of such illness has been given at once to the professor 
in charge of the subject. 

3. Upon leaving the Conservatory each pupil is entitled to a testi- 
monial, specifying the time passed at the institution and the standing 
in the studies pursued. 

4. Regular attendance of pupils is expected at all recitals and con- 
certs given by the faculty and students. 

5. No student during his senior year will be allowed to appear in 
public without permission from his teacher. 

6. Altho not compulsory, it is advisable that pupils in all depart- 
ments take two lessons per week. 



88 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

7. Students taking two private lessons a week, are entitled to three 
free subjects in Theory, and two subjects in the Academy or Freshman 
year in College without extra charge. Students taking one lesson a 
week will be entitled to one free subject, in Theory only. 

TUITION 

J. Victor Bergquist, Arvid Samuelson, Algert Anker. L. B. Canterbury 
Two lessons a week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $22.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 22.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Single lessons 1.50 

Preparatory and intermediate grade students in Violin may be given 
a reduction in tuition, subject, however, to the discretion of the Director 
and the teacher. 

LnxiE Cervix 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $16.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 16.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 20.00 

Second spring term ( 10 weeks) 20.00 

Single lessons 1-25 

Althea Brown 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $12.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 12.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Single lessons 1-00 

Esther Fryxell 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $ 960 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 9-60 

First spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Single lessons 75 

Classes in Theory 
Two hour lessons per week: 

First fall term $ 8.00 

Second fall term 800 



CONSEBVATORY OF MUSIC 89 

First Spring term 10.00 

Second Spring term 10.00 

Classes in Sight Playing 
Two half-hour lessons per week: 

First fall term $ 6.00 

Second fall term 6.00 

First spring term 8.00 

Second spring term 8.00 

Class in Piano Pedagogy or Interpretation, each fall term $1.50, each 
spring term $2.00. 

Student Instructors 

A special children's beginners class under the supervision of the 
teachers of the Conservatory, will be organized, the lessons to be given 
by students in the Junior and Senior Years. 

Tuition for these classes. 

One lesson, private, per week: 

First fall term $2.00 

Second fall term 2.00 

First spring term 2.50 

Second spring term 2.50 

It is to be observed that all subjects in theory to students enrolled 
for two private lessons a week, with the exception of Harmony and 
Counterpoint, are free. Any student enrolled for one lesson, or regular 
students from other departments who wish to take up any of the free 
subjects in theory, can do so at the rate of $1.50 for each fall term 
and $2.00 for each spring term. 

Puolic School Music 
Pedagogy of Music (including Methods and Practise teaching): 

Each fall term $16.00 

Each spring term 20.00 

Methods (partial course) per week 1.00 

(Including sight singing and ear training.) 
Theory (see tuition for classes in courses in Theory). 
Piano, Voice, Violin or Organ (see terms of the different teachers). 
For all free subjects, see Rules and Regulations. 

Other Expenses in the Conservatory 

1. Diplomas in any of the courses $5.00 

2. Rental — Pedal organ, one hour a day, per hour 15 

Rental — Pipe organ, per hour 25 & .30 



90 CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 

3. Rental — Piano, 1 hour a day, per month 1.00 

Rental — Piano, 2 hours a day, per month 1.90 

Rental — Piano, 3 hours a day, per month 2.50 

Additional hours, per month, per hour 50 

4. Registration fee per conservatory term 50 

5. Physical Culture (optional) 

Gymnasium fee 1.00 



SCHOOL OF ART 91 



THE SCHOOL OF ART 



Olof Grafs trom, Artist. 

From the Royal Academy of Art, Stockholm, Sweden. 

In connection with the Conservatory of Music instruction is given in 
Drawing and Designing in the various branches of Painting. 

SCOPE OP WORK 

Thoro instruction is given in Drawing, Light and Shade, Still-life, the 
Cast, Antique, Fruits, Flowers, Decorative work, etc., thru the usual 
mediums, Oil, Charcoal, Crayon and Pencil. 

The methods are such as will lead most directly to work from nature 
and life, an end so easily attained by any earnest art student. 

ANTIQUE 
The advantages of this study from the antique cast are the knowl- 
edge we get of the ideal human form and the opportunity it affords the 
student for careful, cool, reflective study, thus fortifying the student 
against the difficulties occurring in work from life. 

SKETCH CLASS 
A sketch class, from life, is formed, care being taken so to arrange 
the pose that the students' sketches may be of service to them when 
they wish to introduce a figure into landscape-sketches or compositions. 

LIFE OR PORTRAIT CLASS 

The object of this study is to give the students a thoro drill in the 
study of realistic flesh-color, expression, position, drapery, harmony, 
etc. 

PORTRAITS 

Instruction will be given to those wishing to color photographs (the 
Solar print) in oil or water colors, or finish in India-Ink. 

Any one with ordinary ability can, by this means, soon learn to 
execute life-size portraits nearly as perfect as the photographs from 
which they are taken, and often with better expression. 

SACRED ART 
Prof. Graf strom has during the year, as during previous years, 
painted a large number of altar pieces for churches in all parts of the 
country, and these works of sacred art are more and more becoming 



92 SCHOOL OF ART 

recognized as productions of the very highest artistic merit. Congre- 
gations desiring to adorn their houses of worship with appropriate altar 
pieces of thoro artistic design and execution should communicate with 
Prof. Grafstrom. 

ART EXHIBITION 
During Commencement week, a free exhibition in the Art Room is 
given, which will explain, better than words, the grade and success of 
the work done in the School of Art. 

TUITION IN ART DEPARTMENT 

Each fall term, of 8 weeks, two lessons per week $15.00 

Each spring term, of 11 weeks, two lessons per week 21.00 

Annual Registration Fee 1.00 

A student paying the above tuition in advance is allowed to work in 
the Art Room five days of each week. 

Arrangements for a smaller number of lessons per week can be made 
with the professor of the subject. 

CALENDAR 
See page 66. 



ELOCUTION 93 



ELOCUTION 



Iva Carbie Peabce, Sc. B., B.E. 

The training offered the pupil in the department of oral expression 
has for its aims : 

1. The cultivation of observation, reasoning, memory and poetic 
imagination. 

2. The development of the individuality of each pupil. 

3. The freeing of his voice and body for the full manifestation of 
thought and emotion. 

4. To give him command of himself and skill in the use of his 
several powers. 

5. To arouse in him a desire to know the best in literature, and to 
vocally interpret it. 

6. To awaken the mind of each student to a just appreciation of the 
correlation of the arts. 

The following courses are offered: 

A fundamental course in articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, prin- 
ciples of grouping, bodily expression, and voice culture. 

A course in the analytical study and vocal interpretation of the best 
English and American writers. 

A course in dramatic expression. 

A course in public speaking in which pupils are trained to "think 
upon their feet," and express themselves in clear forcible speech. 

Constant endeavor is used to make all the work of this department 
of practical service to the student either as a means of general culture 
or as a training in more adequate and effective expression of himself 
in the business of every day life. 

GRADUATION 

A diploma is given upon the completion of the following course: 

First Year 



FALL 


TERM 






SPRING TERM 






Fundamental Principles 


of 


Ex- 


Fundamental Principles 


of 


Ex- 


pression 






4 


pression 




4 


Voice Culture 






1 


Voice Culture 




1 


Vocal Expression 






3 


Vocal Expression 




3 


English 






3 


English 




3 


Physical Culture 






1 


Physical Culture 




1 


Psychology 






3 


Dramatic Art 




3 



94 



ELOCUTION 



FALL TEEM 

Vocal Expression 
Development of Expression 
Oratory- 
Recitals 
Bodily Expression 



Second Year 

SPRING TERM 

Vocal Expression 
Public Speaking 
Literary Interpretation 
Recitals 



Entrance Requirements 120 credits earned in any recognized high 
school or academy. 

Pupils taking two private lessons a week receive class instruction 
without extra charge. 

TUITION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION 



Each fall term 
of 8 weeks 



Each spring term 
of 10 weeks 



One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each $12.00 

One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 6.00 

Two private lessons per week, 60 minutes each 24.00 

Two private lessons per week, 30 minutes each 12.00 

'One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each 15.00 

One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 7.50 

Two private lessons per week, 60 minutes each 30.00 

Two private lessons per week, 30 minutes each 15.00 

CALENDAR 
See page 66. 






COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 95 



The Commercial Department. 



FACULTY 



Rey. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M. Accts., LL.B., 

Principal of Commercial Department. 

ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL.B., Secretary, 

Teacher of Penmanship, Bookkeeping, Banking, Advanced Accounting, Salesmanship, Com- 
mercial Geography, Typewriting, and Lettering. 

ETTA SETTERDAHL, 

Teacher of Shorthand, English, and Spelling. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B. S., 

Teacher of Arithmetic 

REEFFE CHARLES CRAKES, M. Accts., 

Assistant in Bookkeeping. 1 ) 

WALTER CARL EDWARD SPENCER, Grad. Acct., 

Assistant in Bookkeeping. 2 ) 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Twenty-nine yearo ago the Board of Directors of Augustana College, 
perceiving the great demand for practical business training among the 
youth of this country, founded in intimate connection with other de- 
partments of the institution, the Augustana Commercial Department. 
This department has since grown, from a comparatively small begin- 
ning, into a thoroly equipped business training school, preparing annu- 
ally, in a most thoro manner, a large number of young people for the 
various lines of business. 

The department offers two courses of study which are as complete, 
symmetrical, and practical as untiring efforts, close observation of 
business methods, and experience can render dem. Instruction in the 
Christian religion is also provided for in that a regular course of Bible 
Study is offered to all students. The faculty is composed of skilled and 
carefully trained teachers, and the patronage consists of a class of 
young people who are characterized by intelligence, good character, 
ambition, and an earnest devotion to their own real interests. 

*) During Fall Term. 
2 ) During Spring Term. 



96 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

Course Leading to Graduate Accountant. 
Entrance Requirements: 

The entrance requirements for this course is the completion of 
Eighth Grade work, or its equivalent. 

Course. 

1. Bookkeeping 10 hours a week for 34 weeks. 

Four Sets of "20th" Century Bookkeeping. 

Office Practise in College Bank 2 weeks. 

2. Commercial Arithmetic 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Civil Government 5 hours a week for 16 weeks. 

4. Commercial Law 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

5. Penmanship 4 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Spelling and Defining 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

7. Correspondence 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

8. English Grammar 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

(Academy I or equivalent). 

9. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of from 60% to 

79% on Final Examination (excepting Spelling 90%) will be entitled 
to a Certificate for such work. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of 80% or more 
on Final Examinations (excepting Spelling 90%) will be entitled to the 
degree Graduate Accountant. 

The following subjects are offered as electives. 

1. Advanced Accountancy 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

Wholesale Accounting. 

Commission and Jobbing. 
Cost Accounting. 
American National Banking. 
Adding Machine Exercises. 

Special Sets: 
Lumber Accounts. 
Farm Accounts. 
Furniture Accounts. 

2. Lettering and Ornate Penmanship 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Advertising and Salesmanship 1 hour a week for 16 weeks. 

STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

1. Stenography 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

2. Typewriting 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Spelling and Defining 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

4. English 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

5. Correspondence 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

7. Commercial Law 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 97 

REMARKS ON COURSES OF STUDY 

BOOKKEEPING 

The student assumes the position of bookkeeper for some person 
engaged in business at the beginning of his work, and continues in this 
capacity until the course is completed. This is much better than 
having him use his own name and keep books for himself, since it 
is a known fact that very few men engaged in business keep their 
own books, this being done by the bookkeeper who is employed for 
that purpose. The student receives a salary from the beginning until 
the work is completed, the same being increased from time to time as 
his knowledge of bookkeeping increases. He makes no entries on his 
books except from the transactions made by his employer, which are 
indicated to him by the business papers representing the transaction, 
or by direct instruction of his employer. These business papers and 
instructions are put up in envelops designated "Business Transactions," 
as explained hereafter. 

Since the student, who has assumed the position of bookkeeper, 
knows nothing in regard to the principles of bookkeeping, or the 
method of recording the transactions, it is necessary that he be given 
instructions in regard to these. The instructions are contained in a 
book, designated as the "Reference Book," and the student is given 
references to this book by either paragraph number or the page on 
which the transactions are to be found. Thus when he opens an 
envelop and finds therein a business transaction, he is given any needed 
instruction by his employer in regard to this, and is then referred to 
the Reference Book for the principles involved and the method of 
recording the transaction on his books. 

PART I 

The object of this work is to give the student a thoro explanation 
of the principles of bookkeeping and their application. In this work 
only two books are introduced, the Journal as the book of original 
entry, and the Ledger, as that of complete entry. By constant use of 
the Journal where the debits and credits of each transaction are 
clearly set forth, the student will soon learn that each transaction 
must affect at least two accounts, each amount being equal, and that 
where more than two accounts are affected, the debits and credits 
arising therefrom must be equal. 

The transactions to be recorded cover a period of three months' 
time, January, February, and March. For the first few days' work, 
only one transaction is placed in an envelop, which is to prevent the 
student from getting confused, but after the first few days' work is 
completed a number of transactions are placed in each envelop and 
cover a period of two or three days. Each business paper, which 

College Catalog 7 



98 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

represents a transaction to the student, is a reproduction of some form 
in use by some business house or bank. The transactions are identical 
with those in any business community, the student assuming the 
position of bookkeeper for Mr. Goodwin, who is engaged in the retail 
grocery business. In this work the student takes off four Trial 
Balances, makes three Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger three 
times. In addition he is given a thoro drill in bill making, writing 
notes and checks, dealing with a bank, and the handling of the various 
other business papers used in every day business. The explanation 
for the doing of each of these is given in the Reference Book. 

PART II 
In this work the student assumes the position of bookkeeper for 
C. W. Kneeland, who is engaged in retail business. The object of this 
work is to teach the practical application of the principles of debits 
and credits by introducing the Sales-book, Invoice-book, and Cash- 
book. The student is given a thoro explanation of the uses and 
advantages of each of these, also an analysis showing the work saved 
by their introduction. The work of this part covers a period of three 
months, each envelop containing the instructions for three days. In 
addition to learning the use of the above-named books, the student is 
taught how to render statements of accounts to customers on the first 
of the month, the use of special columns in the Cash-book, the entries 
required when a partner is admitted into the business, and various 
other important points. In this work the student takes off three Trial 
Balances, makes two Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger twice. The 
Trial Balances have from 50 to 65 accounts, which makes the work 
more interesting to the student, it being necessary for him to depend 
on his own accuracy in keeping a history of so many accounts. 

PARTS III AND IV 
Part III introduces Wholesale bookkeeping, and Part IV Corporation 
and Manufacturing. The two cover a period of four months and 
require four Trial Balances, two Balance Sheets, and the closing of 
the Ledger twice. The transactions are identical with those which 
occur in the territory of any wholesale house. The advantages of 
special ruling, loose leaf devices, and the various short cuts used in 
modern accounting are clearly set forth. An opportunity is given 
the student to practically apply his knowledge of bookkeeping and test 
his ability to keep books. 

BANKING. 

Each student of bookkeeping is a bookkeeper, doing the work just 
as it is done in an office. Since the bookkeepers in the business world, 
to a certain extent, make the transactions for the banks, the students 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 99 

will make the transactions for a bank in the school room. The checks 
and money which he receives must be deposited; drafts and other 
papers left for collection; notes discounted; New York exchange pur- 
chased; change obtained; checks certified; and there are various other 
transactions which the bookkeeper must transact with the bank. By- 
having the advanced student act as a banker for those students in the 
bookkeeping work, an excellent practical course in banking is obtained. 
The student in the bank learns to make the proper record on the 
Individual Ledger, Collection and Discount Register, New York Ex- 
change Book, Teller's Book, Remittance Register, General Cash Book, 
and General Ledger. 

ARITHMETIC AND RAPID CALCULATION 
Special attention is paid to the work in this branch, and very com- 
plete courses are offered. No student can expect to progress satisfac- 
torily in the science of accounts, without having a thoro understanding 
of the subject of Arithmetic. One hour's class work a day during the 
entire course is devoted to the subject in general, and a half-hour each 
day is devoted to exercises in rapid addition, substraction, multiplica- 
tion, fractions, interest, discount, averaging accounts, etc. These drills 
are of the greatest value, making the students not only rapid and 
accurate, but giving them confidence in themselves. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT 
The education of an American citizen must always be considered 
incomplete without a thoro knowledge of the government under which 
he lives. The Commercial Department, therefore, offers a complete 
course in Civil Government. The subject is taught in such a manner 
as to acquaint the student with the functions of the various parts of 
the government machinery, the relations of the states to each other 
and to the general government and such other facts as will enable 
him to perform intelligently the duties of citizenship. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 
Altho the student is carefully drilled in the execution of business 
papers while pursuing the study of Bookkeeping, a course in Commer- 
cial Law is added to supplement his knowledge. It is not expected 
that the student will acquire professional knowledge of the subjects, 
as this would require a thoro course in a school of law. The purpose 
is to acquaint him thoroly with the legal principles which constitute 
the foundation of law. The course embraces thoro instruction in the 
following branches of business law: Contracts, Negotiable Papers, 
Guaranty and Suretyship, Interest and Usury, Sales of Personal Prop- 
erty, Bailments, Agency, Partnership, Joint-Stock Companies, Corpora- 



100 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

tions, Fire, Life, and Marine Insurance. The student is required to 
commit to memory many of the legal papers, thus enabling him to 
draw them without referring to a book of forms. 

PENMANSHIP 
All students receive daily drills in Business Writing. A clean, legible, 
rapid business hand is not an inherited gift; but any person of good 
intelligence may secure such a hand, unless physically unable to learn. 
The time required to accomplish this result varies from three months 
to one year, and is dependent upon previous opportunities and natural 
aptitude. A special Penmanship diploma is awarded to those who 
acquire proficiency in plain business writing. 

SPELLING AND DEFINING 

Daily written exercises of graded work are given. The student is 
not only taught to spell and pronounce words, but is required to define 
and memorize them, thus greatly increasing his readiness in the use 
of English. 

PRACTICAL ENGLISH 

The ability to write the English language fluently and correctly is 
a great accomplishment for any young man or woman. Special atten- 
tion is therefore given to grammatical drill and to correct use of the 
English language in speaking and writing. 

BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 
This feature of the course aims to give the pupil such suggestions 
regarding the requisites of correspondence as will enable him to con- 
struct, arrange, paragraph, and punctuate a business letter, so that 
it shall convey its intended meaning without unnecessary verbiage or 
confusion, and shall appear to the best advantage. 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY 

At the outset an apparatus and a reference book, containing the 
principles and laws of bookkeeping, are put into the hands of the 
student and are employed by him for the purpose of carrying on all 
the practical business operations and bookkeeping entries which are 
daily performed in regular business offices. 

The apparatus consists of a Bureau which contains a budget of series 
of transactions. The budget consists of a number of sheets or leaves 
secured together, upon which are printed the neccessary instructions 
and between which are contained the business papers, vouchers, and 
other memoranda, which furnish to the student the data from which 
he makes the proper entries, and performs the necessary office work. 

Each budget is so arranged that as each sheet or leaf is raised or 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 101 

torn off, the business papers, etc., of the transaction, or a number of 
transactions, are exposed for the consideration of the student. The 
sheets are so secured that the interleaved matter cannot be removed 
or examined until the sheet and business papers are torn off or re- 
moved. 

WHOLESALE SET 

The purpose of this set is to illustrate a wholesale business con- 
ducted by a partnership, at first consisting of two persons. An addi- 
tional partner is admitted later. The business of a wholesale grocery 
house is represented, with many of the peculiarities of the trade in 
groceries treated incidentally. The terms of credit, discounts, busi- 
ness methods, form and customs of this and many other wholesale 
lines are fully discussed and carefully observed in working up the set. 

This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
January, February, March, and April in which ten different books are 
introduced. 

The transactions for the months of January and February are il- 
lustrated by all the business papers received and issued. The trans- 
actions for March and April are supplied in memorandum form, the 
purpose being to direct the student's attention to the use of special 
columns in the various books of account. The business papers are 
omitted, because he has had ample practise in the preparation of all 
classes of papers pertaining to this line of business in the work of the 
two preceding months. 

A valuable feature is the very full information given in regard to 
the established customs, practices and usages that are everywhere 
followed in executing the various transactions illustrated. 

JOBBING AND COMMISSION SET 
This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
conducted as a corporation. The transactions illustrate the organiza- 
tion of a corporation, the issuing of the certificates of stock and the 
opening of the books, the series covering every phase of the jobbing 
and commission business with numerous closings of the books showing 
the disposition of the profits in accordance with the various instruc- 
tions of the Board of Directors. 

In addition to the transaction recorded in the regular set of books 
the budget contains a series of supplementary exercises in corporation 
accounts, for the opening and closing of corporation accounts and books 
under all the conditions to be met with, which are explained and 
elucidated for the training of the student. 

COST ACCOUNTING 
This is also a corporation set and introduces the special features 
of Cost Accounting. The business is conducted for the purpose of 
manufacturing gas engines, and includes the ordering of the parts, 



102 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

and, in some instances, their manufacture. The machining and as- 
sembling of the parts, and the completion of the engines called for in 
production orders, are based upon figures taken from actual production 
orders of a large manufacturer of gas engines. Indeed, the different 
manufacturing costs are taken from actual figures, with slight varia- 
tions here and there, to bring about such results as are necessary to 
illustrate the different phases of practical manufacturing. 

Time tickets, payroll sheets and other incidental papers and forms 
are used. Every detail of the business of an actual manufacturing 
concern is shown, and the various features of the usual manufacturing 
business have been so fully and carefully covered that the set can be 
used as a perfect illustration of a system of manufacturing accounts 
which may be installed in any concern, whether of large or small 
proportions. 

In working up the set, the student fills various positions. He acts 
as the bookkeeper in recording transactions in the general books as 
an accountant in the preparation of various statements and other 
documents required to exhibit the results of the business transacted, 
as stores or material clerk, as cost clerk in recording the cost of 
materials, labor and manufacturing expenses on production orders and 
in figuring the cost of finished goods, as stock clerk and as payroll 
and time clerk. 

BANKING 
This set introduces the subject of American National Banking, in a 
very interesting and complete manner. 

ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 
The aim of this course is to emphasize the essential principles of 
Salesmanship and their application. In the course of the year the 
student is required to make selling talks, 

LETTERING AND ORNATE PENMANSHIP 

It is the aim of these subjects to teach the student such lettering 
and writing as may be used in marking packages, labels, diagrams, 
plans, index records, documents, titles, show card writing, commercial 
designs, etc. 

DICTATION 

We have recently added to our already complete course the dicta- 
tion of business letters in our advanced departments. 

These letters are dictated by those in our Practical room to the 
advanced students in the Shorthand department. 

.This feature is not only very interesting, but helpful to all the 
students. It gives confidence in letter writing to those who dictate, 
and affords the very best practise to those studying shorthand, as it 
is office experience. 



INSERT. To be read immediately before the paragraph headed "Dictation," page 102. 

THE STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

The principal aim of this course is to fit young men and women for 
positions as stenographers or private secretaries. 

Class instruction is given, and so suited to the peculiarities of each 
student as to bring out the best results possible. 

STENOGRAPHY 

Our Shorthand Course qualifies young men and women for high- 
class positions in all lines of stenographic work, as amanuenses, teach- 
ers in business colleges, and for the Civil Service. 

The Benn Pitman System of Shorthand has always been taught in 
our school. The Gregg System has been used also the past year. 

After having completed the theory, the student enters upon the 
work in Eldridge's Shorthand Dictation Exercises, a special text-book 
designed as a guide to the work of accurate reporting. There are 
hundreds of letters in this book which have been selected with the 
greatest care, in order to give the student a thoro drill in the art of 
letter writing. The articles given are selections similar to those em- 
ployed in the United States' Civil Service examinations. 

TYPEWRITING 

The students of our Stenographic Course begin their work on the 
typewriter the very first day. We teach the "Touch System" from the 
beginning, and therefore the student learns to operate with blank key- 
boards. The advantages of the Touch System may readily be seen, 
for the operator is not required to takes his eyes from the notes to 
watch the keys of the machine while transcribing them. 

The typewriting room is fitted with a sufficient number of standard 
machines exclusively, including the Remington, Underwood, Royal, 
L. C. Smith, and Oliver. No expense is spared in securing the best 
instruction in this important subject. 

The typewriting room is in charge of a special and efficient teacher. 
A great deal of actual work is done in this department, including 
mimeographing of all kinds for regular customers, the orders being 
sent in from the various departments of the College. 

We teach Typewriting thoroly, as this subject is not to be taught 
by half measures and ours is not a school of half methods. Thoroness 
is our maxim, and our reward is the success of our graduates. 

A Certificate of Proficiency is awarded to students making a grade 
of 50 net words per minute. 



THE PRACTISE DEPARTMENT 
To properly fit the student, the daily routine work of the office is 
performed constantly. Large numbers of actual business letters are 
dictated to the student, who takes them down in phonography and then 
transcribes his notes quickly and neatly upon the typewriter. All 
work is handed in to be criticized; the errors are marked plainly and 
the sheets returned to the student, to be correctly rewritten. Thus 
his attention is vividly called to his deficiencies, and the importance 
of absolute accuracy is repeatedly impressed upon him. The various 
processes of letter press copying are taught, each student copying his 
approved work into proper books, according to one of these methods. 
Due attention is given to drill in folding letters, the use of the type- 
writer appliance for writing on postal cards or note paper, directing 
envelopes, regulating the margins, etc. Each student indexes his own 
letter-book, files the letters, and performs other duties about the office. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 103 

These letters are handed to the teachers for approval. Our aim is 
to furnish business men the very best help possible, and judging from 
the number of calls we are receiving for bookkeepers and stenograph- 
ers, we believe our efforts are appreciated by the business men. 

The Pitman and Gregg Systems of Shorthand are both taught in our 
school. After completing the theory, the student is given a thoro 
course in dictation and transcription from his shorthand notes. This 
work includes letters from various kinds of business offices, civil 
service work, legal forms, articles, etc. 

PHRASEOGRAPHY 

Discriminating attention is given to phrasing, or the joining together 
of two or more common and frequently recurring words, thus saving 
the time consumed in lifting the pen or pencil. The pupil is shown 
what may be done in this respect, consistently with legibility, and, as 
equally important, is advised what not to do. The text-book used con- 
tains six thousand of the most useful phrases, written in the briefest 
manner. 

BUSINESS LETTERS 

Hundreds of business letters, prepared especially for this course, are 
next dictated. These cover a wide range of subjects and form numer- 
ous complete series of correspondence, such as will occur in the future 
office work of the stenographer. Correspondence is opened with vari- 
ous firms, and the student is expected to keep informed of the progress 
of the different negotiations. 

SPEED-CLASSES, DRILLS, ETC. 
The graded speed-class, both in phonography and typewriting, pro- 
duces marked improvements combined with good work. The students 
can read the phonographic notes fluently, they are also to read each 
other's writing, as well as shorthand publications. 

SPELLING 
The course offered in this subject is calculated to correct errors of 
spelling and fix in the mind of the future stenographer not only the 
orthography of the word, but its usual meaning. 

ENGLISH 
Three years of High School English or its equivalent is required for 
graduation in the shorthand course. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 
A course in Commercial Law is also required in the Shorthand De- 
partment. 



104 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

CREDITS 
For credits given for work in the Commercial Department see Elec- 
tive Units, page 17 of this catalog. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
The cost of text-books and stationery for the full business course 
varies from $10 to $13; blank books and forms are made to order from 
the best quality of paper. The cost of books, etc., for the course in 
shorthand is about $6.50. 

TIME REQUIRED 

To complete the Business course, the bright, ambitious student aver- 
ages about nine months, altho many remain longer. Students are 
advanced as rapidly as is consistent with thoro work. 

To become proficient in phonography, typewriting, etc., to fill a first- 
class situation acceptably, the average learner requires from five to 
eight months. Students acquainted with business forms, already well 
drilled in spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., have been prepared in 
three to five months sufficiently well to take fairly good positions. 
Unless compelled to do so by special circumstances, it is not advisable 
to rush unduly thru the work, as those who take a thoro course are 
practically certain of a higher salary and more permanent employment. 



FURTHER INFORMATION 



BUILDINGS 
The College building is neatly and comfortably furnished thruout 
and heated by steam. Nothing which can add to the comfort, conven- 
ience and utility of a first class school has been omitted in the general 
equipment. 

RECITATION HOURS 
The regular hours of study and recitations are from 8 a. m. to 4 
p. m., five days of the week. Regular hours each week are set aside 
for physical training in a well-equipped gymnasium. 

DISCIPLINE 
It is assumed that the young men who enter this institution are 
gentlemen, and they are treated uniformly as such. The development 
of other characteristics will immediately sever the student's connection 
with the school. 

GRADUATION AND DIPLOMA 
The requirements for graduation in the different courses are simply 
sufficient to give a high standing to the courses and to insure the 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 105 

ability of graduates to fill and retain satisfactorily first class positions. 

In order to secure the degree of Graduate Accountant, it is necessary 
to pass a grade of 80% in all final examinations except in spelling in 
which a grade of 90% is required. Students completing the Graduate 
Accountant course but failing to secure 80% in one or more subjects, 
will be given a diploma. In the Stenographic course, the average 
working speed of one hundred words per minute in Phonography for 
not less than 10 consecutive minutes and an average speed of not less 
than 40 words net per minute is required in typewriting. 

All degrees and diplomas will be awarded at the annual graduation 
exercises of the department during the commencement week. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limit so as to bring the advantages of a thoro 
business education within the reach of all. 

Rooms heated and furnished may be secured at the institution at 
from 60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $3.00 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for $5.00 to $6.00 a week. 

TUITION 

Graduate Accountant Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 

By the week 2.00 

Annual Gymnasium Fee 1.00 

Stenographic Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 

By the week 2.00 

Annual Gymnasium Fee 1.00 

Tuition for students not taking the regular course. 

Minimum charge $ 5.00 

One hour per day, Fall term 7.00 

One hour per day, Spring term 8.50 

Two hours per day, Fall term 12.00 

Two hours per day, Spring term 14.00 

Three or more hours per day, full tution. 



106 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

The charges for diplomas are as follows: 

Graduate Accountant $5.00 

Stenographic Course 1.00 

Certificate upon completion of Graduate Accountant course with- 
out degree 1.00 

Library Fee. 

An annual Library fee of One Dollar is charged all students in this 
department. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

This department stands in the closest relationship with the other 
departments of Augustana College and Theological Seminary, and 
students in the Commercial Department may pursue any one study 
in the Academic or Normal Departments, either as visitors or as reg- 
ular members, without extra charge. This intimate connection cannot 
but act favorably upon all who take the business course, as it spurs 
them on to greater efforts, and broadens their views, by reminding 
them that all is not contained in the debits and credits of an account. 
Furthermore, a business man needs the ease and grace that come from 
contact with others; and this intermingling of a large number of well 
informed, zealous str dents, having various tastes and ambitions, and 
representing all parts of the United States, cannot but have much of 
the desired effect. Among the numerous societies at the College may 
be mentioned the Phrenokosmian and the Adelphic. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION. 
Instruction being largely individual, students may enter at any time 
during the school year. All applications for admission, or requests 
for further information, should be addressed to the President of the 
institution. 



I 



GENEBAL INFORMATION 107 



General Information 



GOVERNMENT 
Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned, supported, 
and controlled by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod. Its 
governing body is a Board of Directors, composed of the President of 
the Synod, the President of the Institution, and sixteen members — 
eight ministers and eight laymen, elected by the Synod for a term of 
four years. The meetings of the Board are held at the institution. 

FACULTIES. 

All matters pertaining to the institution as a whole which do not 
come under the jurisdiction of the Board of Directors or the President 
are in the hands of the General Faculty, which is composed of all the 
permanent professors of the institution. 

There are four Special Faculties in charge of the following depart- 
ments respectively: The Theological Seminary; the Collegiate, Aca- 
demic, and the Normal Departments; the Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art; the Commercial Department. 

The president of the institution is ex officio chairman of each faculty. 

DIVISION OF THE SCHOOL YEAR. 
The school year of thirty-six weeks is divided into two terms: the 
Fall term, embracing a period of sixteen weeks (September — Decem- 
ber), and the Spring term, embracing a period of twenty weeks (Jan- 
uary — June) . 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 
Chapel services, which all students are required to attend, are held 
in the chapel every school-day morning. Divine services are held in 
the Chapel each Sunday evening during term-time. All students living 
at the college are expected to attend these services. General and class 
prayer-meetings are held each week by the students. 

REGULATIONS 

There are but few specific rules of government, as each student 
is expected to be exemplary in manners and morals, and to deport 
himself as becomes a student of a Christian institution. 

The attendance of such students only is desired as will make faithful 
use of the educational opportunities afforded. 

Intemperance, profanity, theater-going, playing at cards and billiards, 



108 GENERAL INFORMATION 

and whatever hinders the highest mental, moral, and religious culture, 
or violates the courtesy due to instructors or fellow students, are 
prohibited. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limit, so as to bring the advantages of an education 
within the reach of all. The total necessary expenses for the entire 
school year range from $200 to $300. 

On application, heated and furnished rooms may be secured at from 
60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $3.00 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for from $5 to $6. 

All payments must be made in advance, and no money is refunded 
for unused tuition. 

A Matriculation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Academic, and Normal departments. 

A Graduation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Normal, and Music departments, and of $1 in the Commercial depart- 
ment. 

The Gymnasium Fee, $3.00 for the Fall term, and $4.00 for the 
Spring term, is required of all students in the Collegiate, Academic, 
and Commercial departments. This fee entitles students to admission 
to all varsity events, and includes use of swimming-pool and towel- 
service. 

TUITION 

The tuition Fee in the various departments is as follows 
Theological Seminary No tuition. 

Collegiate Department. . . . ( Fal1 term * 20 - 00 

J Spring term 25.00 

Academic Department. ... ( Fal1 term 16 ' 00 

I Spring term 20.00 

Preparatory Department. . t Fa11 term 1600 

J Spring term 20.00 

fFall term 30.00 

Commercial Department. J Spring term 35.00 

[Per year 60.00 

A Library Fee is charged as follows 

Academy, per term 1.00 

College and Seminary, per term * 2.00 

Other departments (optional) , per term 1.00 

Laboratory fees are charged as follows 

Biology. 

Course 4 (Botany) $2.00 

Course 7 (Zoology) 2.00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



109 



Course 8 
Course 11 
Course 12 
Course 21 
Course 22 



(Physiology) 2 - 00 

(Zoology) 3 - 00 

(Zoology 3 - 00 

(Botany) 3 - 00 

(Botany) 300 



Chemistry. 

Course 9 3 - 00 

Course 10 3 - 00 

Course 11 3 - 00 

Course 12 3 -00 

Course 13 3 -00 

Course 14 3 - 00 

Course 21 3 -00 

Course 22 3 -00 

Course 23 3 -00 

Course 24 3 -00 



Geology. 
Course 22 2.00 



Physics. 

Course 7 2.00 

Course 8 2.00 

Course 21 3.00 

Course 22 3.00 

For single subjects the following charges are made: 

(Fall term, per hour $1.00 

* " i Spring term, per hour 1.25 

In the College (Fall term, per hour 2.00 

) Spring term, per hour 2.50 

If a student enrolled in the Academy take eight hours or more of 
College studies, he shall pay college tuition. 



In the Academy 



LADIES' HALL. 
For the accomodation of lady students who prefer a home under the 
immediate auspices of the institution, a Ladies' Hall has been estab- 
lished. The rooms are carpeted, furnished, lighted, and heated, but 
each occupant is expected to provide herself with combs, toilet soap, 
towels, sheets, pillow cases, counterpane, blankets or a heavy com- 
forter, and curtains. The hall is under the supervision of Mrs. Olive 
Rydholm as Principal. 



110 GEXEBAL LNFORMATTON 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM 

MABCUS SKABSTEDT, A.M., B.L.S., LIBBABIAX. 

History. For many years the library occupied a single large room 
on the third floor of the main building of the institution. A portion 
of this room, divided off from the rest by a railing, and fitted up with 
tables and chairs, served as a reading room, while the rest was fitted 
up with wooden stacks for the storing of books. This arrangement 
served its purpose admirably for a number of years until the gradually 
accumulating collections made it more and more evident that the 
library was in sore need of larger and more adequate accomodations. 
In the opportune time this need was satisfied in a manner so fitting 
and beautiful as to exceed even the fondest dreams of those most 
interested in the literary collections of the institution. In the year 
1909 it was announced that the Denkmann family, for a long time close 
friends of the institution and of the principles upon which it is founded, 
had decided to erect upon the campus a library building costing not less 
than $100,000 as a fitting memorial to the memory of their parents and 
a gift to Augustana College and Theological Seminary. Work was 
begun upon the foundation almost immediately, and in the spring of 
1911 the building was completed at a total cost of about $208,000. In 
May of the same year, by the aid of the students and teaching force 
of the institution, the books were transferred from the old home to the 
new, and are now stored on the shelves of the magnificent building. 

Building. The building is a modernized version of the Italian renais- 
sance. It is built of the best quality of Missouri limestone, rests on 
a massive foundation of concrete, and is surmounted by a high tile 
roof. It is 120 feet long and 96 feet deep, and the major part of the 
building has three floors. The predominant characteristic in the plan 
of architecture, both as to the interior and the exterior, is that of 
massiveness. In addition to its architectural beauty the interior of 
the building possesses the advantage of very practical arrangement. 

The first floor contains the Memorial Hall, with Mosaic floor and 
walls lined with huge slabs of Italian marble; a lecture room with a 
seating capacity of about 150, and fitted with raised floor and all 
modern appliances for illustrated scientific lectures, etc.; and the 
administrative offices of the institution. From either side of the 
Memorial Hall large marble staircases lead to the second floor, on 
which are found the reading room, librarian's offices, etc. 

The reading room, extending the full length of the building, is pro- 
nounced one of the most beautiful and comfortable rooms of its kind 
in the country. The tables and other furnishings are in quartersawed 
oak and provide a seating capacity of about 200, while the shelving 
about the walls accomodates about 300 current periodicals and some 
3,000 reference volumes. Fronting each entrance is a large catalog 
case, and above the rectangle formed by the catalog cases, the loan 



GENERAL INFORMATION 111 

desk, and the doors leading to the offices and stacks, is a beautiful 
art-glass dome which receives its light from a skylight. The museum, 
just above the reading room, is fitted up with wall cases and floor 
cases for the preservation of collections, and this room receives its 
light from a row of skylights. 

The rear part of the building contains a basement which has the 
unpacking room, seven private study seminars, and rest rooms for 
ladies and men. The rest room for ladies has also a small room 
annexed which serves as a kitchen for those students who, because of 
distance, are prevented from taking lunch at home. Above the base- 
ment is the stack shaft providing room for four mezzanines, three of 
which are put in. The stacks are of Art Metal steel construction, and 
the mezzanines have glass floors. Above this shaft store rooms are 
provided for newspaper collections, etc. A portion of the first floor 
stacks is at present partitioned off and used as an alumni room. Here 
are kept the pictures, etc., of the various graduating classes. 

The building is equipped with the latest and most up-to-date heating, 
lighting, ventilating, and cleaning appliances. 

Collections. Starting with a nucleus of 5,000 volumes, chiefly his- 
torical works, presented to the library in 1862 by Charles XV, then 
king of Sweden, the library now possesses 24,577 volumes and 21,927 
pamphlets, the latter being chiefly scientific publications received in 
exchange for the Augustana Library Publications, of which seven have 
thus far been published. It has no special collections except a col- 
lection of books on missions which is constantly being increased thru 
the efforts of the Augustana Students' Foreign Mission Society. There 
is, however, connected with the library a collection of files of Swedish- 
American newspaper and other periodicals which is said to be one of 
the largest of its kind in the world. The library receives currently 
over 200 periodicals including local and Chicago newspapers, general 
and departmental American and foreign periodicals, all the more prom- 
inent Swedish-American newspapers, and many college publications. 

Provisions for growth. The growth of the library has been due 
largely to the generosity of friends. This is especially true of the 
many current p .riodicals which are regularly filed away. Altho the 
library has always suffered because of an unusually meager book fund, 
yet it feels grateful for the growth which in spite of that fact has 
been made possible thru the interest and kindness of a host of friends. 
A permanent book fund is now made possible by the fact that the 
library fee, paid by the students and other users of the library, is used 
exclusively for the purchase of books. The book fund was in 1912 
further favored by being made the recipient of a gift from Consul C. 
A. Smith of $25,000, the income of which is to be used only for the 
purchase of books for the library. Further gifts have come to the 
library from the Denkmann family amounting to over $1,200, to be used 



112 GENERAL INFORMATION 

for binding periodicals for the reference shelves. During the last year 
there have been added to the library by purchase and gift 2,357 vol- 
umes and 1,527 pamphlets. 

The list of donors for the last year up to April 1, 1917, is as 
follows : 

Vol. 

American Jewish committee 1 

Argentine Republic commission 1 

A. T. & S. F. railway 1 

Augustana Book Concern 25 

Augustana College 1 

Bahai library committee 2 

Bankers loan and securities co 4 

Benneville, James de 1 

Bergendoff, Conrad 4 

California university 1 

Carlson, E. W 1 

Carnegie endowment for international peace 1 

Ceder, Ephraim 1 

Conn, agricultural exp. station 1 

Depew. Chauncey 1 

Federal council of churches of Christ in America 2 

Felt & Tarrant mfg. co 1 

Freeman, Mrs. Theodore, Jr 38 

General education board 1 

Goddard, Dwight 2 

Hanson, Thure 1 

Harvard university 1 

Hill, S. M 1 

Hogner, Richard 5 

Holt, Hamilton 3 

Illinois 15 

Illinois university 2 

Iowa 3 

Iowa conference of the Augustana Synod 1 

Kahn, Otto H 1 

Kempe, Andrew 4 

Kuder, C. F 1 

Lake Forest college 2 

Library of congress 2 

Lundquist, Mrs 26 

Lutheran church work & observer 1 

Malm, L. L 4 

Martensen, Alfred 1 

Maxim, Hudson 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



113 



Michigan agricultural board 1 

Minnesota college 

National canners' association 1 

National wholesale liquor dealers' association 2 

N. Y. education department 1 

N. Y. state board of charities 56 

N. Y. state university 3 

Norlie, O. M 7 

Nyvall, David 8 

Odelberg, Richard » 2 

Olson, Clifford 36 

Palmgren, David 1 

Pearson, W. E * 

Peck, George B * 

Pennsylvania university 1 

Rockefeller, John D. Jr 1 

Ryden, George * 

Silversten, Carl J 1 

Smithsonian institution 9 

Stockholm, Sweden 5 

Strong, Augustus H 1 

Sward, Martin P 1 

Swedish engineers' society of Chicago 1 

Swedish historical society of America 1 

Tavenner, Clyde H 12 

Telleen, J 2 

Texas university 1 

Thompson, Slason 1 

United shoe machinery co , 1 

U. S. government 14 

Unknows givers 15 

Uppstrom, Aiwa 2 

Wallin, A. R 2 

Washington university, St. Louis 1 

Wilson, H. W. co 1 

Yale university , 10 

Classification, etc. The revised Dewey Decimal Classification is used 
for all the books, except that a special classification of religion is used 
for the books on religion. A dictionary card catalog is being made 
which enters all books in a single alphabet by author, title, and sub- 
ject or subjects. All current periodicals, all files of bound magazines 
of general interest, and several hundred general reference volumes 
are kept on the reading room shelves where they may be consulted 
without formality. An assorted collection of books on religion is also 
kept in the reading room. 
Ctilege Catalog 8 



114 GENEBAL INFORMATION 

Use. The use of the library is open to anyone upon payment of 
the library fee. Books may be drawn for a period of two weeks with 
the privilege of renewal if necessary, and the library arrangements 
are such that students may do reference work under most favorable 
conditions. All books belonging to the library are kept in the library 
building, but generous arrangements are made with the several de- 
partments as regards reference books for laboratory use. The library 
and reading room are open every weekday from 7:45 a. m. to 9 p. m., 
except on Saturday, when they close at 6 p. m. The use of the 
library is subject to the rules, a copy of which may be had at the 
loan desk. 

Students of the institution have access also to the excellent city 
libraries of Rock Island, Moline, and Davenport. 

THE MUSEUM 

MAECUS SKABSTEDT, A.M., B.L.S., CUBATOB. 

The natural history collections formerly housed on the upper floor 
of the main building are now permanently located in the museum 
room of the Denkmann Memorial Library building. Ample space and 
opportunity are here given for the proper display of the collections. 

All of the various departments of natural history are quite well 
represented. Especially is this true of the geological department with 
its thousands of fossil and mineralogical specimens, and the zoological 
department containing hundreds of well preserved specimens of mam- 
mals, birds, reptiles, and fishes. 

The museum also contains valuable ethnographical collections from 
many parts of the world; a numismatic collection of over 1,200 repre- 
sentative coins and medals besides a large number of rare and valu- 
able notes and paper money; an excellent stamp collection; and a col- 
lection of rare and interesting books and manuscripts. 

It has many miscellaneous articles and specimens of particular 
interest. 

The museum has during the year been the recipient of gifts from 
Adolph Hult, Andrew Kempe, and L. A. Lawrence. 

There are no regular museum hours, but those desiring to examine 
the collections may gain permission to do so by applying to the 
curator. 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 
This department is located on the third floor of the main college 
building, occupying the space which was formerly devoted to the 
Library and the Museum. During the summer of 1911 these quarters 
were entirely remodeled and converted into laboratory and recitation 
rooms for the department of Biology and Geology. There are in all 



GENERAL INFORMATION 115 

five rooms. On the south side is a spacious biological laboratory, 
adjoining which is a supply room. Facing the north are two rooms, 
one, a lecture room, and the other a laboratory for advanced work. 
The north and south rooms are separated by a hall at the rear of 
which is the instructor's private room. The laboratories are provided 
with water, gas and electricity. They are equipped with models, 
charts, apparatus and sinks; also chemicals, rocks, minerals and 
preserved materials for use in the various laboratory courses. The 
biological equipment is added to year by year. 

THE LABORATORY OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY. 

The departments of physics and chemistry are at present housed 
in Ericson Hall, a two-story brick structure situated north of the main 
buildings. The first floor is devoted to physics and contains a lecture 
room seating twenty-five students, and a physics laboratory provided 
with work tables for about the same number of students working at 
one time. The apparatus cases are stocked for lecture demonstrations 
and individual laboratory work in elementary and advanced physics. 

The chemical department occupies the second floor which consists 
of a lecture room seating twenty-five students, a laboratory for ele- 
mentary and advanced work, a balance room, and store room. The 
laboratory has work tables for forty students working at one time and 
is supplied with gas, electric current, draft hoods, etc. This depart- 
ment has recently received a considerable addition of apparatus and 
equipment both for elementary and advanced work. A room in the 
basement has been fitted up for work in assaying and metallurgy. 

THE HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS AND THE ARCHIVES 

PROF. O. W. FOSS, GUARDIAN AND ARCHIVIST 

Ethnographical and Numismatic 

The Ethnographical Collection contains numerous and valuable speci- 
mens from India, Africa, Palestine and Persia; relics of the late war; 
and implements, weapons, amulets, and personal ornaments of the 
American Indians. 

The Numismatic Collection consists of numerous specimens of gold, 
silver, copper, and bronze coins, together with medals and tokens. 
There is also a large collection of postage and revenue stamps, old 
paper money, fractional currency, foreign and Confederate notes, and 
continental and colonial paper money. 

Historical 
The Historical Collection of American Lutheran and Scandinavian 
American Literature has been steadily growing during the year. Com- 
plete and nearly complete files of the leading American Lutheran 



116 GENEBAL INFORMATION 

periodicals (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, 
and Finnish) have been secured and carefully arranged, also files of 
most of the Swedish-American periodicals. 

Contributions to this collection are kindly solicited. Books, period- 
icals, pamphlets, catalogs, minutes of synods and conferences, and 
whatever pertains to the history of the Lutheran Church in America 
or to the history of the Scandinavians in this country will be thank- 
fully received. 

There are now something over six hundred different papers and 
periodicals in the Swedish-American and American Lutheran collec- 
tions taken together. These papers are all arranged in volumes and 
filed away in suitable cases and cataloged so that any one wishing to 
consult some particular number of any periodical can do so at a 
moment's notice by applying to the Archivist. 

There are also large collections of duplicates. Parties wishing to 
complete their files may secure them either by purchase or by fair 
exchange. 

An interesting collection is that of the local church papers or young 
people's papers. But this collection is not nearly complete. It is 
hoped that pastors and young people's societies will kindly send in 
their papers, if possible from the first issue. Large numbers of them 
have been received during the present year. 

For contributions to this department our thanks are due to the fol- 
lowing persons: Dr. C. E. Lindberg, Augustana Theological Seminary; 
Augustana missionaries in China; Rev. and Mrs. C. W. Landahl, Tar- 
pingtien, China; Rev. F. A. Johnsson, Galesburg, 111.; Karl P. Silberg, 
Augustana College; Augustana Book Concern, Rock Island, 111.; 
Secretaries of various Lutheran Synods and Conferences, Lutheran 
Colleges, Seminaries, Academies, Orphan Homes, Hospitals, etc.; 
Publishers of newspapers and periodicals, as the following: Augus- 
tana, Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter, Svenska Amerikanaren, Kuriren, 
Monitoren, Omaha Posten, Vart Land, Svenska Veckoposten, Skandi- 
navia, Iowa Posten, Svenska Amerikanska Vastern, Pacific Tribune, 
Nordstjernan, Minnesota Stats Tidning, Svenska Folkets Tidning, 
Svenska Amerikanska Posten, Sandebudet, Chicago-Bladet, Utah Kor- 
respondenten, Svea, Utah-Posten, Medborgaren, Missions-Vannen, 
Svenska Amerikanska Tribunen, Nya Veckoposten, Finska Amerika- 
naren, Skandia, Svenska Tidningen Canada, Lindsborgs-Posten, Linds- 
borg Record, Marinette Tribunen, Svenska Posten, Arbetaren, Texas 
Posten, Swedish Pacific Press, Svenska Nordvastern, California Vecko- 
blad, Duluth Posten, Musik Tidning, For Svenska Hem, The Lutheran 
Herald, The Lutheran, The United Lutheran, The Lutheran Guide, 
The Lutheran Companion, The Lutheran Standard, The Lutheran 
Church Work, The Lutheran Mission Worker, Young Folks, Foreign 
Missionary, The Lutheran Observer, Lutheran Church Visitor, Der 



GENERAL INFORMATION 117 

Lutheraner, Lehre und Wehre, Kirchenblatt, Kirchen-Zeitung, Mis- 
sions-Bote, Missions-Taube, Kinder und Jugendblatt, Kirchliche Zeit- 
schrift, Danskeren, Ev. Luth. Kirketidende, Lutheraneren, and others. 
Contributions to these collections should be sent to the Guardian of 
the Historical Collection, Prof. C. W. Fpss, Rock Island, 111. 

THE AUGUSTANA OBSERVER. 
The Augustana Observer is a self-supporting- monthly paper published 
by the Lyceum. It aims to reflect the sentiments and the ideals of 
the student body, strengthen the bonds of comradeship between the 
students, and also to keep the alumni and the friends of Augustana in 
touch with the life and work of the institution. The editorial staff is 
elected annually from the acting members of the Phrenokosmian and 
the Adelphic literary societies. 

The subscription price is 75 cents per annum, single copies 10 cents. 
Sample copies may be had on application. 
The following are the members of the staff for the year 1917: 

Harry C. Anderson, '18 Editor in Chief 

Robert Poison, '20 Business Manager 

Elmer Swanson, '19 Ass't Business Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Dr. E. F. Bartholomew Faculty 

Ferdinand Cederburg, '19 General News 

Mae Olson, '18 Organizations 

Harry Kalquist, '18 Musical Notes 

C. George Engdahl, '16 Theological Seminary 

L. E. Jones, '15 Alumni 

Simon Fagerstrom, '19 Exchanges 

Eben Forsling, '19 Athletics 

Roy V. Peel, '19 Observatory 

THE STUDENTS' UNION 
The students' union of Augustana College and Theological Seminary 
was organized Nov. 5, 1892, for the purpose of uniting the students 
of the institution into one body. A student enrolled in any department, 
and who pays the assessment levied, is a member of the organization. 
Business of general interest to the student body is transacted. The 
annual meeting is held the third Tuesday in May. Special meetings 
are held whenever the occasions require it. 

OFFICERS 

President, Harry C. Anderson. 
Vice president, Alexander Elmblad. 
Secretary, Rudolph Hanson. 
Treasurer, Ferdinand Cederburg. 



118 GENERAL INFORM ATION 

THE AUGUSTANA FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY 

Organized by students in 1886 and incorporated in 1895, this society 
has had a steady growth, and is now strong numerically, numbering 
among its members not only students but also professors of the insti- 
tution and ministers and laymen of the Synod. 

Its aim is to arouse and maintain, especially among the students, a 
lively interest in the extension of God's kingdom in heathen lands, and, 
by means of membership fees, contributions, etc., to render pecuniary 
aid to the Synod in its foreign mission work. 

At the institution the society furnishes mission literature, arranges 
lectures and conducts mission study classes, one large class which 
meets Sunday afternoon, and several smaller classes which meet some 
hour during the week. Members of the society also visit congregations 
and conduct services in the interest of the mission cause. 

Every member who has paid $10 in membership fees becomes a life 
member. 

This year $600 will be donated to the General Council's mission in 
India, $600 to the Augustana Synod's mission in China, and $400 to 
the mission in Porto Rico. 

The officers are: Herbert Anderson, President; John Benson, Vice 
President; John A. Martin, Secretary; Dr. Carl A. Blomgren, Treasurer. 
The treasurer's address is 825 — 35th St., Rock Island, 111. 

THE PHRENOKOSMIAN SOCIETY 
This is the oldest society at the institution and was organized in 
1860 in Chicago, 111., where the institution was then located. Its object 
is to further the literary improvement and intellectual development 
of its members. The meetings, which are held on Wednesday p. m. of 
each week, are conducted in the English and Swedish languages alter* 
nately, and begin with devotional exercises. The programs, consisting 
of essays, debates, orations, declamations, music, criticism, etc., are 
interesting and instructive. A weekly paper, The Phrenokosmian, is 
published by the society, and read at every regular meeting. Students 
from any department of the institution may become members of the 
society, and upon leaving the school they become honorary members. 

THE ADELPHIC SOCIETY 
This is the younger of the two prominent literary societies of the 
institution. It was organized in 1883, and incorporated in 1884. The 
society holds its meetings on Wednesday p. m. of each week. The exer- 
cises are conducted in the English language and consist of essays, 
orations, declamations, music, etc. These exercises aim to supple- 
ment the class-room work by promoting culture and fostering a 
fraternal spirit among its members. The various officers are elected 



GENEBAL INFOBMATION 119 

each month, thus affording all an opportunity for practise in conducting 
public meetings. The society also publishes a paper, The Censor, con- 
taining articles on subjects of general interest, college news, etc. All 
students of the institution are eligible to membership in the society. 

The Adelphic Orchestra, organized for the purpose of filling a long- 
felt need within the society, not only takes an active part in the reg- 
ular programs of the society, but plays a prominent role in college 
activities in general. 

The Adelphic Society is a charter member of the Illinois Intercol- 
legiate Association of Literary Societies, composed of literary societies 
representing the universities as well as the most prominent colleges 
in Illinois. 

A joint reception is given by the Adelphic and Phrenokosmian 
societies at the beginning of each school term. The chief object of 
this reception is to furnish an opportunity for new students to become 
acquainted with the rest of the school-family as soon as possible. 

THE CONCORDIA SOCIETY 

This society was organized February 4, 1898, by students of the 
Theological Seminary. The aim of the society is the promotion of 
Evangelical Lutheran Theological culture, and the strengthening of 
Evangelical Lutheran faith. 

Every student of the Theological Seminary is a member. The so- 
ciety has met, during the school year, every other Friday afternoon, 
when programs, consisting of discussions, or lectures by specially in- 
vited speakers, have been rendered. 

THE LYCEUM 
The Lyceum is composed of the three leading literary societies of 
the institution, namely: the Phrenokosmian, the Adelphic, and the 
Concordia. Its general object is to promote the literary interests of 
the institution. The Lyceum publishes "The Augustana Observer." 
During the school-year a lecture course of ten numbers has been suc- 
cessfully carried out. 

SVENSKA VITTERHETSSaLLSKAPET 
This society was organized in the fall of the year 1896 for the study 
of Swedish literature and culture. Its membership is limited to eigh- 
teen, and unanimity is required for election. The society meets once 
a month for literary discussions, reading of essays, criticism, and 
original productions. 

TEGNfiR-FoRBUNDET 
This society was organized April 4, 1901, for the study of Swedish 
literature. Only those students who have a good knowledge of Swedish 



120 GENERAL INFORMATION 

and show interest in the language and literature of Sweden are eligible 
to membership. Meetings are held twice a month. The society pub- 
lishes a monthly, Tomten. 

IDUNA 
The Iduna Society was organized by the members of the Second 
Class Academy, November 21, 1902. The purpose of the society is to 
promote the use of the Swedish language among the younger students. 
All students are eligible to membership. Meetings are held once a 
week. The society publishes a monthly called Iduna. 

OLOV RUDBECK 

This society was organized April 4, 1910, for the study of Swedish 
literature, art and culture. Its membership is limited to twelve and 
unanimity is required for election. Only students who have a good 
knowledge of Swedish and show interest in the language and literature 
of Sweden are eligible. 

The society meets twice a month. Its studies are conducted in the 
manner of a Seminar class under the direction of the professor of the 
Swedish language and literature. 

DEBATING CLUBS 

Besides the above named literary societies, there are the five follow- 
ing debating clubs: 

The Gladstone Debating Club, organized 1893. The membership is 
limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Webster Debating Club, organized in 1902. The membership is 
fimited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Torgny Debating Club, organized in the fall of 1904. This is a 
Swedish debating club. The membership is limited to eighteen. Week- 
ly meetings are held. 

The Balfour Debating Club, organized in 1905. The membership is 
limited to eighteen. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Edward Everett Debating Club, organized in 1913. The mem- 
bership is limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Lincoln Debating Club, organized in 1913. This is an Academy 
Debating Club. The membership is limited to 20. Weekly meetings 
are held. 

THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FORENSICS 
The Board of Control of Forensics, established by the Board of Direc- 
tors upon petition of the Debating League during the past year, has 
charge of all matters pertaining to intercollegiate and interclub de- 
bates. 

Membership of the Board is made up of the President and Treasurer 
of the institution, one member of the Board of Directors, two members 



GENERAL INFORMATION 121 

of the general faculty, and four student members, nominated by the 
several debating clubs and elected by the Debating League. During 
the past year the following have served on this Board: Dr. G. A. 
Andreen and Prof. A. Kempe, ex officio members; Rev. A. F. Bergstrom, 
representing the Board of Directors; Dr. E. F. Bartholomew and Dr. 
C. W. Foss, representing the general faculty; Lael Johnson (Edward 
Everett), Harold R. Lundgren (Gladstone), Leonard Kendall (Balfour), 
Simon Fagerstrom (Webster), representing the Debating League. 

OFFICERS 

President, Dr. G. A. Andreen, 
Secretary, Harold Lundgren, 
Treasurer, Prof. A. Kempe. 

AUGUSTANA DEBATING LEAGUE 
The Debating League consists of the Webster, Balfour, Gladstone 
and Edward Everett debating clubs. It is an advisory body to the 
Debating Board of Control. 

OFFICERS 

President, Gladys Dunleavy, 
Secretary, Helen Reinemund. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING 
Roy Monroe Conrad, B.S., 

DIRECTOR OF GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS 

For the physical training and development of students there is pro- 
vided a moderately well equipped gymnasium. It is well heated and 
lighted, the main floor being the gymnasium proper. In the basement 
there are shower-baths and locker rooms. The locker rooms are well 
equipped with new steel lockers. In this building a systematic course 
of training is pursued, the aim of which is to train the student so that 
every part of the physical being may be well developed. The exercises 
that are given are of such a character that all are able to do them. 
They are as follows: marching, maze running, free hand calisthenics, 
dum bell work, floor work, light apparatus work and games. 

Careful attention is given to the physical condition of the students 
and no one is allowed to engage in any excessive exercise or to attempt 
anything which is likely to be attended with risk. Before entering 
any of the classes each student is required to undergo a physical ex- 
amination by a competent physician. 

For outdoor athletics, Ericson field furnishes ample room for base- 
ball and track and field athletics. On other parts of the campus are 
found tennis courts. 



122 GENERAL INFORMATION 

To meet the requirements in physical training students are required 
to take at least two hours' prescribed exercise per week under the 
direction of the instructor, for which one credit will he given. 

THE AUGUSTANA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 
As a result of a resolution adopted by the Synod at its meeting in 
Rock Island in June, 1910, inter-collegiate athletic relations, except as 
regards football, have been resumed at Augustana College. All inter- 
collegiate games and contests are under the direction of a Board of 
Control, whose duty it is to arrange schedules for games and to en- 
force the eligibility rules of the institution. 

AUGUSTANA PROHIBITION LEAGUE 
This league was organized February 13, 1911, to promote broad and 
practical study of the liquor problem and related social and political 
questions, to advance the principles of prohibition and secure the en- 
listment of students for service and leadership in the overthrow of the 
liquor traffic. This organization is affiliated with the Inter-collegiate 
Prohibition Association but has no connection with any political party. 
It provides several temperance programs during the year and holds a 
local oratorical contest annually, the winner of this contest represent- 
ing Augustana in the State contest. Any student is eligible to mem- 
bership. 

Officers. 

President, Simon Fagerstrom. 

Vice President, Adolph Fant. 

Secretary, Gertrude Jacobson. 

Treasurer, Leonard Kendall. 

Reporters, Robert Olmsted, L. Kendall. 

THE LUTHER BIBLE SOCIETY 
The Luther Bible Society was organized in 1913 for the study of the 
Bible. The membership is limited to eighteen and unanimity is re- 
quired for election. Only students who show that they are interested 
in Bible study are eligible for membership. The society meets every 
Sunday evening at 6 o'clock. The studies are conducted under the 
leadership of the members, each leading in turn. At frequent intervals 
the society endeavors to hold lectures on different phases of Bible 
study, at which times the meetings are open to all. The aim of the 
society is to make its members more interested in Bible study and to 
make them more famaliar with the Bible. The organization fills a long 
felt need and during the past year has been very active. Its officers are: 

Julius Johnson, President. 
Paul Pearson, Vice President. 
Carl A. Anderson, Sec'y Treas. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 123 

AUGUSTANA COLLEGE BAND 
This band was organized in 1874. Students and others who are 
proficient on some band instrument are admitted upon application as 
members. Applications are made to the director, and upon recom- 
mendation candidates are admitted by a two-thirds vote of the band. 
Rehearsals are held every Wednesday afternoon from 4:30 to 6 
o'clock and every Saturday morning from 10:30 to 12, under the di- 
rection of Director Carl H. Kalquist. 

OFFICERS. 

Director, — Carl H. Kalquist 
President — Elmer Swanson 
Vice President — Paul Johnson 
Secretary — Carl Lindahl 
Treasurer — Emil J. Johnson 
Librarian — Erwin Sailer 
Manager — Emil J. Johnson 
Assistant Manager — Martin Trued 

ROSTER. 

Cornets — C. H. Kalquist, Elmer Swanson, Martin Trued, Virgilius 
Ferm, Irving Anderson, Robert Poison, Ferdinand Cederburg, Perry 
Taber. 

Trombones — Clarence Trued, Martin Dahlberg, Herbert Magney, Paul 
Pearson. 

Baritone — Theodore Lenz. 

E-flat Bass — Lowell Kay. 

BB-flat Bass — John Casto, Hugo Gibson. 

B-flat Clarinets — Hjalmar Fryxell, Martin Carlson, Carl Lindahl, Alex- 
ander Elmblad, Luther Kron, Yngve Carlson. 

E-flat Clarinet — Fred Freytag. 

Piccolo — Paul Johnson. 

Saxophones — Erwin Sailer, Arthur T. Johnson. 

Altos — Edgar Johnson, Emil J. Johnson, Hugo Larson, A. B. Dahlgren. 

Drums — C. W. Johnson, Rudolph Hanson. 

THE AUGUSTANA ORCHESTRA 

The object of this organization is to study standard works of the 
older as well as of the more modern composers, giving players who 
possess sufficient command of some orchestral instrument excellent 
opportunities for ensemble practise. Among the more important num- 
bers in the repertoire of the orchestra are the following: 

Symphonies: Haydn's Military and London; Mozart's Jupiter; and 
Beethoven's D major, No. 2. 



124 GENEBAL INFORMATION 

Overtures: Schubert's Rosamunde; Mozart's Die Entfiihrung; Her- 
old's Zampa; Suppe's Poet and Peasant; Rossini's Barber of Seville; 
Nicolai's Merry Wives of Windsor, and Festival Overture. 

Oratorios: Handel's Messiah and Haydn's Creation. 

Advanced students in the vocal or instrumental departments of the 
institution are given the privilege of singing or playing with the 
orchestra at stated intervals during the year. 

Members 
Director — Prof. Algert Anker. 
First Violins — Harry Kalquist, Hulda Peterson, Helga Granere, Leona 

Haywood, Jenny Swanquist, Andora Larrison, Stowell Musson. 
Second Violins — Hjalmar Fryxell, Carl Holmen, Eugene Burton, Esther 

Pihlstrom, Philip Lecata, Veva Marley. 
Violas — Ludvig Mellander, Gust Thiering. 
Cellos — Bessie Friestat, Anna Leaf, Richard Swanson. 
Basses — Steve Ruefer, A. J. Burton. 
Flutes — Hugo Gibson, Paul Johnson. 
Clarinets — L. W. Kling, Martin Carlson. 
Oboe — Joseph Moore. 
Cornets — Martin Trued, Elmer Swanson. 
Horns — Max Giersch, Lawrence Swanson 
Trombones — Martin Dahlberg, Clarence Trued, Clarke Swanson. 

THE AUGUSTANA CHAMBER MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 
The director of the Violin department has organized at the College 
a string quartet, a string trio, and a piano trio for the purpose of study- 
ing the classic masterpieces in the department of chamber music. 
During the year the following compositions have been studied and per- 
formed: 

Trio in C — Piano, violin, and cello Haydn 

String Trio No. 1 Pergolesi 

String Trio No. 5 J. Stamitz 

String Quartet — Selections from Schubert and Bacherini 
Clarinet Quintet Mozart 

THE HANDEL ORATORIO SOCIETY 
In January, 1881, Dr. 0. Olsson gathered together at Augustana Col- 
lege the first oratorio society in this section of the Mississippi Valley, 
having as its object the study and rendering of oratorio works. The 
society then organized has continued in existence, in one form or 
another, till the present time. 

From the founding of the oratorio society to the present day the 
following persons have served as leaders of the chorus: Joseph Osborn, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 125 

P. A. Edquist, Jas. Moody, Dr. G. Stolpe, G. E. Griffith, V. Tengwald, 
A. D. Bodfors, P. E. Peterson, Christian Oelschlagel, Emil Larson, Mrs. 
Edla Lund, and J. Victor Bergquist. Following are some of the works 
rendered: Handel's Messiah, Haydn's Creation, Spohr's Last Judge- 
ment, Gaul's Holy City, Gade's Zion, Bach's God's Time is Best, Cowen's 
Song of Thanksgiving, Stolpe's Reformation Cantata, Wennerberg's 
Psalms of David, and Christmas Oratorio, Parmer's Mass, Mendelssohn's 
Elijah, Stainer's Daughter of Jairus, Bennet's Woman of Samaria, 
Coomb's The Vision of St. John, Patton's Isaiah, Bergquist's Golgotha, 
etc. 

During the present year one concert has been given, December 19th. 
when Handel's Messiah was given assisted by the Moline Choral Union. 
Mrs. Geistweit Benedict, Soprano, Althea Brown, Alto, Edward Walker, 
Tenor, Gustaf Holmquist, Bass, and the College Orchestra. 

Officers 
Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist 
President, Dr. G. A. Andreen 
Vice President, Dr. Otto Bostrom 
Secretary, Olga Larson 
Librarian, Reuben Kron 

Members 

Sopranos — Amy Anderson, Evelyn Anderson, Martha Anderson, Minnie 
Anderson, Ruth Carlson, Olga Edlen, Ruth Eliason, Teckla Hanson, 
Thelma Helquist, Edith Hill, Ethel Johnson, Florence Johnson. 
Mrs. Kraft, Esther Larson, Olga Larson, Mrs. Martin, Ruth Nelson, 
Ruth Olson, Elizabeth Peterson, Esther Peterson, Regina Rosen- 
berg, Mabel Steinman, Etta Setterdahl, Lydia Stenborg, Edna Wil- 
son, Amanda Eastberg, Laura Woodburn. 

Altos — Bertha Ahlquist, Pearl Crone, Bertrude Carlson, Inez Gull, 
Gerda Hiller, Edith Johnson, Esther Johnson, Lael Johnson, Vendla 
Johnson, Ebba Leaf, Louise Kinquist, Esther Nelson, Mabel Peter- 
son, Margaret Searle, Esther Stenborg, Edith Swanson, Florence 
Swanson, Florence Thoren, Hazel Westerlund, Florence Anderson, 
Elsie Collins. 

Tenors — Svante Erling, Vernon Erickson, Aldo Aronson, Carl Freeman, 
Elmer Friedlund, Clarence Granlund, Carl Gustafson, G. W. Henry, 
Eric Heurlin, Alexander Bernstein, Ralph Hult, Hjalmar Jackson, 
C. A. Johnson, Constant Johnson, Luther Lindstrom, Herbert Nord- 
lander, Walter Peterson, Bert Samuelson, Rudolph Swanson, George 
Randolph. 

Bass — Geo. Anselm, A. T. Bergquist, Otto Bostrom, Earl Brodd, C. O. 
Bostrom, F. Cederburg, P. Granquist, Luther Krone, Reuben Kron, 
Arthur Larson, Oscar Johnson, Geo. Engdahl, Theo. Lenz, Albin 



126 GENERAL INFORMATION 

Lindgren, Anders Nelson, Herbert Olander, Reuben Palm, Wilbur 
Palmquist, Arthur Peterson, Paul Pearson, Paul Randolph, Enoch 
Sanden, Joel Seedoff, Lawrence Sodergren, Victor Pearson. 

THE WENNERBERG MALE CHORUS 
This chorus was organized in 1901 and is the Glee club par excellence 
of the institution. Its primary object is the promotion of high-class 
male chorus singing, the repertoire consisting of selections from stand- 
ard Swedish, English and American composers. The chorus has during 
the last few years made annual concert tours thruout the central part 
of the Synod's territory. This year it extended its tour thru parts of 
Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, 
Washington D. C, and Connecticut. 

Officers 
Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist 
President, G. W. Henry 
Vice President, Constant Johnson 
Recording Secretary, Anders W. Nelson 
Treasurer, Hugo E. Gibson 
Manager, Andrew Kempe 
Assistant Manager, Theodore Rydback 
Curator, Hjalmar Bergh 
Accompanist, Martin Dahlberg 

Members 
First Tenors — Hjalmar Bergh, G. W. Henry, Herbert Nordlander, Carl 

Swanson, Karl H. Freeman, Rudolph J. Swanson. 
Second Tenors — Theodore Rydback, Clarence O. Granlund, Constant 

Johnson, Vernon A. Erickson. 
First Basses — Virgilius Perm, Hugo E. Gibson, Joel Seedoff, Elmer T. 

Peterson. 
Second Basses — Paul Randolph, Arthur V. Swedberg, Anders W. Nelson, 

Wilbur N. Palmquist, Emil J. Johnson, Otto H. Bostrom. 

THE CLEF CLUB 
The Clef Club is a musical organization, which is made up largely 
of Conservatory students. It was organized in 1913 and since then it 
has had a rapid growth. Programs are given every Friday afternoon 
at 5 P. M. at the College Chapel to which the public is invited. The 
Clef Club has brought such artists here as Carol Robinson, Hazel Hunt- 
ley, and also local artists. Lectures have been given by Dr. E. F. Bar- 
tholomew, Dr. W. A. Colledge, and dramatic readings by Mr. R. E. 
Pattison Kline of Chicago. 



genebal information 127 

Officers 
President, Hulda Peterson 
Vice President, Elizabeth Olmsted 
Secretary and Treasurer, Helga Granere 

THE ORIOLE CLUB 
This club was organized in 1915 under the direction of Prof. Arvid 
Samuelson and fills a long felt want among the ladies. They have as 
their object the procuring of a new pipe organ for Augustana. This 
year several concerts were given in neighboring places. 

Officers 
Director, Prof. Arvid Samuelson 
President, Althea Brown 
Vice President, Ruth Nelson 
Secretary-Treasurer, Inez Gull 
Business Manager, Olga Larson 
Librarian, Helga Granere 
Accompanist, Le Roy Carlson 

Members 
Martha Anderson, Mildred Blomgren, Althea M. Brown, Ruth Carl- 
mark, Olga Edlen, Ruth Eliason, Helga Granere, Inez Gull, Edith Hill, 
Leona Haywood, Edith Johnson, Olga Larson, Myrtle Larson, Juliet 
McElvain, Freda Mattsen, Ruth Nelson, Helen Parker, Esther Petterson, 
Hazel Westerlund, Edna Wilson. 

THE ENDOWMENT FUND SOCIETY 
The Augustana College and Theological Seminary Endowment Fund 
Society was organized in the spring of 1894, and chartered by the State 
of Illinois. Its object, as its name implies, is to secure endowments 
for this institution. Its active members are, for the most part, ladies 
living in Rock Island and Moline, tho any lady paying the sum of 
$1.20 annually and subscribing to the society's constitution is elegible 
to membership. Its honorary members pay one dollar annually or 
ten dollars at one time for life membership and are found in almost 
every part of the Synod. All moneys secured by the society are con- 
scientiously cared for, and invested and loaned out on first class secu- 
rities only. 

The society has received a number of substantial gifts from various 
sources, but the greater part of its funds is made up of membership 
fees, and now, at the close of its twenty-third fiscal year, it has to its 
credit the sum of $9,727.83. 



128 GENERAL INFORMATION 

While pursuing its original object of gathering an endowment, the 
society has endeavored to maintain a social standing and a level of 
culture in keeping with the dignity of such an organization. 

For a number of years informal programs have been given at the 
meetings, while ten years ago its first year-book was published, giving 
programs with topics and dates of meetings, hostesses for each, together 
with other information valuable to the society. Since then the year- 
book has been issued regularly and has contributed much toward the 
permanency and development of the society. 

Contributions, donations, and bequests are hereby solicited. They 
should be sent to the General Treasurer, Mrs. Mauritz Johnson, 1439 
Thirteenth Street, Moline, 111. 

The present officers are: President, Mrs. C. W. Foss, Vice President, 
Mrs. L. G. Abrahamson, Recording Secretary, Mrs. A. R. Wallin, Corres- 
ponding Secretary, Mrs. O. V. Holmgrain, Treasurer, Miss Etta Setter- 
dahl, General Treasurer, Mrs. Mauritz Johnson, Organizer of Auxiliary 
Societies, Prof. A. Kempe, Auditing Committee: Miss Josephine Peetz, 
Mrs. Geo. W. Johnson, Mrs. Algert Anker, Year-Book Committee: Mrs. 
E. T. Anderson, Mrs. Wm. Gamble, Miss Flora Abrahamson, Nominat- 
ing Committee: Mrs. C. G. Thulin, Mrs. Axel Stock, Mrs. H. L. Becker. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
The Alumni Association of Augustana College was organized by the 
first graduating class of the College in the spring of 1877. With a very 
few exceptions all the alumni are enrolled as members. Its objects 
are promoting of literary and scientific culture, especially in the halls 
of Alma Mater, the reunion of early friends and colaborers in literary 
pursuits, and the revival of the pleasant associations that entwine 
themselves about student life. The association holds its annual meet- 
ing on Commencement day. 

Some five years ago the Association began the work of soliciting 
contributions among the members toward a fund to be known as the 
Alumni Scholarship Fund. Approximately one in ten of the alumni 
have responded so far, and the fund is now about $700, with pledges 
aggregating $100 still to be redeemed. When the fund shall have 
reached $1,000, the interest will be available for the promotion of 
scholarship at Augustana. 

Officers 
President, Grant Hultberg 
First Vice President, Rev. J. N. Brandelle 
Second Vice President, Dr. J. Westerlund 
Third Vice President, Prof. A. R. Wallin 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. K. T. Anderson 
Treasurer, Carl Londberg. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 129 

THE STUDENTS' AID FUND OF AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This fund has recently been established by the Synod to aid needy 
students who are preparing for the ministry. Applications for aid may 
be handed in at any time to the committee which has charge of this 
fund. The committee is appointed by the Synod and consists of the 
professors of the Theological Seminary and four professors from the 
College. 
The following rules have been adopted by the committee: 
Art. I. Regular students in the Theological Seminary, also regular 
students in the Academy or in the College, who are preparing for the 
ministry and who are in need, may receive aid from this fund, but a 
student in the Academy or College in order to receive aid: 

a) Must have pursued studies one school-year at the institution with 
marked intelligence and good deportment. 

b) Must present to the committee a written testimonial from his 
pastor as to his character and Christian life. 

c) Must have in view entering the Theological Seminary after grad- 
uation from the College. 

Art. II. a) The amounts paid shall not exceed £en dollars per 
month to each student, and $90 shall be the limit of loans granted 
during any 24 months to any one student. 

b) A beneficiary student of this fund shall upon the completion of 
his Seminary course, or if he decides to enter some other profession, 
then immediately and in any case before he leaves the institution, give 
a note covering the full amount of aid received by him from this fund; 
such note to be payable to the Students' Aid Fund, and bearing interest 
at the rate of 2 per cent, the first year, 3 per cent, the second year, 
4 per cent, the third year, 6 per cent, for subsequent years after date, 
All notes become due 3 years after the ordination of the beneficiary. 

Art. III. Donations to this fund of one hundred dollars or larger 
amounts shall be deposited in a Savings Bank as a permanent fund of 
which the interest alone may be used. 

Art. IV. Additions or amendments to these rules may be made by 
a unanimous vote of the entire committee in charge of the Students' 
Aid Fund. 

THE MRS. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 
In memory of his wife Johanna Charlotta, who died January 30, 
1909, Professor Dr. N. Forsander has donated to Augustana College 
and Theological Seminary the sum of one thousand dollars to be 
known as the Mrs. N. Forsander Scholarship. The annual proceeds of 
this fund shall be given to some student of this Theological Seminary, 

College Catalog 9 



130 GENERAL INFORMATION 

who is well known as an earnest Christian both in faith and life, as 
a diligent student especially in Church History, and as having gifts 
for ministerial work. 



THE O. H. THORSTENBERG SCHOLARSHIP 
Mr. 0. H. Thorstenberg of Assaria, Kansas, donated by will one 
thousand dollars to the institution to establish a scholarship, the an- 
nual income of which is to be used to assist some worthy student, 
male or female, who intends to serve the Church as pastor, teacher or 
organist. 

THE ANNA WESTMAN STIPEND 

On February 10, 1911, the sum of fifty dollars was received by the 
College faculty, accompanied by a communication from a lady who 
wished no public mention to be made of her name, stating that she 
obligated herself "to donate annually, for an indefinite period of years, 
a sum of money to be used as a benefit to one or more deserving, 
industrious lady students pursuing studies in the Collegiate depart- 
ment of Augustana College, the beneficiaries to be chosen by a com- 
mittee of the College faculty. 

It was further stated that "this fund shall be known as the 'Anna 
Westman Stipend,' being given as an appreciative memorial to Miss 
Westman, who was the friend and helper of young women struggling, 
like herself, to obtain a college education," and further, that "this 
fund shall be announced annually on January 7th, the date of Miss 
Westman's birth, or as soon thereafter as is possible." 

Miss Anna Westman was graduated from Augustana College in 1892, 
and was instructor in Mathematics at the institution for two years. 
She died in Cleveland, Ohio, August 1, 1910. 

THE CLASS OP '85 SCHOLARSHIP 

A scholarship was established in the spring of 1911 by the alumni 
of the class of 1885, subject to the following regulations: 

Art. I. Name: — This scholarship shall be known as the Class of '85 
Scholarship. 

Art II. Purpose: — This scholarship is an expression of love and 
gratitude to the Alma Mater from the members of the class of '85, and 
its purpose is to encourage and aid the cause of higher education at 
Augustana. 

Art. III. Value: — This scholarship shall have a face value of not 
less than $1,000.00, and shall yield an annual income of not less than 
$50.00, to be available in two installments, one at the end of each of 
the two terms of the school-year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 131 

Art IV. Provisions: — This scholarship shall be conferred by the 
College faculty upon: 
Sec. 1. A member of the Freshman class of Augustana College, 
Sec. 2. Whose deportment and diligence are approved by the faculty, 
Sec. 3. Whose average standing in all required subjects of any 
course of the Freshman year shall be the highest. 

Sec. 4. The faculty may for any cause withhold the scholarship, or 
confer it upon a student who does not fulfill the requirements of Sec- 
tions 1 — 3 of this article. 

THE DR. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 
A sum of thirteen hundred dollars ($1,300) has been collected by Dr. 
N. Forsander from among his personal friends for the purpose of 
establishing a scholarship at Augustana College and Theological Sem- 
inary, named by the Board of Directors the Dr. N. Forsander Scholar- 
ship. The annual income of this scholarship shall be given to some 
student of this Theological Seminary, who is well known as an earnest 
Christian, who is faithful and diligent in his studies, and who has gifts 
fitting him for the holy ministry, preference being given to one who 
intends to devote himself to the work of foreign missions. The bene- 
ficiary of this fund shall be appointed by the Theological faculty. 

THE SEMINARY DORMITORY FUND 
The sum of $1,000 was on Sept. 11, 1912 donated to the Institution 
by Dr. N. Forsander, which amount together with the interest is to be 
used for a dormitory for students of The Theological Seminary. With 
the interest this fund now amounts to $1,109.98. 

LOCATION AND BUILDINGS 
Rock Island, a city of about twenty-five thousand inhabitants, is 
beautifully located on the banks of the Mississippi River. The bold 
bluffs on the Illinois side of the river here recede to a distance of 
about a mile, leaving a beautiful and gently rising plain, upon which 
the city is built. In beauty of scenery, healthfulness of location and 
climate, Rock Island stands foremost among Illinois towns. Three 
great lines of railroads, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific, the Chi- 
cago, Burlington and Quincy, and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, 
center here, rendering the city easy of access from all parts of the 
country. The institution is situated in the eastern part of the city 
near the base of a prominent bluff, from which the view is both strik- 
ing and picturesque. Opposite lies the city of Davenport, Iowa, com- 
mandingly located on the bluffs which rise almost directly from the 
river. To the east the eye rests on the tall chimneys of the busy city 
of Moline, rendered famous by her manufacturers. Directly in front 



132 GENEBAL INFORMATION 

of the College grounds, in the middle of the river, is the government 
island of Rock Island, containing over nine hundred acres of land upon 
which the government's largest arsenal is built. On the lower end of 
the island rests the iron railroad and wagon bridge which spans the 
river at this point, thus rendering Davenport easily accessible. 

The grounds of the institution consist of about thirty-six acres of 
land. One of the street car lines, extending from the business parts 
of Rock Island to those of Moline and passing by all the passenger 
depots of both cities, also passes by the corner of the College grounds 
on 7th Ave. and 38th St. 

The following buildings, belonging to the institution, are located on 
the grounds: 

The New College Building, occupied since February, 1888, is located 
near the center of the grounds, fronting Seventh avenue. It is a stone 
structure of the pure Renaissance style. The basement and the first 
floor are devoted to the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Col- 
legiate and Academic Departments, and faculty rooms. The second 
floor contains the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Theological 
Department, Cable Hall, and the Chapel, which occupies two stories in 
the east end of the building. The third floor is given to the Art De- 
partment, Biological laboratory and recitation rooms. 

The Denkmann Memorial Library, the corner stone of which was 
laid Jan. 21, 1910, and which was dedicated May 31, 1911, is the gift 
to the institution of the sons and daughters of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Fredrick C. A. Denkmann of Rock Island. The names of these generous 
donors are: Mrs. Marie Antoniette Reimers, Mrs. Apollonia Adelaide 
Davis, Mrs. Elsie Augusta Marshall, Mrs. Catherine Wentworth, Mrs. 
Susanne C. Hauberg, Mr. Edward P. Denkmann and Mr. Fredrick C. 
Denkmann. The building, located in the northwestern part of the 
campus, is a magnificant structure of marble-like stone, with the most 
sumptuous interior appointments. The ground floor contains a lecture 
room, a memorial hall, administration offices, etc. The second floor 
contains the great main reading room, extending across the whole 
front, 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. On the third floor is a large room 
set apart for the Museum. The rear of the building contains stack- 
rooms for 100,000 volumes, librarian's office, seminar rooms, waiting 
rooms, etc. 

The Old College Building, occupied since 1875, is a large brick struc- 
ture situated on Seventh avenue, east of the New building. It is de- 
voted principally to students' rooms, the household department, and 
class-rooms of the Commercial department. 

The New Gymnasium Building is one story and basement, brick and 
steel construction, size 90 by 140 feet. The dressing rooms with ample 
locker facilities, a swimming pool 60 by 25 and a large store room are 



GENERAL INFORMATION 133 

located in the basement. The main assembly hall together with the 
balcony seats 2,000. Above the balcony a first class running track, 
14% laps to the mile with cork carpet, is constructed. The gymnasium 
is equipped with new and ample paraphernalia. For concert purposes 
there is a stage which seats two hundred people and a first class pipe 
organ is also installed. 

The Ladies' Hall, a large brick structure, is located near the eastern 
side of the grounds. On the ground floor suitable rooms are used by 
the School of Music as practice rooms. 

Ericson Hall, a brick building, is located in Ericson Park. It is at 
present used for the Chemical and Physical laboratories. 

Besides the above there are two frame buildings located on Thirty- 
fifth street and used as residences. 

THE CHARTER 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, rep- 
resented in the General Assembly, That Erland Carlsson, T. N. Hassel- 
quist, Carl Johan P. Peterson, Ole Anderson, Iver Lawson, John Amond- 
son, Carl Stromberg, John Field, and their successors in office, to be 
elected as hereinafter provided, be and are hereby constituted a body 
corporate and politic, under the name and style of the Augustana Col- 
lege and Theological Seminary, and by that name and style shall have 
perpetual succession with power to sue and be sued, implead and be 
impleaded, and shall be capable in law of taking and holding by gift 
or grant, devise, or otherwise, and of purchasing and holding, and con- 
veying, both in law and equity, any estate or interest therein, real, 
personal or mixed, and shall have power to execute and fulfill all such 
trusts as may be confided in said corporation, and take, hold, use, 
manage, lease, and dispose of all such trust property that may in any 
manner come to said corporation, charged with any trust or trusts in 
conformity therewith; to have and to use a common seal, and to alter 
same at pleasure. 

Sec. 2. Said corporation shall have power to establish and maintain 
in or near the town of Paxton, Ford Co., Illinois, or any other suitable 
place within the State of Illinois, a college and theological seminary 
under the patronage and control of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lu- 
theran Augustana Synod in North America. And the persons herein 
before mentioned as incorporators shall constitute the first board of 
trustees, or directors. Their successors shall also be chosen, and the 
institution be governed by the said Augustana Synod, as provided for 
by the Constitution of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augus- 
tana Seminary already enacted by said Synod; which Constitution the 
Synod shall have power to amend or alter as the needs and develop- 
ment of the institution may require; Provided always, that such amend- 



134 GENERAL INFORMATION 

ments or alterations, or by-laws, which the Synod may enact, shall he 
made in conformity with the Constitution of said Synod, and not in- 
consistent with the Constitution and laws of the State of Illinois. 

Sec. 3. It is also provided that the trusteen or directors shall re- 
spectively hold their office until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. 

Sec. 4. In case of vacancy in the board of trustees or directors, by 
death or otherwise, between the meetings of the Synod, the said board 
may, by ballot, fill such vacancy, by the election of a person or persons 
of the Lutheran Church, and such a person or persons so elected, shall 
hold their office until the next meeting of the Augustana Synod, when 
such vacancy shall be filled by the Synod. 

Sec. 5. In case any of the trustees or directors should, at any time, 
cease to be members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, they shall 
thenceforth cease to be trustees, and their place may be filled in the 
manner specified in section four. 

Sec. 6. The board of trustees or directors shall have power also to 
confer the usual degree of Doctor of Divinity, Master of Arts, Bachelor 
or Arts, or any other Literary or Scientific degrees, on such person or 
persons as they may deem entitled thereto, on the recommendation of 
the faculty. 

Sec. 7. The doctrines taught in the Seminary department of said 
institution shall conform to and be in harmony with the doctrines held 
and maintained by the Augustana Synod as defined in article two of 
the Constitution of said Synod, in the following words, to wit, "As a 
Christian body in general, particularly as an Evangelical Lutheran, this 
Synod acknowledges that the Holy Scriptures, the revealed word of 
God, are the only sufficient and infallible rule and standard of faith 
and practice, and also retains and confesses not only the three oldest 
symbols (the Apostolic, the Nicene, and the Athanasian), but also the 
unaltered Augsburg Confession, as a short and correct summary of the 
principal Christian doctrines as understood and explained in the other 
symbolical books of the Lutheran Church." Any deviation by the pro- 
fessors and teachers from the doctrinal standard shall be deemed suf- 
ficient cause to be dealt with as described in Art. 6 of the Constitution 
of the Seminary, adopted at the Synodical meeting in Clinton, Wis- 
consin, June 5th to 11th, A. D. 1860. 

Sec. 8. The property of said corporation, both real and personal, not 
exceeding the value of One Hundred Thousand Dollars, shall forever 
remain free from taxation. 

Sec. 9. This act to take effect and be in force from and after its 
passage, and to be deemed a public act. Approved Feb. 16th, 1865, and 
amended March 10th, 1869. 

Vide Private Laws of the State of Illinois, Vol 1 (1865), page 21, 
also Vol. 1 (1869), page $7. 



GENERAL, INFORMATION 135 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

Nearly three hundred years ago Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden con- 
ceived the idea of establishing a Swedish colony in the New World. 
His heroic death at Lutzen in 1632 seemed to put an end to his plans, 
but his daughter Queen Christina with the advice of the great states- 
man Oxenstjerna sought to realize the hopes of the dead king. In 
1637 Swedish colonists, "the Pilgrim Fathers of the North", sailed from 
Gothenburg to America in two ships (Kalmar Nyckel and Fogel Grip), 
which arrived at the Delaware River in the middle of March 1638. 
Fort Christina was founded and, during the years immediately follow- 
ing, settlements were made at Philadelphia, Wilmington and other 
neighboring places. From the first, Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
churches were founded, the first clergyman being R. Torkillus from 
Skara and Gothenburg. The colonists dealt with the Indians in a 
friendly and fair spirit and won their confidence. The first missionary 
among the Indians in America was Johannes Campanius during the 
years 1643 — 1648, who began his work even before John Eliot of Massa- 
chusetts went forth as missionary among the aborigines. Campanius 
learned the language of the Indians and translated Luther's catechism, 
with explanations, into their tongue, a copy of which translation is 
found in the library of Augustana College and Theological Seminary. 

The descendants of these Swedish colonists took part in the Revo- 
lutionary war and in the forming of the government of the United 
States. One of these, John Morton, cast the decisive vote by which 
Pennsylvania in the Continental Congress joined the other colonies in 
the declaration of Independence and was one of the signers of that act. 
Another descendant of these pilgrim Swedes was John Hanson, the 
first president of Congress under the Constitution of 1789. The chil- 
dren of these colonies have taken active part in the upbuilding of their 
states. The virtual founder of Pennsylvania University was Charles 
Stille, a colonial Swede, and some of the chancellors have claimed Swe- 
dish colonial descent. 

The great tide of emigration from Northern continental Europe did 
not begin, however, till the years between 1840 and 1850. The pioneers 
who then came made their way mainly to the northern Mississippi 
valley, founding their homes in the large unsettled tracts of northern 
Illinois and Iowa, later in Wisconsin, Minnesota and other states. 
These immigrants had been members of the Lutheran Church in the 
mother country, and were as a rule a religious and churchly people, 
wishing to retain their religious heritage on the new soil. Earnest, 
pious men came over as pastors, and Lutheran congregations were 
early established among the Swedes and Norwegians. At the organi- 
zation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Northern Illinois in 1851, 
several Scandinavian pastors were present and took part in the organi- 



136 GENERAL INFORMATION 

zation. The scattered Scandinavian and American Lutherans in this 
section of the country were thus joined in one Synod. The Scandi- 
navians increased rapidly and before 1860 they constituted about one- 
half of the Synod, and formed three separate conferences. This Synod 
and other Lutheran bodies in the West established a school, known 
as the Illinois State University, at Springfield, 111., for the special 
purpose of educating Lutheran ministers. At a meeting of the Synod 
in 1855, the question of establishing a Scandinavian professorship at 
the University was favorably considered, and at a subsequent meeting 
a resolution to establish such a professorship was adopted, and Rev. 
L. P. Esbjorn, the first of the pioneer pastors, was elected to the chair. 
He entered upon his duties in the fall of 1858, and served two years, 
having among his pupils (in the subject of mathematics) the son of 
Abraham Lincoln, who sometimes consulted with Esbjorn concerning 
his son's studies. Prof Esbjorn resigned this professorship in the 
spring of 1860. Differences with regard to the doctrinal basis of the 
Synod existed from the beginning between the Scandinavians and 
American members. Professor Esbjorn's resignation brought matters 
to a crisis. The Scandinavians met in convention in Chicago, 111., 
April 23 — 27, 1860, and after long deliberation unanimously resolved 
on April 27 (which date is therefore celebrated at Augustana as Found- 
ers' day) to organize a synod for themselves, and to establish a theo- 
logical Seminary of their own. The organization of the Synod, which 
was to be known as the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augustana 
Synod, was completed at a subsequent convention held at Jefferson 
Prairie, near Clinton, Wis., June 5 — 11 the same year. It is to these 
meetings that Augustana College and Theological Seminary traces its 
origin. It was for three years located at Chicago, the instruction 
mainly being given in the old church then located on Superior St., be- 
tween Wells and La Salle streets. 

These were years of harship for the young institution. The call of 
Abraham Lincoln for volunteers in the Civil war was heeded by some 
of the students and by many who otherwise would have become stu- 
dents of Augustana, two of the sons of president Esbjorn enlisting in 
the army. In 1863, when Prof. Esbjorn resigned, the institution was 
moved to Paxton, 111., where Prof. T. N. Hasselquist became its head, 
which position he retained till his death in 1891. The institution was 
incorporated under the laws of Illinois in 1863 and named Augustana 
College and Seminary and afterward by a special act of the legislature 
in 1865, a charter was granted which was amended by a supplementary 
act by the same body in 1869, since which time the institution has been 
known by its present name. 

Instruction was given both in Seminary and College subjects from 
the very beginning, and college classes were formed as early as 1866. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 137 

Every year from 1861 students were sent forth from the theological 
Seminary to enter the work of the ministry of the Augustana Synod, 
being able to supply only in part the ever growing needs of the Church. 
The first graduating class from the College department received the 
degree of A. B. in 1877, since which time this has been an ever growing 
department of the institution. 

In 1887 the Conservatory of Music was added, and the following year 
a Business Department was organized. The Normal Department was 
established in 1891. In connection with the Conservatory of Music a 
School of Art was established by the Board of Directors in 1895. 

The original plan of the Seminary was to have at least three pro- 
fessors, one for each of the leading languages used — Swedish, Nor- 
wegian, and English. This plan was not fully realized until 1868, when 
Rev. S. L. Harkey was elected to the chair of the English language and 
Rev. A. Wenaas to that of the Norwegian. The whole plan, however, 
was completely changed in 1870, when the Norwegians withdrew and 
organized a separate synod and established an institution of their own. 

The courses of instruction in the Theological Seminary were gradu- 
ally made to embrace two years, and from 1874 there were two regular 
classes in the Seminary until 1890, when the university plan was 
adopted, and the instruction was arranged in distinct and independent 
courses. This plan was approved by the Synod in 1891. The number of 
courses was first fourteen, but has since increased to twenty. Ten 
departments of instruction have gradually been established in the 
College proper, viz.: Swedish, English and Philosophy, Latin, Greek, 
Modern Languages, Christianity, History and Political Science, Biology 
and Geology, Physics and Chemistry, and Mathematics and Astronomy. 

Swedish and English were provided for in the original plan. Around 
the Swedish chair clustered Christianity, German, and the Classics; 
and around the English chair, History, Philosophy, Mathematics, and 
the Sciences. As a rule these subjects were taught in the language 
around which they were grouped. Latin and Swedish were for many 
years taught by the same professor, but in 1883 Latin was made a 
separate chair, and Swedish and Christianity were united into one 
chair and taught by two professors, one in the College proper and one 
in the Preparatory Department. In 1890 both these professors re- 
signed, and the two subjects were separated into distinct departments. 
Greek and German were likewise united in one chair for a number of 
years, but in 1887 the chair of Modern Languages was established and 
German was assigned to it. Greek thus became a separate chair. 
Mathematics and Natural Science were separated in 1881. The latter 
was further separated into the chair of Biology and Geology and that 
of Physics and Chemistry in 1888. The chair of History and Political 
Science was established in 1884. During the last decade all subjects 



138 GENERAL INFORMATION 

in the College and Academy are taught in English, except the Swedish 
language and literature. Both of these departments belong to the 
North Central Association and as a first class American College fulfill 
the high requirements of this Association. In the Theological Sem- 
inary the instruction is given by means of both English and Swedish, 
as the pastor in our Synod needs to master both these languages. 

The institution as a whole has always been open to students of good 
moral character, without regard to language, race, nationality, or creed. 
Lady students were allowed to attend instruction in the various classes, 
but were not matriculated until 1886. Of the students in the Theo- 
logical Seminary, 825 have been ordained to the holy ministry. In 
the Collegiate Department 602 have graduated with the degree of A. B., 
and 40 with the degree of B. S. The Commercial Department numbers 
1,027 graduates, the Conservatory of Music 153, and the Normal School 
37. The graduates of the present year are not included in any of the 
above figures. 

The first president of the institution was Prof. L. P. Esbjorn, who 
served during the first three years. When the institution was removed 
to Paxton, in 1863, Dr. T. N. Hasselquist, who had just accepted a call 
to the new congregation at that place, was appointed to take charge 
of the school until a permanent professor and president could be se- 
cured. The position, however, became permanent, and he served as 
president until his death in 1891. 

Dr. O. Olsson was elected to succeed him. His death occurred on 
May 12, 1900. 

Dr. C. W. Foss served as Acting President until the summer of 1901, 
when Dr. Gustav Andreen, of Yale University, was elected to the 
presidency. 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



189 



Graduates, Decrees and 
Diplomas, 1916 



BACHELOB OF 

Gustav Knut Andeen 
Thure "Valdemar Anderson 
John Billdt 
Efraim Ceder 
Paul David Engstrand 
William Robert Frendberg 
Oscar Otto Gustafson 
Sigurd Linne Hanson 
Aron Theodore Johnson Hjerpe 
Joseph Walton Kempe 
Arthur William Knock 
Anton Mander Lundeen 
Carl Samuel Odell 
Carl Hjalmar Olson 
Hjalmar Rudolf Peterson 
David Verner Swanson 
Rev. Haldor Thorsen 



DIVINITY 

Attleboro, Mass. 
Kenoro, Ont., Canada 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Leonardville, Kans. 
Grassflat, Pa. 
Funk, Nebr. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Dorchester, Mass. 
Red Oak, Iowa 
St. Peter, Minn. 
Newman Grove, Nebr. 
Kansas City, Kans. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
St. Peter, Minn. 
Axtell, Nebr. 
Calgary, Alta, Canada 



GRADUATES WITH THE S. 

Carl Emil Bergquist 

Otto Theodor Eklund 

William Albert Ericson 

Hugo Benjamin Haterius 

Martin Luther Lawrence Swanson 

George Martin Thimell 

Walter August Tilberg 



M. DEGREE 

New Britain, Conn. 

Mediapolis, Iowa 

Lindsborg, Kans. 

Olivia, Texas 

North Easton, Mass. 

Rockford 

Dwight, Kans. 



HOSPITANT8 



Gustav Gottfred Carlson 
John Parson Warner 
Abraham Wattman 
Erick August Bongfeldt 



Spokane, Wash. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Roseau, Minn. 
Hopkins, Minn. 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Isidor John Broman Rock Island 



140 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



BACHELOR OF ABT8 

Hildegarde Maria Anderson 

Martin Theodore Anderson 

Adolph Martin Benson 

Elmer Bernhard Benson 

Adolph Theodore Bergquist 

Swanhild Anna Margareta Blomgren 

Karl Johan Broholm 

Charles Hillier Cords 

Greta Marie Curry 

Eleanor Dorothy Dahlen 

Gladys Mae Dunleavy 

Carl George Engdahl 

Knut Eric Erickson 

Virgilius Thure Anselm Ferm 

Hugo Emanuel Gibson 

Clarence Oscar Granlund 

Delia Ruth Harris 

Henning Adolph Hill 

Ethel Linnea Isaacson 

Carl Peter Constant Johnson 

Thorsten Ludvig Johnson 

Arthur Anders Levin 

Alvin Leonard Lugn 

John Wilbert Lundahl 

Alvin Daniel Mattson 

Geneva Craig McKeag 

Hazel Jeanette McKeag 

Gustav Edwin Nelson 

George Olson 

Oliver Leonard Olson 

Rudolph Ludvig John Olson 

Vera Jane Palm 

Johan Pearson 

Elmere Nathaniel Petersen 

Helen Louise Reinemund 

Theodore Luther Rydback 

Victoria Swanbeck 

Eva Caroline Swanson 

Edwin Johnson Vikman 



Rock Island 
Madrid, Iowa 
Voxtorp, Sweden 
Rock Island 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Rock Island 
Skagern, Sweden 
Coal Valley 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Titusville, Pa. 
Aurora 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Marquette, Mich. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Keokuk, Iowa 
Marquette, Mich. 
Mediapolis, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Manson, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Eau Claire, Wis. 
Hancock, Mich. 
Moline 

Malvern, Iowa 
Ludington, Mich. 
Lockport 

Big Rapids, Mich. 
Muscatine, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Swea City, Iowa 
Geneseo 
Rockford 



ROLL OP STUDENTS 

GRADUATES OF THE CONSERVATORY 



141 



PIANO 

Diploma 
Lola May Barker 
Leon Walter Jelinek 
Wava Catholine Lindstrom 
Helen Isabel Parker 
Daisy Lorina Strand 
Rosalie Cornelia Tragordh 

Certificate 
Gertrude Kathryn Gabelman 
Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 
Edith Emelia Olson 



Maquoketa, Iowa 
Crete, Nebr. 
Sherrard 
Rock Island 
Dayton, Iowa 
Princeton 

Davenport, Iowa 

Milan 

Salt Lake City, Utah 



ORGAN 

Postgraduate Diploma 
Helen Isabel Parker Rock Island 



Diploma 
Ethel Genevieve Bengston 
Amy Elvira Granlund 

VOICE 

Effie Charlotte Johnson 
Esther Euphemia Lindell 

VIOLIN 

Diploma 
Helen Florence Irene Peterson 
Hulda Eunice Peterson 



Certificate 



Mabel Eugenia Bohman 



Oakland, Nebr. 
Rock Island 



Du Bois, Pa. 
Rockford 



Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Rock Island 



Rock Island 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 



Sigrid Eleanor Bengtson 
Ruth Elizabeth Johnson 



EXPRESSION 



Gladys Mae Dunleavy 
Edythe Frostrom 
Elva Lorena Hoag 
Alma Louise Johnson 



Paul Seitz 

Alma Louise Johnson 



ART 



Ludington, Mich. 
Moscow, Idaho 



Rock Island 
Bristow, Nebr. 
Battle Creek, Mich. 
Moscow, Idaho 



Rock Island 
Moscow, Idaho 



142 ROLL OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATES OF THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTS 

Reeffe Charles Crakes Kendall, Mich. 

Rudolph John Erickson Negaunee, Mich. 



GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT 



Everett Magnus Anderson 
Warren Spencer Bengston 
Oscar Edwin Emanuel Blick 
Carl Edwin Blomdahl 
George Chase 
Elin Albertina Eng 
Joseph Theodore Faust 
George Palm 

Walter Carl Edward Spencer 
Richard Albin Wyman 



CERTIFICATE 

In Bookkeeping 



Glen Samuelson 



In Shorthand 



Winifred Abbott 
Herbert W. Berglund 
Grace Hildegard Borg 
Beata Eberhardt 
Rudolph Englund 
Agnes Ericson 
Asynja Esbjorn 
Dora Harshack 
Carmin V. Hill 
Ethel W. Johnson 
Hazel Balch Kerr 
Beatrice Linshield 
Florence A. Long 
Theresa I. McFadden 
Agnes McGinnis 
Nellie A. Nelson 
Earle Olson 
Florence O'Niel 
Florence O. Peterson 
Goldie Alice Peterson 
Naomi D. Peterson 
Pearl Rose 



Center Sta., Rock Island 

Rock Island 

New Windsor 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Moline 

Jennings, Mich. 

Moline 

Ludington, Mich. 

Portville, N. Y. 

Moline 



03CO 



Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Hampton 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Galesburg 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Galva 

Moline 

Ft. Dodge, Iowa 

Moline 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



143 



Esther Storbech 
Joseph Sundell 
Rudolph Swanson 
Eva Swedberg 
Rudolph Erickson 
Maia Jurgemeyer 
Alice Souter 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Boone, Iowa 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Negaunee, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Moline 



144 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Roll of Students, 1917 



THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



POSTGRADUATES 

Candidates for the degree Sacra? Theologian Doctor 

Rev. O. M. Norlie, A.B., B.D., C.S.T. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. J. H. Ford, A.B., B.D., C.S.T. Parkers Prarie, Minn. 

Has completed the course. 

Candidates for the degree Candidatus Sacrw Theologian, C.S.T. 
Rev. Emil Gottfrid Chinlund, A.B., B.D. Omaha, Nebr. 

Has completed courses 13, 21, 24, 17, 5, Major 2; 3, Minor 3. 
Rev. H. D. Hoover, Ph.D., Pres. Carthage College Carthage, 111. 



Rev. Adolf A. Wilfrid, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. V. E. Holmstedt, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. H. E. Sandstedt, A.B., B.D. 

Has completed courses 1, Minor; 5, Major 2 
Rev. Anton Linder, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. E. P. Karleen, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. N. A. Nelson, A.B., B.D. 

Has completed all the courses. 
Rev. E. W. Magnusson, A.B, B.D. 
Rev. Jno. E. Oslund, A.B., B.D. 

Has completed course 2, Minor 1; 11, Minor 2 
Rev. Axel C. Anderson, A.B., B.D. 

Has completed course 4, Major 1; 2, Minor 2. 
Rev. Waldo C. Ekeberg, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. Gustave Carlson, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. Edwin Olmon, A.B., B.D. 
Rev. Ture V. Anderson, A.B., B.D. 



Mount Jewett, Pa. 
Manhattan, Kans. 
Portland, Ore. 
Minor 1. 

Bradford, Pa. 
Sioux City, la. 
Osceola, Nebr. 

Geneseo 

Center City, Minn. 

North Easton, Mass. 

Peoria 

Gardner, Mass. 
Saskatchewan, Can. 
Missoula, Mont. 



Candidates for the degree Divinitatis Baccalaureus 
Rev. Haldor Thorsen, A.B. Tacoma, Wash. 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. B. A. Olsen, A.B. Seneca 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. A. W. Tilberg, A.B. Moline 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. A. M. Knudsen, A.B. Boulder, Colo. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Rev. H. T. Egedahl, A.B. 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. C. C. A. Jensen, A.B. 

Has completed the course. 
Rev. Olof Holen, A.B. 

Has completed the course. 



145 
Monitor, Alta., Can. 

Clear Lake, Iowa 

Tacoma, Wash. 



REGULAR STUDENTS 



SENIOR CLASS 



Svante Anderson Erling 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Frank Gustav Granquist 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Henry George Hanson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Gustaf Wilhelm Henry 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Ralph Daniel Hult 

A.B., Augustana College, 1913 
Karl Johansson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Carl Arthur Johnson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Henning Leonard Johnson 

A.B., Upsala College, 1914 
Carl Anderson Julius 

A.B., Bethany College, 1914 
Johan Alfred Lundgren 

A.B., Upsala College, 1909 
Arthur Eugene Olson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Victor Rosenius Pearson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Arthur Lawrence Peterson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1913 
Herbert Carl Morton Swanson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1913 
Bert Martin Samuelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1910 
Lawrence Joseph Sodergren 

A.B., Bethany College, 1913 
Levin Julius Trued 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 



Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Kearney, Nebr. 
Batavia 
Weston, Nebr. 
Lanse, Pa. 
Lindsborg, Kans. 
Kane, Pa. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Bertrand, Nebr. 
Hepburn, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Ceresco, Nebr. 



College Catalog 10 



146 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



MIDDLE CLASS 

Leonard Alexander 

A.B., Upsala College, 1915 
Gustavus Herbert Anderson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Paul Harold Andreen 

A.B., Augustana College, 1911 
Victor Emanuel Beck 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Carl August Bengtson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1915 
Adolf Theodor Bergquist 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Anton Emanuel Bomgren 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Carl Oscar Bostrom 

A.B., Upsala College, 1915 
Otto Henry Bostrom 

A.B., Augustana College, 1910 

Ph.D., Yale University, 1916 
Charles William Erickson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1913 
Frank Harry Hanson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Frank William Hanson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Eric Julius Heurlin 

A.B., Bethany College, 1904 
Arthur Oscar Hjelm 

A.B., Upsala College, 1916 
Ernest Hjalmar Jackson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1915 
Albert John Johnson 

Upsala College, 1915 
Magnus Arthur Johnson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Otto Philip Johnson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Lawrence Edwin Jones 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Julius Albin Larson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Johannes Emanuel Lindberg 

A.B., Lund University, Sweden, 1911 



Kenosha, Wis. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Rock Island 
St. James, Minn. 
Longmont, Colo. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Washington, Conn. 
Portland, Conn. 
Rock Island 

St. Hilaire, Minn. 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Malmo, Nebr. 
Orion 
Gary, Ind. 
Crooks, Minn. 
Warren, Pa. 
Canton 
Chicago 






ROLL OF STUDENTS 



147 



Albin Lindgren 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Herbert Sigfrid Magney 

A.B., University of Minnesota, 1915 
Carl David Waldemar Nelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Johan Fredrik Nelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Theodore Bengt Nordale 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Martin Oscar Olson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Halvar George Randolph 

A.B., Upsala College, 1913 
Ernst Julius Sakrison 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 



Lindstrom, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Marathon, Iowa 
Batavia 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chicago 

Springfield, Mass. 
St. Peter, Minn. 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Carl Gideon Harrison Ahnquist 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 
John Benson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 
Wilhelm Rudolph Bergh 

A.B., Upsala College, 1916 
Carl Oscar Carlson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Carl George Engdahl 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Ture Virgilius Anselm Ferm 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Carl Johan FranzSn 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Hugo Emanuel Gibson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Clarence Oscar Granlund 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Elmer Julius Holt 

A.B., Bethany College, 1916 
Carl Peter Constant Johnson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Ernest Arthur Larson 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
August Peterson Lawrence 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 



Tacoma, Wash. 
Hastings, Minn. 
Houtzdale, Pa. 
Aneby, Sweden 
Titusville, Pa. 
Chicago 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Lindsborg, Kans. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Ashtabula, Ohio 
Gowrie, Iowa 



148 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Carl Fredrik Mathias Lindberg 

A. B., Augustana College, 1914 
Alvin Daniel Mattson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Nils Ludvig Melander 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Gustav Edwin Nelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
George R. Olson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Ernest Arvid Palm 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Johan Pearson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Walter Fritiof Peterson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1916 
Theodore Luther Rydback 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
E«lwin Johnson Vikman 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 



HOSPITANTS 

SENIOR YEAR 



Emil Benzon 

Nils Anders Blomstrand 

Ragnar Per Emil Byrenius 

Olof Hans Miller 

Fred Gustav Olson 



Omaha, Nebr. 
Manson, Iowa 
Duluth, Minn. 
Eau Clairs, Wis. 
Hancock, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Lockport 
Bertrand, Nebr. 
Denver, Colo. 
Rockford 



Rock Island 
Aurora, Nebr. 
oland, Sweden 
Leonardville, Kans. 
Gladstone, Mich. 



Gustav Albert Bjork 



MIDDLE YEAR 



Rock Island 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Carl Pontus Petersson Rock Island 

Senior Class, Augustana College. 



NON-RESIDENT HOSPITANT STUDENT 



Samuel M. Hill 



Colton, Ore. 



THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 



POSTGRADUATES 
Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts 
Marion Albert Andreen Class of '13 Stillwater, 

major subject — Physics. 
minor subject — Chemistry. 



Okla. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



149 



Rev. John Alfred Benander 

major subject — English. 

minor subject — Swedish. 
Rev. Charles E. Bengtson 

MAJOR SUBJECT — Sociology. 

minor subject — Ancient History. 
Rev. Per Ernst Bergstrom 

major subject — German. 

minor subject 1 — Swedish. 
Rev. Carl Wm. Carlson, Bethany Coll. 

major subject — Psychology. 

minor subject — Ethics. 
John Wheaton Casto, Penn College, 

major subject — Roman Archeology. 

minor subject — Economics. 
Rev. Efraim Ceder Upsala College, Class of '10 

major subject — History of Swedish Literature. 

minor subject — History and Political Science. 
Rev. Edward Ekstrom Class of '10 

major subject 1 — Swedish Literature. 

minor subject — Swedish Language. 
Rev. George Pahlund Class of 

major subject — Ancient History. 

minor subject — History. 
Rev. Thure Abraham Holmer 

major subject — English. 

minor subject — History. 
Rev. Frans Erik Wilhelm Kastman 

major subject — Swedish. 

minor subject — English. 
Rev. Joseph Walton Kempe 

major subject — History. 

minor subject? — Political Science. 
Rev. Johan August Landin 

major subject 1 — Sociology. 

minor subject — History. 
Karl Gottfrid Larson 

major subject? — Physics. 

minor subject — Chemistry. 
Johannes Emanuel Lindberg 
Lunds privata elementariaroverk 

major subject — History of Philosophy. 

minor subject — Philosophy of Religion. 



Class of '00 Rockford 



Class of '00 Kansas City, Mo. 
Class of '03 Holmes C'y, Minn. 
Class of '10 Worcester, Mass. 
Class of '03 Rock Island 

Buenos Ayres, S.A. 

Moline 



04 De Kalb 



Class of '09 



Rajahmundry, 
India. 



Class of '07 Ironwood, Mich. 



Class of '14 Creston, Iowa 



Class of '08 Chicago 



Class of '15 Rock Island 



Class of '11 Rock Island 



150 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Class of '11 Chicago 



Gotthard Lindholm G. A. College, Class of '13 Litchfield, Minn. 

major subject — Physics. 

minor subject" — Geology. 
Anna Marie Lindquist 

major subject— Psychology. 

minor subject — History. 
Nelson Arthur Siegfrid Miller, U. of la. Class of '15 

major subject — English Literature. 

minor subject 1 — English Language. 
Carl Edward Nelson G. A. College, Class of '03 

major subjects — Swedish. 

minor subject — English, 
ftev. Lawrence Fred. Nordstrom, Upsala, Class of '12 

major subject — Sociology. 

minor subject 1 — Physiology. 
Rev. Sven Gustav Ohman, D. D. 

major subject — English. 

minor subject 1 — Swedish. 
Rev. Ernst Edwin Ryden 

major subject 1 — English. 

minor subject — History. 
Julius Adam Reinemund 

major subject — English Literature. 

minor subject — Philosophy. 
Oliver Leonard Troxel, Northw. College, Class of '14 

major subject — Philosophy of Education. 

minor subject — Mathematics. 



Warren, Minn. 



Rock Island 



Port Richmond, 
New York, N. Y. 



Class of '15 New Britain, Ct. 



Class of '10, Jamestown, N. Y. 



Class of '11 Muscatine, Iowa 



Litchfield, Minn. 



resident graduates 



Hildegard Maria Anderson 
Ado'f Martin Benson 
Ralph Daniel Hult 
Karl Gottfrid Larson 



Rock Island 
Voxtorp, Sweden 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Rock Island 



UNDERGRADUATES 

SENIOR CLASS 

Carl Arthur Anderson 
Rachel Anderson 
Arthur Garfield Benson 
Luther John Benson 
Abby Denman Blakemore 
Carl Leonard Carlson 
Ruth Amalia Carlson 
Anna Ingeborg Cesander 
Marie Theresa De Vere 



East Tawas, Mich. 
Galesburg 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Portville, N. Y. 
Moline 

Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Davenport, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



151 



Victor Alexander Elmblad 
Edmond Russell Fredrickson 
Hjalmar Edward Fryxell 
Gerda Marie Hiller 
Carl Titus Amadeus Holmen 
Arthur Theodore Johnson 
Emil Julius Johnson 
Lael Alberta Regina Johnson 
Lillian Henrietta Johnson 
Egner Johnny Larsen 
Esther Hildegard Larson 
Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 
Harold Raymor Lundgren 
John Anderson Martin 
Bessie Lavina Miller 
John Arthur Molander 
Julius Vincent Nordgren 
Petrus Herbert Nordlander 
Ruth Plorents Olson 
Nils Holger Pearson 
Elmer Theodore Peterson 
Carl Pontus Petersson 
Karl Peter Silberg 
John Nilson Steimer 
Arthur Valdemar Swedberg 



Skanee, Mich. 
Essex, Iowa 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Chesterton, Ind. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Red Wing, Minn. 
Gary, Ind. 
Mead, Nebr. 
Smethport, Pa. 
Chicago 
Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Turlock, Calif. 
Rock Island 
Marinette, Wis. 
Galva 

Rock Island 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Providence, R. I. 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Sjobo, Sweden 
Rhinelander, Wis. 



JUNIOB CLASS 

Harry Carl Anderson 
Laura Annette Anderson 
Esther Miriam Andreen 
Clarence Edward Blomberg 
Blanche Mildred Carpenter 
Arnold Ferdinand Cederburg 
Pearle Irene Crone 
Edna Eugenia Curry 
Harriet Calista Darling 
John David Ekstrom 
Vernon Alexis Ericson 
Adolf Emil Theodore Fant 
Inez Marguerite Gull 
Rudolph Gustaf Hanson 
Charles Winfield Holmgren 
Edgar Herman Johnson 
George Franklin Johnson 
John Emil Leonard Johnson 



Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Axtell, Nebr. 

Rutland 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Del Valle, Texas 

Wakefield, Nebr. 

Ophiem 

Goodhue, Minn. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Moline 

Wausa, Nebr. 

Moline 

Round Rock, Texas 



152 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



John Herman Johnson 
Carl Harry Kalquist 
Reuben Paul Kron 
Anna Myrtle Otelia Larson 
Joseph Emanuel Lind 
Helen Janet Miller 
Edmund David Nelson 
Harry Edgar Olson 
Mae Christina Olson 
Paul Victor Randolph 
Eva Velta Robb 
Clarence Oliver Samuelson 
Carl Axel Bernard Swanson 
Irvin Carl Swenson 
Glenn Alex Trevor 
Donald McLean Vance 



Rock Island 
Newport, R. I. 
Dayton, Iowa 
Fairfield, Iowa 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Somers, Wis. 
Moline 

Winfield, Iowa 
Reynolds 
Boone, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Mead, Nebr. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Dayton, Iowa 
Moline 
Rock Island 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Albin Arthur Adel Anderson 
David Edward Anderson 
Florence Mabel Anderson 
Gerald Joseph Clarence Anderson 
Margaret Catharine Anderson 
George Nathaniel Anselm 
Anders Emery Benander 
Hjalmar Henry Bergh 
Oscar Fredrick Bohman 
Hazel Anderson Brashear 
Noble Elmer Brewer 
James Donald Bruner 
Elizabeth Dietz Bryan 
Laurence Joel Eckstrom 
Allen Townsend Eddy 
Robert William Erickson 
Simon Emanuel Fagerstrom 
James Levi Fitzpatrick 
Louise Emelia Fivey 
Carl Joseph Forsberg 
Eben Verner Forsling 
Philip Shear! Franzen 
Paul Joel August Gustafson 
Fae Rebecca Hanna 
Gertrude Leona Jacobson 
August Julius Johnson 
Emil Johnson 



Wahoo, Nebr. 

Chicago 

Wakefield, Nebr. 

Boxholm, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Moscow, Idaho 

Boston, Mass. 

Marquette, Mich. 

Moline 

Moline 

Abilene, Kans. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Worcester, Mass. 

Milan 

W T inburne, Pa. 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Keokuk, Iowa' 

So. St. Paul, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Chicago 

Kila, Sweden 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



153 



Karl Edward Johnson 
Paul Oliver Johnson 
Albert Leonard Kendall 
Hugo Christian Larson 
Theodore Samuel Lenz 
Carl Nathaniel Lindahl 
George Albert Magnuson 
Marion Frances Maroney 
Earl Pehr Martinson 
Anders Wilhelm Nelson 
John Elmer Nelson 
Arthur Benjamin Nicholson 
Herbert Theodore Olander 
Carl Ewald Palmer 
Reuben Nathaniel Palmer 
Wilbur Nathaniel Palmquist 
Roy Victor Peel 
John Raoul Redstrom 
Franklin Bliss Rinck 
Elmer Emanuel Logan Swanson 
Ellen Richards Thompson 
Martin Ferdinand Trued 
Edna Erika Wilson 



Rock Island 
Springfield 
Ottumwa, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Hawkeye, Iowa 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Lancaster, Minn. 
Rock Island 
St. Charles 
Kearney, Nebr. 
Moline 

Chesterton, Ind. 
Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Chisago City, Minn. 
Lawton, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Ceresco, Nebr. 
Lake City, Minn. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

Alvin Aimer 

August Samuel Anderson 
Evelyn Alice Anderson 
Roy Andrew Anderson 
William Axel Anderson 
Clarence Harold Anderzon 
Aldo Ernest Aronson 
Forrest Clifford Baumbach 
Helmer Benson 
Florence Edna Bladel 
Edwin Matheus Blomquist 
Norma Camilla Brown 
Arthur Carl Brunell 
Edward Julius Carlson 
Gertrude Caroline Carlson 
Roger Martin Carlson 
Elsie Cornelia Collins 
Martin Emanuel Collins 
Howard Malcolm Cooper 
Martin Luther Cornell 



New London, Minn. 
Chicago 

Sioux City, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Marinette, Wis. 
Valparaiso, Nebr. 
Iron River, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Metropolitan, Mich. 
Davenport, Iowa. 
Chicago 

Swedesburg, Iowa 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Harcourt, Iowa 
Wakefield, Nebr. 
Essex, Iowa 
Moline 
Watertown, Minn. 



154 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Roena Festella Darling 
Albert Eliason 
John Alfred Bison 
Clarence Erwin Englund 
Frederick Clark Freytag 
Carl Axel Emanuel Gustafson 
Carl Edwin Johnson 
Eskil Cornelia Johnson 
Harold William Johnson 
Ida Albertina Johnson 
Oscar Martin Johnson 
Louise Beatrice Kinquist 
Luther Philip Kron 
Mabel Larson 
Amos Lundquist 
Marvin Harrison Lyon 
Charlotte Eugenia Murray 
Byron Nelson 
Maurice Leland Nordgren 
Elizabeth Olmsted 
Robert Ernst Olmsted 
Hannah Tillie Olson 
Paul Rufus Pearson 
Alfred Bernhard Peterson 
Arthur Herman Peterson 
Eva Dorothy Peterson 
Magnhild Sophia Peterson 
Roger Oliver Peterson 
Robert Fritjof Poison 
Esthena Johanna Randolph 
David Redfield 
Leon Edward Robinson 
Carl Milo Rylander 
Glenn Gilman Samuelson 
Enoch Natanael Sanden 
Elza Scharfenberg 
Vivian Schroder 
Blanche Lucy Searle 
Margaret Searle 
Joel Frederick Seedoff 
Carl Wendell Sodergren 
Rudolph Bernard Stone 
Richard Linne Swanson 
Rudolph Julius Swanson 



Rock Island 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Willmar, Minn. 
Reynolds 
Funk, Nebr. 
Ridgway, Pa. 
Ogden, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Ludington, Mich. 
Reed City, Mich. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Dayton, Iowa 
Washington, Iowa 
East Moline 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Chicago 
Galva 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Gladstone, Mich. 
Concord, Nebr. 
Ogden, Iowa 
Nore Lena, Sweden 
Moline 

Arlington, Iowa 
Moline 

Montello, Mass. 
Boone, Iowa 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Altona 
Osco 

Blidsberg, Sweden 
Mazeppa, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Geneseo 
Rock Island 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
McKeesport, Pa. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 



ROLL, OF STUDENTS 



155 



Edd William Swedberg 
David Edwards Thompson 
Eric Herbert Wahlstrom 
Ruth Davidson Weed 
Mabel Wilhelmina West 
Hazel Mae Westerlund 
Archie Lawrence Wilson 



Rhinelander, Wis. 
Roodhouse 
Toreboda, Sweden 
Rock Island 
Ft. Dodge, Iowa 
Orion 
Creston, Iowa 



SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED COLLEGE 



Carl Oscar Algot Anderson 

Martha Catherine Anderson 

Robert Charles Campbell 

Richard Whitney Carter 

Reeffe Charles Crakes 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Ruth Eliason 

Esther Mable Fant 

Marie Duncan Freytag 

Nina Marie Hedlund 

Edith Leonore Eileen Johnson 

Mamie Melinda Johnson 

Van Emanuel Johnson 

Wallace Nathaniel Johnson 

Blanche Chrystabel Lucas 

Veva Marley 

Aline Jane Martin 

Edward William Meek 

Leona Elva Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Ebba Laurentcia Olson 

Frank Peterson 

Winifred Virginia Reck 

Erwin Richard Sailer 

John Ephraim Seth 

Walter Carl Edward Spencer 

Goldie Weinrott 



Missoula, Mont. 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Kendall, Mich. 

Moline 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Ophiem 

Reynolds 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Cambridge 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Kensington, Kans. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Lynn Center 

Lake City, Minn. 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Gladstone, Mich. 

Sebring, Fla. 

Tripp, S. D. 

Moline 

Akron, Ohio 

Moline 



THE ACADEMY 



FOURTH CLASS 

Gustav Fredrik Andree St. Paul, Minn. 

Mildred Hildegard lone Blomgren Rock Island 

Carl Hjalmar Freeman Ottumwa, Iowa 

Arvid Johnson Rockford 



156 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Esther Concordia Johnson 
Victor Emanuel Johnson 
Frans Joseph Luther Johnsson 
Charles Henry Krone 
Peter Alfred Martinson 
Carl Gustaf Okerblom 
Otto Emanuel Olson 
Lester Samuelson 



Rock Island 
Montrose, S. D. 
Galesburg 
Moline 

Hvellinge, Sweden 
Lynn Center 
Lodgepole, Nebr. 
Orion 



THIBD CLASS 

Cuno Albion Anderholm 

Evelyn Margaret Anderson 

Ralph Gustave Bengston 

Carl Gustaf Carlson 

George Henry Chase 

Harold Hass 

Henning Leonard Hassel 

Clarence Carl Hermann 

Axel Gunnar Holmstrom 

Lester Richard Horst 

Bernhard Olof Johnson 

Arthur Gustav Larson 

Gustav Fredrick Luther Lindstrom 

Eugene Theodore Lothgren 

Anna Mauritzson 

Victor August Walter Mennicke 

Carl Levi Nelson 

Daisy Maria Simmon 

Emil Alfred Swanson 

George Wissing 

SECOND CLASS 

Carl Oscar Anderson 

Melvin Edward Fulton Anderson 

Alexander Bernstein 

Edwin Mirinus Enberg 

Margaret Louise Franing 

Elmer Friedlund 

Per Oscar Theodore Johnson 

Anna Barbara Kempe 

Hermine Martha Kiessig 

Juliet McElvain 

Arthur Stowell Musson 

Charles August Strandberg 

Blanche Elna Wangelin 



Gardner, Mass. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Hallefors, Sweden 

Moline 

Coal Valley 

Mayger, Ore. 

Moline 

Brainerd, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Burea, Sweden 

Rockford 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Milan 

Moline 

Sioux City, Iowa 



Galva 

Lynn Center 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Kingsburg, Calif. 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Potter, Nebr. 

Milan 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



157 



FIRST CLASS 

Anna Anderson 
Gustav Strand Andreen 
Frank Applegren 
Robert Collier 
John Elmer Dahlgren 
Esther Marie Erickson 
Thure Nathaniel Pagerstrom 
Arthur Edwin Haltmeyer 
Lillian Elvera Hayes 
Henry Gustaf Hedlund 
Florence Nellie Johnson 
Vendla Marie Johnson 
Clara Dorothea Lange 
Anna Kathryn Leaf 
John Fred Mangelsdorf 
Hazel Irene Misner 
Dorothy Nelson 
Esther Victoria Nelson 
Esther Louisa Nothstein 
Martin Nathaniel Peterson 
Birger Swenson 

SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED 

Bertha Ingeborg Ahlquist 

Alfred Leander Anderson 

Minnie Emelia Anderson 

Mabel Eleanor Arnell 

Etta Evans Barr 

Paul Arthur Benson 

Elsie Dorothy Bildahl 

Oscar Edwin Emanuel Blick 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Yngve Oscar Carlson 

Benny Theodore Erholm 

Helga Johanna Granere 

Teckla Marie Hanson 

Leona Haywood 

Thelma Helquist 

Edith Luella Hill 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Ethel Matilda Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Vincent Johnson 

Ebba Maria Leaf 



Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Galesburg 

Belvidere 

Gilbert, Mich. 

Lynn Center 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Moline 

Sherrard 

Detroit, Mich. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Rock Island 

Milan 

Cambridge 

Prophetstown 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Chicago 

ACADEMY 

Molltorp, Sweden 
Missoula, Mont. 
Orion 

Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
New Windsor 
Rockford 
New Windsor 
Moline 
Moline 

Anacortes, Wash. 
Rock Island 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Rock Island 
So. Bend, Ind. 
Delmar, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Newport, R. I. 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 



158 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Edward William Mangelsdorf 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Evelyn Mills 

Maria Sculdfried Pearson 

Anna Florentine Peterson 

Elvira Elizabeth Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Ruby Mathilda Peterson 

Esther Mathilda Petterson 

Edward John Stark 

Esther Laurinda Victoria Stenborg 

Lydia Elvira Marie Stenborg 

Clifford Stone 

Helen Storbeck 

Edith Christina Swanson 

Reuben Arthur Swanson 

Perry Taber 

Florence Anna Geneva Thoren 

Clarence Samuel Trued 

Loni Lina Vullgraf 

Laura Woodburn 



Rock Island 
Osceola, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
West Brook, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Galesburg 
Elk Point, S. D. 
Newberry, Mich. 
Center City, Minn. 
Center City, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Loveland, Colo. 
East Moline 
Prophetstown 
Denver, Colo. 
Ceresco, Nebr. 
Farmersburg, Iowa 
Hillsdale 



PREPARATORY 

Marie Anderson 

Ruth Alfrida Olivia Anderson 

Constance Hildegard Olivia Benna 

Soren Peter Christensen 

Aaron Christopher Hermanson 

Frank Oscar Johnson 

Esther Maria Pihlstrom 

Esther Quist 

Granville Hudson Sherwood 

Leonard Westberg 



Rock Island 
Albert City, Iowa 
Albert City, Iowa 
Denmark 

Rimforsa, Sweden 
Eau Claire, Wis. 
Nyskoga, Sweden 
Albert City, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Eau Claire, Wis. 



THE SUMMER 
Martha Ackerlind 
Hildegard Maria Anderson 
Judith Anderson 
Clara Priscilla Blakemore 
Kathryn Brabander 
Mildred Chapman 
Nettie Dodge 
Helen Dodson 
Irene Florence Dodson 
Margaret Ferry 



SCHOOL 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



159 



Karl Victor Froude 

Clara Grandin 

Dora Hartz 

Winifred Huntoon 

Fannie Inglis 

Mrs. Louise Koch 

Mary Lannen 

Karl Gottfrid Larson 

Signe Alfrida Larson 

Victor August Walter Mennicke 

June Nelson 

Oliver Leonard Olson 

Emma Seefeldt 

Edith Stanley 

Mabel Sundehn 

Minnie Vogel 

Grace Weatherhead 

Mrs. Ida Weed 

Mrs. Dacie Williams 

Leonora Witherspoon 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Geneseo 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Milan 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



PIANO 

Bertha Ingeborg Ahlquist 

Mary Louise Ainsworth 

Bernard Anderson 

Evelyn Alice Anderson 

Geneva Fredricka Anderson 

Harold Anderson 

Helen Anderson 

Herbert Anderson 

Ingegerd Maria Anderson 

Lillian Hildegard Anderson 

Lucille Anderson 

Ruth Alfrida Olivia Anderson 

Gustav Strand Andreen 

Ila Leone Anthony 

Mabel Arnell 

Lola Mae Barker 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Etta Evans Barr 

Adeline Beaver 

Victor Emanuel Beck 



Molltorp, Sweden 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Albert City, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

St. James, Minn. 



160 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Helen Becker 

Constance Hildegard Olivia Benna 

Mildred Dorothea Benzon 

Laverne Bergendahl 

Carl Bergstrom 

Elaine Bergstrom 

Wilfrid Carl Bersell 

Carl Oscar Bostrom 

Barney Brotman 

Arthur Cameron 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Buel Gabriella Carlson 

Ebba Carlson 

LeRoy Carlson 

Victor Carlson 

Anna Ingeborg Cesander 

Audrey May Cropper 

Wilma Curtis 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Wilford John Eiteman 

Ruth Eliason 

Edwin Mirinus Enberg 

Dorothy Falk 

Pearl Falk 

Anna Faust 

Nellie Myrtle Faust 

Nellie Florin 

Marie Duncan Freytag 

Vera Gustafson 

Linna Cathers Hall 

Teckla Marie Hanson 

Adeline Hawkinson 

Nina Marie Hedlund 

Thelma Pauline Helquist 

Aaron Hermanson 

Edith Luella Hill 

Judith Pauline Huline 

Mildred Anna Ingraham 

Gertrude Jacobson 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Ethel Matilda Johnson 

Frances Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Oscar Martin Johnson 



Moline 

Marathon, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Portland, Conn. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Geneva 

Moline 

Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Swift Current, Canada 

Rock Island 

Daggett, Mich. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Carbon Cliff 

Reynolds 

Moline 

Moline 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Moline 

Osceola, Nebr. 

So. Bend, Ind. 

Rimforsa, Sweden 

Delmar, Iowa 

Cambridge 

Davenport, Iowa 

Geneseo 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Newport, R. I. 

Reed City, Mich. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



161 



Otto Philip Johnson 

Esther Vivian Johnston 

Carl Elwood Holcomb Kraft 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Frieda Marie Lindblom 

Olive Lindblom 

Wava Catholine Lindstrom 

Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 

Marvin Charles McNeill 

Herbert Sigfrid Magney 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Elsa Mauritzson 

May Nelson 

Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Signe Linnea Nelson 

Violet Nelson 

Viva Ninemires 

Mildred Odean 

Elizabeth Olmsted 

Rolf August Olson 

Adele Eugenia Olson 

Earle Ferdinand Olson 

Ebba Laurentcia Olson 

Harry Edgar Olson 

Ernest Arvid Palm 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Anna Florentine Peterson 

Beulah Peterson 

Elvira Elizabeth Peterson 

Esther Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Mable Peterson 

Viola Peterson 

Esther Mathilda Petterson 

Esther Quist 

Ellen Rosene 

Dorothy Elizabeth Scherrer 

Margaret Searle 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 

Marion Sohner 

Hazel Spaulding 

Mabel Ruby Steinman 

Esther Laurinda Victoria Stenborg 

Lydia Elvira Marie Stenborg 



Crooks, S. D. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenr 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Sherrard 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Duluth, Minn. 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Manistique, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Galesburg 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Winfield, Iowa 

Ludington, Mich. 

Rock Island 

West Brook, Minn. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Orion 

Rock Island 

Oakland, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Albert City, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Milan 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

Center City, Minn. 

Center City, Minn. 



College Catalog 11 



162 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Ardes Stock 

Irene Amy Streed 

Ida Sturm 

Edith Christine Swanson 

Perry Taber 

Mina Tanner 

Florence Anna Geneva Thoren 

Florence Annalene Vanatta 

Edna Voss 

Edna Erika Wilson 

Mrs. Minerva French Warner 

Laura Frances Woodburn 



Moline 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Loveland, Colo. 
Prophetstown 
Milan 

Denver, Colo. 
Taylor Ridge 
Rock Island 
Lake City, Minn. 
Bluffton, Ind. 
Hillsdale 



ORGAN 

Bertha Ingeborg Ahlquist 

Martha Catherine Anderson 

Etta Bailey 

LeRoy Carlson 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Blanche Ehler 

Ruth Eliason 

Aaron Hermanson 

Judith Pauline Huline 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Lydia Wiihelmina Johnson 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Murrel Lindorff 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 

Vincent Nordgren 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Hanna Elizabeth Peterson 

Esther Mathilda I etterson 

Esther Quist 

Mrs. E. M. Reading 

Hazel Spaulding 

Mabel Ruby Steiuman 

Samuel Clarence Trued 

Grace Ullemeyer 



VIOLIN 



Frances Anderson 
Gustav Strand Andreen 
Alexander Bernstein 
Loise Katherine Boline 



Molltorp, Sweden 

Des Moines, Iowa 

Orion 

Geneva 

Daggett, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Rimforsa, Sweden 

Cambridge 

Newport, R. I. 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Rock Island 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Chicago 

Galva 

Rock Island 

Little Falls, Minn. 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Albert City, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

Ceresco, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rock Island 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



163 



Allden Eugene Burton 

Blanche Ehler 

Elizabeth Gaylord 

Helga Granere 

Leona Hamer Haywood 

Carl Holmen 

Genevieve Hunt 

Ernest Hjalmar Jackson 

Kenneth Stempel Kempe 

Karl Kirkman 

Andorra Larson 

Philip Licata 

Wava Catholine Lindstrom 

Veva Marley 

Culver Wilson Masters 

David Richard Maxwell 

Joseph Moore 

Arthur Stowell Musson 

Carl Arthur Nelson 

Mary Catherine Paul 

Esther Alice Peterson 

Hulda Eunice Peterson 

Esther Maria Pihlstrom 

Harold Romme 

Sam Ruben 

Grace Saville 

John Henry Ernest Stapp 

Ludvig Andrew Stapp 

Jenny Emelia Swanquist 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Essex, Iowa 
Moline 

Malmo, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Sherrard 

Kensington, Kans. 
Rock Island 
Hampton 
Moline 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Orion 

Rock Island 
Nyskoga, Sweden 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Walcott, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 



Howard Elmer Johnson 
Perry Taber 



CORNET 



Moline 
Prophetstown 



VOICE 

Martha Catherine Anderson 

Ruth Alfrida Olivia Anderson 

Zana Anderson 

Ethel Julia Barr 

Carl August Bengtson 

Constance Hildegard Olivia Benna 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Laura Christine Carlson 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Ruth Eliason 



Des Moines, Iowa 
Albert City, Iowa 
Republic, Mo. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Longmont, Colo. 
Marathon, Iowa 
Moline 
Erie, Pa. 
Moline 
Swedeburg, Nebr. 



164 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Carl Hjalmar Freeman 
Teckla Marie Hanson 
Nina Marie Hedlund 
Thelma Pauline Helquist 
Edith Luella Hill 
Elmer Julius Holt 
Judith Pauline Huline 
Emil Julius Johnson 
Ethel Mathilda Johnson 
Mildred Lillian Johnson 
Mrs. John Martin 
Ithiel George Morgan 
Dorothy Marie Nelson 
Ruth Eleanor Nelson 
Ruth Florents Olson 
Victor Rosenius Pearson 
Hannah Elizabeth Peterson 
Mable Peterson 
Roger Oliver Peterson 
Walter Pritiof Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Esther Quist 
Paul Victor Randolph 
Emma Rohr 

Glenn Gilman Samuelson 
Marjorie Haas Samuelson 
Lawrence Joseph Sodergren 
Irene Amy Streed 
Jessie Myrtle Strombeck 
Rudolph Julius Swanson 
Edna Voss 

Hazel Mae Westerlund 
Edna Erika Wilson 



Ottumwa, Iowa 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Osceola, Nebr. 
So. Bend, Ind. 
Delmar, Iowa 
Bridgeport, Kans. 
Cambridge 
Ludington, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Silvis 
Cambridge 
Lake City, Minn. 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Little Falls, Minn. 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Moline 

Bertrand, Nebr. 
Elk Point, S. D. 
Albert City, Iowa 
Boone, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Osco 
Moline 

Holdrege, Nebr. 
Moline 
Moline 

Wahoo, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Orion 
Lake City, Minn. 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen Moline 

Ruth Eliason Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson Lake City, Minn. 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw Milan 



THEORY 

Evelyn Alice Anderson 
Martha Catherine Anderson 
Mabel Arnell 
Lola Mae Barker 



Sioux City, Iowa 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Maquoketa, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



165 



Le Roy Carlson 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Ruth Eliason 

Marie Duncan Freytag 

Helga Granere 

Leona Hamer Haywood 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Ethel Matilda Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Lydia Wilhelmina Johnson 

Oscar Martin Johnson 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Elizabeth Olmsted 

Earl Ferdinand Olson 

Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Helen Isabel Parker 

Anna Florentine Peterson 

Hannah Elizabeth Peterson 

Esther Mathilda Petterson 

Esther Quist 

Winifred Virginia Reck 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 

Mabel Ruby Steinman 

Edith Christine Swanson 

Samuel Clarence Trued 

CLASSES IN HISTORY OF MUSIC, ANALYSIS. 

AND SIGHT PLAY 

Martha Catherine Anderson 

Mabel Arnell 

Ruth Adelia Carlmark 

Le Roy Carlson 

Martin Conrad Dahlberg 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Ruth Eliason 

Marie Duncan Freytag 

Helga Granere 

Leona Hamer Haywood 

Ethel Matilda Johnson 

John Edward Francis Johnson 

Oscar Martin Johnson 



Geneva 

Daggett, Mich. 

Moline 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Reynolds 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Newport, R. I. 

Reed City, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Chicago 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Galesburg 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Rock Island 

West Brook, Minn. 

Little Falls, Minn. 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Albert City, Iowa 

Sebring, Fla. 

Milan 

Rock Island 

Loveland, Colo. 

Ceresco, Nebr. 

SIGHT SINGING, EAR TRAINING, 
ING 

Des Moines, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Geneva 

Daggett, Mich. 
Moline 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 
Reynolds 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Newport, R. I. 
Reed City, Mich. 



166 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Ebba Maria Leaf 
Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 
Veva Marley 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 
Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 
Ruth Eleanor Nelson 
Harry Edgar Olson 
Earl Ferdinand Olson 
Helen Isabel Parker 
Anna Florentine Peterson 
Hannah Elizabeth Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Eleanor Valencourt Shaw 
Mabel Ruby Steinman 
Edith Christine Swanson 
Laura Frances Woodburn 



August Samuel Anderson 

Minnie Emelia Anderson 

William Axel Anderson 

John William Berglund 

Abby Blakemore 

Mildred Blomgren 

Ruth Carlson 

Audrey May Cropper 

Victor Alexander Elmblad 

Effie Farrell 

Nina Marie Hedlund 

Gerda Hiller 

Emil Julius Johnson 

Eskil Cornelia Johnson 

Esther Johnson 

Lillian Johnson 

Louise Beatrice Kinquist 

Luther Philip Kron 

Mabel Larson 

Theodor Samuel Lenz 

Louella Fanny Long 

Earl Pehr Martinson 

Peter Alfred Martinson 

Byron Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Otto Emanuel Olson 



Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Chicago 

Kensington, Kans. 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Winfield, Iowa 

Galesburg 

Rock Island 

West Brook, Minn. 

Little Falls, Minn. 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Milan 

Rockford 

Loveland, Colo. 

Hillsdale 



SCHOOL OF ART 



Chicago 

Rock Island 

Marinette, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Swift Current, Sask., Can. 

Skanee, Mich. 

Moline 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Ludington, Mich. 

Ogden, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Gary, Ind. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Dayton, Iowa 

Washington, Iowa 

Hawkeye, Iowa 

Rock Island 

St. Charles 

Gowrie, Iowa 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Lodgepole, Nebr. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



167 



Ruth Plorents Olson 
Magnhild Peterson 
Roger Oliver Peterson 
Enoch Natanael Sanden 
Elza Scharfenberg 
Mrs. Emil Schroder 
Karl Peter Silberg 
Eunice Alice Squire 
Florence Olivia Swanson 
Hazel Mae Westerlund 
Archie Lawrence Wilson 



Sioux City, Iowa 

Arlington, Iowa 

Moline 

Blidsberg, Sweden 

Mazeppa, Minn. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Altona 

Orion 

Creston, Iowa 



SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION 



PRIVATE PUPILS 

Hildegard Maria Anderson 

Mabel Arnell 

Etta Evans Barr 

John Luther Benson 

Ragnar Per Emil Byrenius 

Marhea Camblin 

Victoria Carlson 

Anna Ingeborg Cesander 

Ella Goldman 

Mrs. Pay Gregg 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Eskil Cornelia Johnson 

John Herman Johnson 

Louise Beatrice Kinquist 

Anna Myrtle Larson 

Veva Marley 

Ebba Lurentcia Olson 

Mae Christina Olson 

Esthena Johanna Randolph 

Winifred Virginia Reck 

John Ephraim Seth 

Esther Laurinda Victoria Stenborg 

Lydia Elvira Marie Stenborg 

Florence Olivia Swanson 

Goldie Bertha Weinrott 



Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

61and, Sweden 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Sioux Falls, S. D. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ogden, Iowa 

Chicago 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Moline 

Kensington, Kans. 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 

Reynolds 

Boone, Iowa 

Sebring, Fla. 

Moline 

Center City, Minn. 

Center City, Minn. 

Altona 

Moline 



168 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 

COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



MASTER OF ACCOUNTS 

Alf Leander Anderson 
Carl Anderson 
Ralph Bengston 
Oscar Edwin Blick 
Earl Fredrick Brodd 
Paul Emil Carius 
George Carlson 
Carl Freeman 
Julius Verne Jacobson 
John Lueschen 
Edward William Meek 
Eric Paul Torsten Olsson 
Walter Carl Edward Spencer 
Loni Lina Vullgraf 
Charles LeRoy Wagner 
George Wissing 

GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT 

Albert August Anderson 

Albert Leonard Anderson 

Alf Leander Anderson 

Carl Anderson 

Evelyn Anderson 

Melvin Edward Fulton Anderson 

Sigrid Marie Anderson 

Raymond Oliver Asplund 

Paul Arthur Benson 

Ralph Bengston 

Euphemia Billburg 

Paul Raymond Bjorling 

Angela Beatrice Bourgaise 

James Everett Bowes 

Earl Fredrick Brodd 

Paul Emil Carius 

Carl Martin Carlson 

George Carlson 

Herbert George Carlson 

Yngve Carlson 

Leonard Claasen 

Howard Malcolm Cooper 

John Elmer Dahlgren 

Leland Fredrick Dempsey 



COURSE 

Missoula, Mont. 
Missoula, Mont. 
Rock Island 
New Windsor 
Cambridge 
Moline 
Wataga 

Ottumwa, Iowa 
Geneseo 

Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Courtland ,Kans. 
Akron, Ohio 
Farmersburg, Iowa 
Moline 
Sioux City, Iowa 

COURSE 

Kenora, Ontario, Canada 

Orion 

Missoula, Mont. 

Missoula, Mont. 

Rock Island 

Lynn Center 

Prophetstown 

Orion 

New Windsor 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Altona 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Cambridge 

Moline 

Woodhull 

Wataga 

Harcourt, Iowa 

Moline 

Dayton, Iowa 

Moline 

Gilbert, Mich. 

Rock Island 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



169 



Esther Mabel Fant 

Eben Forsling 

Carl Freeman 

Blanche Catherine Glockhoff 

Florence Marie Goemble 

Edwin Gustafson 

Harold Hass 

Thelma Helquist 

Lester Horst 

Julius Verne Jacobson 

Alice Evelyn Johnson 

Clifford Johnson 

Edith Leonore Eillen Johnson 

Mauritz Harry Johnson 

Oscar Frank Johnson 

Verner Johnson 

Vincent Johnson 

Walter Ranold Johnson 

Gertrude Kerr 

Constantine Knanishu 

Johan Hagbert Kronberg 

Arthur Gottfried Larson 

Hazel Marie Laughead 

Mary Louisa Lentz 

John Lueschen 

Joel Ferdinand Lundquist 

Juliet McElvain 

Edward William Mangelsdorf 

John Fred Mangelsdorf 

Edward William Meek 

William Fay Moffett 

Albert Mueller 

Arthur Stowell Musson 

Carl Leonard Nelson 

Fred John Nelson 

Elmer Hedin Nicholson 

Eric Paul Torsten Olsson 

Ruby Mathilda Peterson 

Lester Samuelson 

Vernon Raymond Samuelson 

Jonas Olger Strand 

Oliver Emil Strandberg 

Arthur Swanson 

Florence Olivia Swanson 

Reuben Arthur Swanson 



Ophiem 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Orion 

Coal Valley 

So. Bend, Ind. 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Moline 

Chariton, Iowa 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Sycamore 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

Ludington, Mich. 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Ogden, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Dayton, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Alexis 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rockford 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Reynolds 

Taylor Ridge 

Moline 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Courtland, Kans. 

Galesburg 

Orion 

Orion 

Dayton, Iowa 

Onida 

Moline 

Altona 

East Moline 



170 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Lucille Swift 

Albert Taber 

Charles LeRoy Wagner 

Edward Anthony Wayne 

Leonard Westberg 

George Wissing 

STENOGRAPHIC 

Sigrid Marie Anderson 
Ila Leone Anthony 
Bessie Baker 
Warren Bengston 
Elsie Dorothy Bildahl 
Oscar Edwin Blick 
Angela Beatrice Bourgaise 
Paul Emil Carius 
Laura Christine Carlson 
Yngve Carlson 
Myrtle May Cheney 
Raymond Tegner Colson 
Audrey May Cropper 
Grace Veronia Duffy 
Esther Mabel Fant 
Blanche Catherine Glockhoff 
Florence Marie Goemble 
Marjorie Graham 
Grace Helen Griswold 
Edwin Gustafson 
Hildur Herrstrum 
Alice Evelyn Johnson 
Edith Lenore Eillen Johnson 
Vincent Johnson 
Gertrude Kerr 
Gertrude Lewis 
Blanche Christabel Lucas 
Elliott Monett Lundberg 
Joel Ferdinand Lundquist 
Helen Adams McKahin 
Edward William Mangelsdorf 
Rose Mansfield 
Aline Jane Martin 
Edward William Meek 
William Fay Moffett 
Carl Leonard Nelson 
Leone Elva Nelson 
Elmer Hedin Nicholson 



Camden, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Reynolds 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

Sioux City, Iowa 

COURSE 

Prophetstown 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

New Windsor 

Davenport, Iowa 

Moline 

Erie, Pa. 

Moline 

Milan 

Moline 

Swift Current, Sask, Can. 

Rock Island 

Ophiem 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Orion 

Moline 

Moline 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Rockford 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Reynolds 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Lynn Center 

Rhinelander, Wis. 






ROLL OF STUDENTS 



171 



Rolf August Olsen 

Eric Paul Torsten Olsson 

Bertha Pedersen 

Mable Peterson 

Ruby Matilda Peterson 

Roger Peterson 

Elsie Elizabeth Russ 

Dorothy Elizabeth Scherrer 

Hazel Spaulding 

Mildred Alfreda Spencer 

Walter Carl Edward Spencer 

Helen Matilda Storbeck 

Arthur Swanson 

Florence Olivia Swanson 

Lucille Swift 

Albert Taber 

Florence Anna Geneva Thoren 

Mary Lee Thompson 

Charles LeRoy Wagner 

Edward Anthony Wayne 

Fred Ralph Wessman 



Manistique, Mich. 

Courtland, Kans. 

Rock Island 

Oakland, Nebr. 

Galesburg 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Akron, Ohio 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Altona 

Camden, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Denver, Colo. 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Reynolds 

Red Oak, Iowa 



172 SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT 



SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT 



1916—1917 
Theological Seminary: 

MALE FEMALE TOTAL 

Postgraduates 24 

Undergraduates 69 

Special Hospitants 8 

101 
Collegiate Department: 

Postgraduates 23 1 24 

Resident Graduates 3 1 4 

Seniors 23 11 34 

Juniors 23 11 34 

Sophomores 40 10 50 

Freshmen 48 23 71 

Special and Unclassified 11 16 27 

171 73 244 

Academic Department: 

Fourth Class 10 2 12 

Third Class 17 3 20 

Second Class 8 5 13 

First Class 10 11 21 

Special and Unclassified 13 29 42 

58 50 108 

Preparatory Department 5 5 10 

Summer School 4 26 30 

Conservatory of Music 56 131 187 

School of Art 15 22 37 

School of Elocution 4 21 25 

Commercial Department 66 43 109 

Net Total* 406 264 670 



*After deducting for those counted more than once. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 173 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



During the months of July and August, 1916, a Summer school for 
teachers was conducted at Augustana College. The results, in respect 
to attendance, quality of work done, and practical benefit, were so grati- 
fying that it was decided to make this a permanent feature of the 
Institution. Accordingly announcement is hereby made that during 
the Summer of 1917 courses in English Literature, Psychology, Prin- 
ciples of teaching and History of Education are offered to afford the 
teachers and those preparing to teach in our public schools an oppor- 
tunity to improve their equipment for their professional work. These 
courses will be of strictly College grade and will be given in double 
periods of an hour and a half each for six weeks, five days each week, 
so that the work done will be equivalent to that of twelve weeks with 
forty-five minute periods. By this arrangement, which has proved 
entirely satisfactory in the past and is practised at the State Normal 
schools, students will be able to earn three full semester hours in each 
of the subjects named. The credits earned in this way are recognized 
by the local school authorities and also by the State Examining Board 
at Springfield; they will count not only for State Certificate but also 
for graduation at this and other Colleges. 

Additional courses, of Academy or high school grade, will be offered 
in English Grammar, U. S. History, Civics, Arithmetic, and Algebra 
for the benefit of those who may wish to review or make up in these 
branches preparatory to examination for second grade certificate or 
for entrance to College, provided a sufficient number enroll to justify 
the giving of such courses. 

The term will begin Monday, June 25th, and will end Friday, Aug. 3rd. 

RATES OF TUITION 

For College grade work $12.00 

For Academy grade work 10.00 

For further particulars address the President, Gustav Andreen, Rock 
Island, 111. 



174 



INDEX 



Academic Department, 12, 16, 20. 

Adelphic Society, 118. 

Admission, College and Academy, 

General Requirements, 16. 

On Certificate, 18. 

Into the Seminary, 54. 
Advanced Credits, 18. 
Aid Fund, 129. 
Alumni Association, 128. 
Appointments, Committe on, 9. 
Archives, 115. 
Art School, 91. 
Athletic Association, 122. 
Athletics, 119. 
Augustana Prohib. League, 120. 

Band, 123. 
Bible Society, 122. 
Biological Laboratory, 114. 
Board of Control: 

Of Athletics, 9. 

Of Forensics, 9, 120. 

Of Public Meetings, 9. 
Board of Directors, 4. 
Board and Room, 108. 
Bookkeeping, 97. 
Buildings, 131. 

Calendars: 

Academy, College and Semi- 
nary, 3. 

Commercial Department, 3. 

Conservatory, 69. 
Charter, 133. 
Christianity, 18. 
Clef Club, 126. 

Collegiate Department, 12, 14 ff. 
Collegiate Faculty, 14, 15. 
Commercial Department: 

Faculty, 95. 

General Statement, 95. 
Committees, Standing, 9, 10. 
Concordia Society, 119. 
Conservatory of Music, 12, 69 ff. 
Courses of Instruction: 

Preparatory, Academy, College, 
25. 

Theological Seminary, 56 ff. 

Conservatory, 78. 

Commercial Department, 96 ff. 



Courses of Study: 

Preparatory and Academic, 20 ff. 

College, 22 ff. 

Normal, 50, 51. 

Seminary, 55 ff. 

Postgraduate, in College, 52. 

Postgraduate, in Seminary, 62. 

Conservatory, 73 ff. 

Commercial Department, 96 ff. 

School of Art, 91. 

Elocution, 13. 

Select, 18. 
Credits, Advanced, 18. 
Curator of Archives, 9, 115. 

Debating Clubs, 120. 

Debating League, 121. 

Degrees, Diplomas, and Graduates 

for 1916, 139 ff. 
Denkmann Memorial Library, 110 

ff., 132. 
Departments and Courses: 

Preparatory, 12, 20. 

Academic, 12, 20 ff. 

Collegiate, 12, 21 ff. 

Normal, 12, 50. 

Theological, 12, 54 ff. 

Conservatory, 12, 69 ff. 

Commercial, 13, 95. 

Art, 12, 91. 

Elocution, 13, 93. 
Diplomas, 50, 52, 67, 72, 106. 

Elective Units, 16, 17. 
Elocution, 93. 

Endowment Fund Society, 127. 
Enrolment, Regulations, 18. 
Enrolment, Summary, 172. 
Ethnographical Collection, 115. 
Executive Committee of Board, 4. 
Examinations in Music, 87. 
Expenses : 

Board and Room, 108. 

Fees, 108, 109. 

Tuition. See Sub Tuition. 

Faculties: 

General, 5 — 8. 
Collegiate, 14, 15. 
Seminary, 54. 






INDEX 



175 



Conservatory, 69. 
Commercial, 95. 
Foreign Mission Society, 118. 

General Information, 107, (Cons.) 

87. 
Graduation, 21, 50, 56, 73, 104. 
Graduation, 21, 50. 
Groups of Studies, 21—25. 
Gymnastics, General, 121. 

Handel Oratorio Society, 124. 
Historical Collections, 115 ff. 
Historical Sketch, 135. 

Iduna Society, 120. 
Information, General, 107. 

Laboratories, 114, 115. 

Ladies' Hall, 109. 

Ligrary and Reading Room, 110 ff. 

Location and Buildings, 131. 

Luther Bible Society, 122. 

Lyceum, 119. 

Matriculation in the Seminary, 54. 

Matron, 10. 

Mission Society, 118. 

Museum, 114. 

Musical Organizations, 124 ff. 

Normal Department, 50. 

Observer, Augustana, 117. 

Officers of the Board, 4. 

Officers and Standing Committees, 

9, 10. 
Olov Rudbeck, 120. 
Oratorio Society, 124. 
Orchestra, 123. 
Organ, Course in, 80. 
Oriole Ladies' Chorus, 127. 

Penmanship, 100. 

Phonography, Insert facing p. 102 

Phrenokosmian Society, 118. 

Physical Culture, 121. 

Physics and Chemistry, Labora- 
tory, 115. 

Piano, Course in, 78. 

Postgraduate Courses: 
College, 52. 
Seminary, 62 ff. 

Preparatory Department, 20. 



Principal of Ladies' Hall, 10. 
Prohibition League, 122. 
Reading Room, 110. 
Registrar, 10. 
Roll of Students, 144. 
Rules and Regulations: 

Academy and College, 53. 

Seminary, 67. 

Conservatory, 87. 

Scholarships, 129 ff. 
School of Art, 12, 91. 
Secretary: 

General Faculty, 9. 

College Faculty, 9. 

Theological Faculty, 9. 

Conservatory Faculty, 9. 

Commercial Faculty, 9. 
Select Courses, 18. 
Seminary, 54 ff. 

Seminary Dormitory Fund, 131. 
Shorthand, Insert facing p. 102. 
Societies: 

Adeplhic, 118. 

Augustana For. Mission, 118. 

Augustana Endow. Fund, 127. 

Concordia, 119. 

Debating Societies, 120. 

Iduna, 120. 

Olov Rudbeck, 120. 

Phrenokosmian, 118. 

Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 
119. 

Tegner-Forbundet, 119. 
Stenography, Insert facing p. 102. 
Students' Aid Fund, 129. 
Students' Union, 117. 
Studies, Groups of, 21—25. 
Summary of Enrolment, 172. 
Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 119. 
Swedish Language, 19, 47. 

Teacher's Certificate Course, 50. 
Tegner-Forbundet, 119. 
Theological Seminary, 54 ff. 
Theory, Course in, 84. 
Tuition: 

Academy, College, and Normal, 
108. 

Conservatory, 88 ff. 

School of Art, 92. 

Elocution, 94. 

Commercial Department, 105. 
Typewriting, Insert facing p. 102. 



176 INDEX 

Units for Admission, 16, 17. Wennerberg Chorus, 126. 

Worship, Public, 107. 
Voice, Study of, 80. 
Violin, Course in, 83. Year, Division of, 107. 



F} 



LA^ 



AUGUSTANA BULLETIN 

Issued Quarterly by Augustana College and Theological Seminary, Rock Island, 111. 
SERIES XIII MARCH 3J, J9J8 No, \ 



CATALOG 



OF 



Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



1917-1918 

FIFTY-EIGHTH YEAR 



Entered April 18, 1905, at Rock Island, Illinois, as second class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



. 



. 




TO STUDENTS 

who now serve our Government in the Army or Navy! 

Greeting! 

You have shown your love of Country and devotion to 
her just cause by going forth, almost 2 00 strong, from the 
halls of Alma Mater. She rejoices in the splendid reports, 
which have come concerning- you from the camps. She ex- 
pects still greater things of you in service and in sacrifice, 
that victory may come to us in this titanic struggle for the 
welfare of humanity. She hopes some day to bid you welcome 
home again, and in all your experiences she invokes upon you 
God's blessing! 



A Service Flag, with the appropriate number of stars, was dedicated 
in the College Chapel on January 29, 1918. The names of all Augustana 
students now following the colors are given at the end of this catalog. 



CATALOG 



OF 



Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 



1917-1918 

Fifhj-eigktli Year 




ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

AUGUSTANA BOOK CONCERN, PRINTERS AND BINDERS 
1918 



JANUARY 



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School Calendar 



1918 
FALL TERM 

Registration and Examinations for} A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 
Admission and Promotion (September 2 and 3. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 4. 

Recitations in College, Academy, Con-"| 

servatory, and Commercial Depart- j.9 : 20 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 4. 

ment begin | 

(Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 24 
Matriculation for the Seminary ) a nd 25 

Opening Services in the Seminary 7:30 P. M., Wednesday, Sept. 25. 

Reformation Day Thursday, October 31. 

(Thursday and Friday, Nov. 28 
Thanksgiving Recess ) and 29 

Term ends .6 P. M., Thursday, Dec. 19. 

1919 
SPRING TERM 

Recitations in the Conservatory begin 8 A. M., Monday, Jan. 6. 
Registration and Examinations for} 9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion f Jan. 6 and 7. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 8. 

Recitations in College, Academy, and) 

Commercial Department begin. . . .| 9:2 ° A " M - Wednesda y- Jan - 8 ' 

Lectures in the Seminary begin 9:20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 15. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary begins 5 P. M., Wednesday, April 9. 
Easter Recess in the College, Acade-"| 

my, and Commercial Department INoon, Thursday, April 17. 

begins J 

Easter Recess ends 8 A. M., Tuesday, April 22. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary ends 8 A. M., Wednesday, April 23. 

Founders' Day Sunday, April 27. 

Recitations and Lectures cease 6 P. M., Friday, May 23. 

Commencement Exercises May 23 — 27. 

FALL TERM 1919 

Registration Sept. 1 and 2. 

Recitations begin Sept. 3. 

Seminary opens Sept. 24. 



AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Board of Directors 



MEMBERS 
Rev. LAWRENCE ALBERT JOHNSTON, D. D., R. N. 0., President of 
Synod, ex officio member. 
Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph. D., R. N. 0., K. V. 0., President 

of the Institution, ex officio member. 

TIME EXPIRES 

Rev. A. THEODORE EKBLAD, A. M., Superior, Wis 1918 

Rev. JOHN EKHOLM, Ph. D., Swedesburg, Iowa 1918 

Mr. ANDREW JOHNSON, M. D., Omaha, Nebr 1918 

Consul LAWRENCE LOUIS MALM, Cleveland, Ohio 1918 

Rev. JOSEPH ALFRED ANDERSON, A. M., Boxholm, Iowa 1919 

Mr. JOHN HENRY HAUBERG, A. B., LL. B., Rock Island, 111 1919 

Mr. KNUT THEODORE ANDERSON, Rock Island, 111 1919 

Rev. GOTTFRED NELSON, Chicago, 111 1919 

Rev. ERIC PETER OLSSON, D. D., Courtland, Kans 1920 

Rev. JOHAN FREDERICK SEEDOFF, Rockford, 111 1920 

Judge LEONARD TELLEEN, Cambridge, 111 1920 

Mr. BYRON LINDGREN, Minneapolis, Minn 1920 

Rev. AMANDUS FRIDOLF BERGSTROM, Moline, 111 1921 

Rev. CARL ALFRED LUND, Escanaba, Mich 1921 

Mr. NILS ANTON NELSON, Chicago, 111 1921 

Mr. CHARLES JOHN EKFELT, Ottumwa, Iowa 1921 

OFFICERS 

Rev. JOS. A. ANDERSON, Boxholm, Iowa, President. 
Rev. A. THEO. EKBLAD, Superior, Wis., Secretary. 
Prof. ANDREW KEMPE, Rock Island, 111., Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. JOS. A. ANDERSON, Pres. Prof. ANDREW KEMPE, ex officio. 

Dr. G. A. ANDREEN, ex officio. Rev. A. F. BERGSTROM. 

Mr. JOHN H. HAUBERG. Rev. J. F. SEEDOFF. 

Mr. K. THEO. ANDERSON, Sec'y. Mr. C. J. EKFELT. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Faculty and Instructors 

Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

731— 35th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Vice President. 

741 — 34th St. 



Rev. ADOLF HULT, B. D., 

Secretary of the General Faculty. 



CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Economics. 



1739— 11th Ave.. Moline 



3808— 8th Ave. 



CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Cor. 9th Ave. and 34th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 

741— 34th St. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D.D., R.N.O., 

Professor Emeritus of Church History, Pastoral Theology, etc. 



608— 38th St. 



Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D.D., LL.D., R.N.O., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Apologetics and Church Polity. 



3826— 7th Ave. 



Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. CARL OTTO GRANERE, Ph.D., 

Librarian Emeritus. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 



1311— 38th St. 



937— 43rd St. 



LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

626— 38th St. 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

970— 38th St. 

l ) Duties performed during the year by Prof. A. D. Udden and Dr. L. Ostrom. 



6 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, and Evangelistics. 

825— 35th St. 

Rev. SVEN GUSTAP YOUNGERT, Ph.D., D.D., 

Professor of Philosophy, Theological Propedeutics, Biblical Introduction, Catechetics 

and Liturgies. 

960— 38th St. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

842— 44th St. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

2829— 11 }£ Ave. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A.M., 

Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Flomiletics. 

1010— 38th St. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

1647— 37th St. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc. B., Ph.B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3906— 7th Ave. 

PETER WILLIAM BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3922 — 8th Ave. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M. Accts., LL.B., 

Principal of Commercial Department. Professor of Commerce, College. 

3932— 8th Ave. 

JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A.A.G.O., 

Director of Conservatory of Music, Professor of Piano, Organ and Theory, and Director of 
Handel Oratorio Chorus and Wennerberg Male Chorus. 

1000— 38th St. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy, Instructor in Education and Spanish in College. 

1418— 33rd St. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Professor of Church History, Symbolics, Biblical and Pastoral Theology and Hymnology. 

1739— 11th Ave., Moline 



OLOP GRAPSTR6M, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

831— 44th St 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Professor of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

727— 19th St. 



AUGTTSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 7 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music. Director of Orchestra. 

3906 — 7th Ave. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B.S., 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. Instructor in Commercial Arithmetic and 
Preparatory United States History. 

1408— 16th Ave. 

EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

1428— 12th St., Moline 

ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL.B., M.Accra., 

Instructor in Penmanship, Bookkeeping, Banking, Advanced Accounting, Arithmetic 
and Typewriting. 

4211— 7th Ave. 

ARVID SAMUELSON, 

Professor of Piano, Advanced Piano Pedagogy, and Director of Oriole Club. 

1726— 28th St. 

IVAR SOPHUS SKOUGAARD, A.B., 

Professor of Voice. 

828— 28th St. 

ANTON DAVID UDDEN, A.B., 

Professor of Biology, Geology, Physics and Astronomy, Fall term. 

4316— 9th Ave. 

JAMES FRANKLIN PAGE, B.Pd., B. Ph., A.M., 

Assistant Professor of English. 

3906— 7th Ave. 

LOUIS OSTROM, A.B., M.D., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, Spring term. 

1037 — 21st St. 

WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 

Instructor in Public School Music, Piano, and Harmony. 

902 — 5th Ave., Moline 

ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Instructor in Piano. 

715— 3rd St., Moline 
ALTHEA BROWN, 
Instructor in Voice. 

1202— 12th St., Moline 
KARL GOTTFRID LARSON, A.B., 
Instructor in Natural Science, Academy. 

707— 38th St. 
OTTO HENRY BOSTRoM, A.M., Ph.D., 

Instructor in History, Academy. 

3814— 7th Ave. 
MAMIE MELINDA JOHNSON, 

Acting Librarian. 

2851— 7th Ave. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AXD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

ELMER THEODORE PETERSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Latin, German, Civics, and History, Academy. 

LAURA ANNETTE ANDERSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Spring term. 

LEROY CARLSON 

Assistant in Piano. 

CARL GEORGE ENGDAHL, A.B., 

Teaching Assistant in Christianity, Academy. 

SIMON EMANUEL FAGERSTROM, 

Teaching Assistant in German, Academy. 

ADOLPH EMIL THEODORE FANT, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic, Spring term. 

VIRGILIUS THURE ANSELM FERM, 

Director of Band. 



VERA CELESTIA HOVEY, 

Instructor in Shorthand, Commercial English, and Office Training. 



707— 38th St. 



3908— 8th Ave. 



Dormitory 



1011— 44th St. 



Dormitory 



4121— 7 th Ave. 



Dormitory 



624— 36th St. 

FREDA ELIZABETH MATTSON, 

Student Assistant in Piano. 

4121— 7th Ave. 

HELEN JANET MILLER, 

Teaching Assistant in Mathematics, Academy, Spring term. 

1218— 3rd Ave. 

Rev. WALTER TILLBERG, A.B., B.D., 

Teaching Assistant in Christianity, Academy, Spring term. 

1440— 14th St., Moline 

RUBY EVELYN JOHNSON, 

Ladies' Swimming Instructor. 

HUGO CHRISTIAN LARSON, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Fall term. 

JOSEPH EMANUEL LIND, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Spring term. 

HARRY EDGAR OLSON, 

Assistant in Zoology. 

ERIC HERBERT WAHLSTROM, 

Assistant in Physics, Academy. 

Dormitory 



3103— 15th St., Moline 



3906— 8th Ave. 



1124— 38th St. 



4121— 7th Ave. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Officers and Standing Committees 

Matriculation Committee in Seminary — Rev. Dr. L. A. Johnston, Presi- 
dent of the Augustana Synod, Rev. Dr. G. A. Brandelle, Vice President 
of Synod, Rev. Jos. A. Anderson, Secretary of Synod, Pres. G. A. An- 
dreen, Professors C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Secretary), S. G. 
Youngert, C. J. Sodergren, and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Appointments — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren, S. G. Youngert, C. J. Soder- 
gren, S. J. Sebelius (Secretary), and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Students' Aid — President G. A. Andreen, Professors 
C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Treasurer), S. G. Youngert, C. J. Soder- 
gren, Adolf Hult (Secretary), C. W. Foss, C. L. E. Esbjorn, J. Mauritz- 
son (Chairman), and S. J. Sebelius (Vice Chairman). 

Library and Museum Committee — President G. A. Andreen (Chair- 
man), Miss Mamie Johnson (Secretary), Professors C. J. Sodergren, J. 
Mauritzson, Adolf Hult, and A. W. Kjellstrand. 

Library Staff — Miss Mamie Melinda Johnson, Acting Librarian; Dru- 
silla Vera Erickson, Library assistant; Simon Pagerstrom, Gerald An- 
derson and Hilvy Ryden, student Library assistants. 

Board of Control of Public Meetings — President G. A. Andreen 
(Chairman), Professors C. J. Sodergren (Secretary), I. M. Anderson, 
J. Victor Bergquist, and A. Kempe. 

Board of Control of Athletics — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors C. A. Blomgren, L. W. Kling, A. R. Wallin, A. Kempe (Treas- 
urer), Messrs. Joseph Lind, Clarence Blomberg, R. M. Conrad (Mana- 
ger), and Julius Johnson (Secretary). 

Board of Control of Forensics — President G. A. Andreen, Prof. A. 
Kempe, Rev. A. P. Bergstrom, Dr. E. P. Bartholomew, Dr. C. W. Poss, 
Blanche Searle (Secretary), Simon Fagerstrom, James Pitzpatrick, and 
J. A. Elson. 

Curator of Archives — Prof. C. W. Foss. 

Acting Librarian and Curator of Museum — Miss Mamie Johnson. 

Secretary of General Faculty — Prof. Adolf Hult. 

Secretary of Theological Faculty — Prof. C. J. Sodergren. 

Secretary of College Faculty — Prof. A. R. Wallin. 

Secretary of Conservatory Faculty — Miss Althea Brown. 

Secretary of Commercial Faculty — Prof. A. Milton. 

Class Guardians in Seminary — Senior: Prof. C. J. Sodergren; Middle: 
Prof. C. A. Blomgren; Junior: Prof. A. Hult. 

Class Guardians in College and Academy — Senior: Prof. S. J. Sebe- 



10 AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMIXAEY 

lius; Junior: Prof. E. F. Bartholomew; Sophomore: Prof. C. W. Foss; 
Freshman: Prof. C. L. Esbjorn; Fourth Class: Prof. L. W. Kling; Third 
Class: Prof. W. E. Cederberg; Second Class: Prof. A. R. Wallin; First 
and Preparatory Class: Prof. A. W. Kjellstrand. 

Class Guardians in Conservatory — Prof. J. Victor Bergquist and Miss 
Althea Brown. 

Class Guardians in Commercial Department — Prof. A. Kempe and 
Miss Vera Hovey. 

Committee on Absences, Seminary — Prof. A. Hult. 

Committee on Absences, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. E. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Absences, Commercial Department — Prof. A. Milton. 

Committee on Absences, Conservatory Department — Prof. J. Victor 
Bergquist. 

Enrolling Officer and Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. E. 
Esbjorn. 

Assistant Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. Peter Benzon. 

Schedule Committee, College and Academy — Professors W. E. Ceder- 
berg and C. L. E. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Student Organizations, General Faculty — Professors 
J. Mauritzson, C. J. Sodergren, and J. Victor Bergquist. 

Committee on Student Organizations, College and Academy — Profes- 
sors C. L. E. Esbjorn, A. W. Kjellstrand, and I. M. Anderson. 

Committee on Curriculum, College — Professors C. L. E. Esbjorn, L. 
W. Kling, and W. E. Cederberg. 

Committee on Scholar ships — Professors C. W. Foss, S. J. Sebelius, and 
P. Benzon. 

Committee on Rules, College and Academy — Prof. L. W. Kling. 

Editor of Catalog — Pres. G. A. Andreen. 

Principal of Ladies' Hall — Mrs. Olive Rydholm. 

Matron — Mrs. Hilda Watson. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 



General Statement 



Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned and supported 
by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod of North America. While 
it is, therefore, a denominational institution, and as such aims to serve, 
primarily, the interests of the Lutheran Church, it is not sectarian in 
any narrow sense of the term. It throws its doors open to all who 
desire a liberal education based upon the Christian religion and perme- 
ated by the Christian spirit. Its original scope, which was that of a 
school for the education of ministers of the gospel, has from time to 
time been broadened, so that at the present time the institution, while 
retaining the Theological Seminary as a university department, aims 
to prepare, directly or indirectly, for all occupations and professions, 
by giving, in a variety of departments, the general culture or special 
training which modern conditions require. Its courses of instruction 
are patterned after the most modern and approved models, and qualita- 
tively, at least, Augustana College aims to be in the front rank of 
American institutions of learning. The English language is used as a 
medium of instruction in all subjects, except the Swedish language 
and literature, and some of the theological branches. The subject of 
Swedish, however, naturally occupies a prominent position in the 
curriculum. Indeed the most ample facilities are provided for the study 
of the language, history and literature of the Northland. This not 
only because the institution is mindful both of its origin and of its 
future mission as an exponent of Swedish-American culture, but because 
it studies to supply the present day practical needs of its students. 

All the departments of the institution, except the Theological Semi- 
nary, are open to students of both sexes. 

The location of the institution is such as to leave little to be desired 
on the score of accessibility, healthfulness, and beauty of surroundings. 
It is the object of the management to throw about the student all the 
influences which favor a healthy and harmonious physical, mental, and 
moral development. 



12 AUGTJSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Departments and Courses 



The institution comprizes the following eight Departments or 
Schools : 

I. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, in which boys and girls 
deficient in common school branches are prepared for admission to the 
Academy. 

II. THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT has in view the twofold object, 
first, of preparing students for entering College, and, secondly, of afford- 
ing young men and women whose circumstances do not permit their 
taking a college course the opportunity of acquiring a more complete 
general education than can be obtained in the common schools. 

III. THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT is designed to give the 
systematic discipline in liberal studies usually required for the bacca- 
laureate degree. The curriculum is arranged on a combined "group" 
and elective system, and the degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
all who successfully complete the course of study in any group of this 
department. 

IV. THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT is designed to prepare for 
teaching in public or parochial schools. See College Department: 
Education and Teachers' Certificates. 

V. THE THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT affords instruction and 
training in all the theoretical and practical subjects entering into a 
proper preparation for the gospel ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

VI. THE POST-GRADUATE DEPARTMENT offers courses leading 
to advanced degrees in literary and scientific as well as theological 
studies, under the direction of the Collegiate and Theological Faculties 
respectively. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts, see Collegiate 
Department, Post-Graduate Courses. 

For courses leading to advanced theological studies, see Theological 
Seminary, Post-Graduate Courses. 

VII. THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND SCHOOL OF ART, 
the former of which embraces four distinct courses: Preparatory; a 
Teachers' Certificate course, extending usually over three years and 
designed to train teachers of music; a Diploma course of one additional 
year, designed to furnish a thoro musical education; and a Post- 
graduate course of two years, intended for those who desire to pursue 
higher musical studies. In the School of Art instruction is given in 



AUGTJSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 

Drawing and various branches of Painting, and also in Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 

VIII. THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT affords young men and 
women opportunities for acquiring a thoro business training under 
Christian influences. The courses of study are the same as those of 
other first-class business colleges. The course in Phonography and 
Typewriting aims principally to fit young men and women for posi- 
tions as stenographers or private secretaries. The instruction is indi- 
vidual, and so suited to the peculiarities of each student as to bring 
out the best results possible. The course in Penmanship is designed 
to meet the requirements of those who wish to become teachers of pen- 
manship and pen art, or who desire to obtain positions as policy writers, 
designers, engrossers, etc. 



14 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 



The Collegiate, Academic and 
Preparatory Departments 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Economics. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D. 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 



Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Chemistry. Physics, Spring term. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc.B., Ph. B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. Astronomy, Spring term. 

PETER WILLIAM BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. Geology, Spring term. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy, and Instructor in Education and Spanish in College. 
*) Duties performed during year by Prof. A. D. Udden and Dr. L. Ostrom. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 15 

OLOP GRAFSTRSM, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Professor of Elocution and Public Speaking, 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M.Accts., LL.B. 

Professor of Commerce, College. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B.S., 

Director of Gymnastics and Athletics. Instructor in Preparatory U. S. History, Fall term. 

EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

ANTON DAVID UDDEN, A.B., 

Professor of Biology, Geology, Physics, and Astronomy, Fall term. 

JAMES FRANKLIN PAGE, B.Pn., B.Ph., A.M., 

Assistant Professor of English. 

LOUIS OSTROM, A.B., M.D., 

Assistant Professor of Zoology, Spring term. 

KARL GOTTPRID LARSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Natural Science, Academy. 

OTTO HENRY BOSTR6M, A.M., Ph.D., 

Instructor in History, Academy. 

ELMER THEODORE PETERSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Latin, German, Civics, and History, Academy. 

LAURA ANNETTE ANDERSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Spring term. 

CARL GEORGE ENGDAHL, A.B., 

Teaching Assistant in Christianity, Academy, part of Spring term. 

SIMON EMANUEL FAGERSTROM, 

Teaching Assistant in German, Academy. 

ADOLPH EMIL THEODORE FANT, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic, Spring term. 

HELEN JANET MILLER, 

Teaching Assistant in Mathematics, Academy, Spring term. 

REV. WALTER TILLBERG, A.B., B.D., 

Teaching Assistant in Christianity, Academy, part of Spring term. 

HUGO CHRISTIAN LARSON, 

Assistant in Chemistry,' Fall term. 

JOSEPH EMANUEL LIND, 

Assistant in Chemistry, Spring term. 



16 AUGUST AN A COLLEGE 

HARRY EDGAR OLSON, 

Assistant in Zoology. 

ERIC HERBERT WAHLSTROM, 

Assistant in Physics, Academy, 

RUBY EVELYN JOHNSON, 

Ladies' Swimming Instructor. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Applicants for admission must furnish satisfactory evidence of good 
moral character and of such scholarship as will enable them successfully 
to pursue the courses of study in the classes to which they are assigned. 
Students coming from other institutions, whether high schools, acad- 
emies, or colleges, should present a properly certified, detailed state- 
ment of their work at such institutions. This statement, for which a 
blank will be furnished on application, should, if possible, be in the 
hands of the President of the institution before the fifteenth day of 
August in case the student expects to enter in September, and before 
the fifteenth day of December when the student expects to enter in the 
following January. It is desirable that a catalog of the institution 
attended should accompany the credits. 

THE ACADEMY 
For admission to the Academy an ordinary common-school education 
is required. Applicants for admission deficient in the common-school 
branches will be assigned to the Preparatory Department. 

THE COLLEGE 
A candidate will be admitted into the Freshman class upon presenta- 
tion of fifteen entrance units as denned by the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, viz.: 

English 3 units 

One Foreign Language 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Science 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

Electives 6 units 



Total 15 units 

• The electives must be made up from the subjects in the list below. 
No subject is accepted for an amount less than the minimum or greater 
than the maximum mentioned in the list, and not more than four units 
'may be offered in vocational subjects. 



augustana college 17 

Elective Units 
Christianity will be credited hour for hour. Maximum of 

credits allowed 14 credits 

Civics , y 2 or 1 unit 

Drawing. Art Drawing y 2 unit 

Mechanical Drawing y 2 to 2 units 

Elocution y 2 unit 

Economics V2 unit 

English y 2 or 1 unit 

Foreign Language. French 1 to 4 units 

German 1 to 4 units 

Greek 1 to 3 units 

Latin 1 to 4 units 

History y 2 to 3 units 

History of Education y 2 unit 

Mathematics. Algebra, Advanced 1 unit 

Arithmetic, Commercial or Advanced.... % to 1 unit 

Geometry, Solid and Spherical y 2 unit 

Trigonometry, Plane V 2 unit 

Music V 2 or 1 unit 

Pedagogy y 2 unit 

Psychology y 2 unit 

Science. Astronomy y 2 unit 

Botany y 2 or 1 unit 

Chemistry y 2 or 1 unit 

Geology % unit 

Physics 1 unit 

Physiography % or 1 unit 

Physiology % or 1 unit 

Zoology y 2 or 1 unit 

Swedish 1 to 4 units 

Vocational Subjects 

Advanced Accounting , y 2 to 2 units 

Agriculture y 2 to 2 units 

Bookkeeping y 2 to 2 units 

Commercial Geography y 2 to 2 units 

Commercial Law ,. . y 2 to 2 units 

Domestic Science y 2 to 2 units 

Elementary Law , y 2 to 2 units 

Manual Training y 2 to 2 units 

Stenography and Typewriting y 2 to 2 units 

Group Prerequisites 
The electives should include the "prerequisites" of the group the 
student wishes to enter. (See the statement of group requirements 

College Catalog. 2. 



18 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

under Outline of Courses of Study, College). A candidate lacking any 
of these prerequisites will have the opportunity of making them up in 
the Academy. 

ADVANCED CREDITS 
No advanced credits will be given to candidates for admission to 
College, except 

1) for work of a distinctively college grade, in which case the candi- 
date must pass an examination in such work upon entering College; 
and 

2) for the work done by graduates of our own Academy in excess of 
the 15 units required for admission into College, for which extra 
work 10 college credits will be allowed. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATES 
Applicants furnishing certificates of work successfully completed at 
any institution of a grade equal to that of Augustana College or at any 
high school or academy on the accredited list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be given credit for 
such work without examination. In all other cases applicants for 
admission will be admitted by examination or on probation. No student 
will be received into the Freshman class who lacks more than 1 unit 
in the number of the required entrance credits. All entrance conditions 
must be removed within a year. For dates of examination for admis- 
sion see Calendar, page 3. 

SELECT COURSES 
Students who do not wish to take a full course may select such 
studies in any department as they are prepared to pursue to advantage. 
But all such select courses are subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

ENROLMENT 

Students are not enrolled in any department of instruction until they 
have registered in the President's office, and have paid their tuition 
for the term in the Treasurer's office. 

Applicants may be received at any time, but attendance at the opening 
of each term must be considered the rule, as work in all classes begins 
promptly on the first day, and students coming later are at a great 
disadvantage. 

CHRISTIANITY 
Every student is required to pursue the study of Christianity during 
each term of his residence at the institution. But no student is re- 
quired to make up any courses in Christianity below the class in which 
he is first enrolled. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 19 

SWEDISH 

A very full course in the Swedish language and literature may be 
taken in connection with each of the groups in College. 

It should not, however, be inferred that a student must either take 
no Swedish at all or else the entire course. He may take up any course 
for which he is properly qualified and may then discontinue the study 
at the end of any complete course. 

It should be added that for the benefit of high school graduates and 
other students coming from schools where no opportunity has been 
offered for the study of Swedish, a three hour course in Swedish Gram- 
mar will be given thruout the first year in College, thus affording a 
reasonably thoro, tho brief, preparation for the study of Swedish litera- 
ture. Students of Swedish parentage are urged to devote as much time 
as possible to the study of the language of their forefathers. Senti- 
mental considerations aside, the practical advantages of such study to 
the clergyman, the teacher, the physician, the lawyer, the business 
man, the cultured man in any walk of life, are sufficiently obvious 
without being specially pointed out. 



20 



AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE 



Outline of Courses of Study 



Note. In the following schedules the numeral in parenthesis after 
each subject denotes the number of the course as described under 
"Courses of Instruction" (pp. 25 and ff.). The other numeral after each 
subject denotes the number of "credits" for the course in question and 
corresponds to the number of recitations in the subject per week for 
one term — two hours of laboratory work, drawing, or elocution counting 
the same as one recitation. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



FALL TEEM 






SPBIXG TEEM 




Bible Readings (1) 


2 




Bible Readings (2) 


2 


Arithmetic (1) 


5 




Arithmetic (2) 


5 


English (1) 


5 




English (2) 


5 


Geography (1) 


3 




Geography (2) 


3 


Penmanship (1) 


2 




Penmanship (2) 


2 


U. S. History (1) 


5- 


-22 


U. S. History (2) 


5—22 




ACADEMY 






FIRST CLASS 




EALL TEEM 






SPBIXG TEEM 




Bible Geography (3) 


2 




Bible Geography (4) 


1 


Algebra (3) 


5 




Algebra (4) 


5 


English (3) 


4 




English (4) 


5 


Latin (3) 


5 




Latin (4) 


5 


Physiography (3) 


4- 


-20 


Botany (4) 


4—20 






SECOND CLASS 



FALL TEEM 

Biblical Biography (5) 1 

General History (5) 5 

English (5) or Swedish (5) 4 

Latin (5) 5 



Plane Geometry (5) 



SPBIXG TEEM 

Biblical Biography (6) 1 

General History (6) 5 

English (6) or Swedish (6) 4 

Latin (6) 5 



5—20 Plane Geometry (6) 



5—20 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 21 

THIRD CLASS 

FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

Bible Teachings (7) 1 Bible Teachings (8) 1 

English (7) 4 English (8) 4 

Any three of the following: Any three of the following: 

Latin (7) 5 Latin (8) 5 

German (7) 5 German (8) 5 

Algebra (7) 5 Solid Geometry (8) 5 

Zoology (7) 5 Physiology (8) 5 

Physics (7) 5—20 Physics (8) 5—20 

FOURTH CLASS 

FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

History of Missions (9) 1 History of Missions (10) 1 

English (9) 4 English (10) 4 

Any three of the following: Any three of the following: 



Latin (9) 5 




Latin (10) 


5 


German (9) 5 




German (10) 


5 


Chemistry (9) 5 




Chemistry (10) 


5 


Catechetical Training (9b) 5 




Swedish (10) 


5 


Civics (9) 5- 


-20 


United States History (10) 


5—20 



GRADUATION PROM THE ACADEMY 
The completion of the following units is required for graduation from 
the Academy: 

English 3 

Latin 2 

Algebra 1 

Geometry 1 

Science 1 

History 1 

Elective 7 

Total 16=160 credits. 
The regular (not elective) courses in Christianity are also required, 
except that no student is required to make up any courses in Chris- 
tianity below the class in which he is first enrolled. 

COLLEGE 

The studies offered in the College are arranged in ten parallel courses 
or "groups" with leading subjects as follows: 
I. Classical Languages. 
II. Modern Languages. 

III. Latin and Science. 

IV. Physical Science. 



22 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

V. Biological Science. 
VI. Mathematics. 
VII. English. 
VIII. History. 
IX. Education. 
X. Commerce. 
The groups are assumed to be equally difficult and honorable and are 
designed to promote specialization along some particular line of study 
of the student's own choice, while at the same time insisting upon 
certain fundamental disciplines with which it is believed every educated 
man of the present day should be familiar. 

The following requirements in Science and Foreign Language apply 
to all the groups: 

General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language. 

A. Science. A student who presents less than two units of science 
for admission must earn not less than six college credits in science. 

B. Foreign Language. A student who presents less than four units 
of foreign language for admission is required to take two years of 
foreign language in college. Those offering four or more units for 
admission are required to take one year in college. 

I. The Classical Group. 
Prerequisite: four units of Latin. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History— Greek (11), Roman (12) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Greek (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 28 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Christianity and electives 68 






120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

II. The Modern Language Group. 
Prerequisite: two units of German. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History— Medieval (13), Modern (14) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

German (11), (12), (13), (14) 16 

French (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 26 

Christianity and electives 60 

120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 23 

III. The Latin-Science Group. 

Prerequisites: four units of Latin, one unit of Chemistry, and one unit 

of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 

Biology (11), (12), or (21), (22) 8 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 72 

120 
IV. The Physical Science Group. 

Prerequisites: one unit of Physics, one unit of Chemistry, and one-half 
unit of Advanced Algebra. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12), (13), (14), (23), (24) 24 

Physics (21), (22), (23), (24) 10 

Mathematics (11), (12) K 8 

Christianity and electives 60 



120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

V. The Biological Science Group. 

Prerequisites: one unit of Physics, one unit of Chemistry, and one unit 

of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Drawing (Biological) (15), (16) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 

Biology (11), (12), (21), (22) 16 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and Electives 70 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



24 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

VI. The Mathematical Group. 

Prerequisites: a half unit of Advanced Algebra and a half unit of Solid 

and Spherical Geometry. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Drawing (Mechanical) (15), (16) 4 

Mathematics (11), (12), (17), (18), (21), (22), also (23), 

(24), or (25), (26), or (27), (28) 28 

Physics (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 62 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VII. The English Group. 

English (11), (12), (13), (14), (17), (18), (2']), (24), (25;, 

(26), (27), (28) 30 credits 

History— English (15) , American (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) 2 

Christianity and electives 82 " 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VIII. The History Group. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (21), (22) or 

(24), (25), (26) 30 " 

Elocution (11) ,-( 12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Economics (21) , (22) 6 

Christianity and electives 72 " 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

IX. The Education Group. 

Prerequisite: a half unit of Civics. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (13), (14), (16) 9 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Psychology (11) 3 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 25 

Education (12), (13), (14), (21), (22), (23), (24) 23 

Christianity and electives 73 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

X. The Commercial Group. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Commerce (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (21), (22), 

(23), (24), (25), (26), (27), (28) 38 " 

Psychology (11) 3 

Economics (21), (22) 6 

Christianity and electives 55 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



The following courses of study are numbered by terms, the school 
year being divided into two terms, Fall and Spring. The odd numbers 
designate the Fall term courses and the even numbers those of the 
Spring term. Courses 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 are the Fall term courses of the 
Preparatory class, the First, the Second, the Third, and the Fourth 
classes of the Academy, respectively, while the numbers 2, 4, 6, 8, and 
10 indicate the Spring term courses of the same classes. In College, 
Freshman and Sophomore courses are numbered from 11 to 20, and 
Junior and Senior courses are numbered from 21 up. No elective course 
will be given unless a sufficient number of students apply for the same. 

ASTRONOMY 
COLLEGE 

21. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Reading of text-book; lectures; practise in the identification 
of constellations and stars and in the finding of the positions of 
the members of the solar system, and in the use of a small tele- 
scope. 1 hour. 

22. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Continuation of Course 21. 1 hour. 



26 ArGirsxAXA college 

23. Sphebical AJfiu Theobettcal Astronomy. 

Time, latitude, and longitude determination. The elements of 
celestial mechanics. Prerequisites: Mathematics 18, 21; Astron- 
omy 21, 22. 2 hours. 

24. Sphebical and Theobetical Astronomy. 

Continuation of Course 23. 2 hours. 

BIOLOGY 
For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 

4. Elementary Botany. 

Reading of text-books; examinations of a series of types of 
the larger divisions of the plant kingdom; a brief course in the 
general classification of plants; drills in descriptive terminology 
by means of charts; determination of seventy-five species of 
phenogams. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

7. Elementary Zoology. 

Recitations from a text-book and lectures on elementary mor- 
phology; dissection of ten or twelve types, vertebrates and in- 
vertebrates; determination of about 200 museum specimens. 
Should be elected by all who wish to take Advanced Zoology. 
Three hours recitations and two periods of two hours each lab- 
oratory work. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

5. Elementary Physiology. 

Text-book recitations, lectures, and demonstrations. The labo- 
ratory work will supplement the recitations with experin 
dissections, and the examination of anatomical preparations and 
models. 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

COLLEGE 

11. INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY. 

Recitations, lectures, reference reading and laboratory work 
upon the morphology, physiology and life history of the principal 
types of invertebrate animals. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

12. Vertebrate Zoology. 

Recitations, lectures, reference reading and laboratory work 
upon the morphology, physiology and life history of the principal 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 27 

types of vertebrates. The comparative anatomy of various types 
will also be considered. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

21. Physiological Botany. 

Recitations, lectures and reading of reference works; qualita- 
tive and quantitative experiments upon the various physiological 
activities of plants. Applications of plant physiology to agri- 
culture will also be considered. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

22. Morphological Botany. 

Recitations, lectures and reference reading upon the structures 
and relationships of the various groups of the plant kingdom. 
The laboratory work will consist in staining and mounting and 
the examination of plant structures by microscopic methods. 

Two recitations, two laboratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

BOTANY 

See Biology. 

CHEMISTRY 

For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 
9 and 10. Elementary Chemistry. 

Class-room and laboratory work. 

This is a beginners' course designed to meet the requirements 
of those who can devote only one year to chemistry. It also 
serves as an introduction to a more systematic study of the 
subject. 

Three hours of class exercises and four hours of laboratory 
work thruout the year. Each course 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Inorganic Chemistry. 

This is a course in the fundamental principles of chemistry. 
The work is based on a course of laboratory experiments, from 
which the subject is developed and amplified by individual in- 
struction in the laboratory and class-room. Such texts as Alex- 
ander Smith's "General Chemistry for Colleges," or W. A. Noyes' 
"Inorganic Chemistry" indicate the scope of the work. 



28 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

Two hours lectures and recitations, four hours laboratory prac- 
tise thruout the year. Each course 4 credits. 
A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 

13. Qualitative Analysis. 

This course includes the chemistry involved in the analytical 
separations and tests of the common metals and acids, and a 
complete qualitative analysis of some commercial substances. 

Two hours lectures and recitations, four hours laboratory prac- 
tise during the first semester. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

14. Quantitative Analysis. 

The course comprises the quantitative analysis, by gravimetric 
and volumetric methods, of a few selected minerals and com- 
mercial substances. 

One hour lecture and recitation work, six hours laboratory 
practise during the second semester. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

21 and 22. Organic Chemistry. 

A theoretical and experimental study of the aliphatic and 
aromatic series of carbon compounds. Prerequisites: Courses 
11 and 12. 
Two hours recitations, four hours laboratory practise. 

Each course 4 credits. 
A laboratory fee is charged for these courses. 

23 and 24. Physical Chemistry. 

The gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter, stoichiometry, 
chemical and physical equilibria and the phase rule, chemical 
dynamics, thermochemistry, electrochemistry, actinochemistry. 
Prerequisites: Courses 11, 12, 13 and 14. 

Two hours recitations and lectures, four hours laboratory prac- 
tise thruout the year. Each course 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

25 and 26. Advanced Quantitative Analysis. 

Analysis of silicates, alloys, iron and steel, assay of gold and 
silver ores. 

Two 2-hour periods per week. Each course 2 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for these courses. 

CHRISTIANITY 

Instruction in the science of the Christian religion is intended to 
supply an essential element in a liberal education with a view to com- 
pleteness of character. Aside from its inherent worth and its bearing 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 29 

on the higher issues of life, it also aims to provide such information 
and to foster such principles as will enable the graduate to discharge 
the duties of Christian citizenship, and in every vocation to achieve 
something more than material success. 

PREPARATORY 

I and 2. Bible Readings. 

Text-book by Schmauk. Each course 2 hours. 

ACADEMY 
3 and 4. Bible Geography^ 

Geography of Palestine and other Bible lands, Babylonia, Egypt, 
Asia Minor, etc., in a historical setting. 
Text-book: Schmauk, Bible Geography. 

Course 3, 2 hours; Course 4, 1 hour. 

5 and 6. Biblical Biography. 

A study of the leading characters in the Bible. 

Text-book: Whitteker, Bible Geography. Each course 1 hour. 

7 and 8. Bible Teachings. 

An elementary course in Christian doctrine and morality. 
Text-book: Joseph Stump, Bible Teachings. Each course 1 hour. 

9 and 10. History of Foreign Missions. 

Text-books: Howe, A Brief History of Missions; Smith, The 
Uplift of China. Each course 1 hour. 

9b. Catechetical Training (elective). 

This course is designed especially for students who expect to 
teach in the parochial or Sunday schools of our Church. The 
course will contain the following features: Review of Catechism 
and Bible History; principles and methods of teaching; practical 
exercises. 

Text-book, lectures and notes. Given in Swedish. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

II and 12. Bible Literature. 

The course aims to set forth the story of the Bible as a whole; 
how its various books came to be written and what results they 
achieved; and, finally, how these books were preserved thru the 
centuries and thus handed down to us. Each course 1 hour. 

13 and 14. The Life of Christ. 

An historical study of the life and teaching of our Lord based 
on the four Gospels. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book. Notes. Two sections in 
English, one in Swedish. Each course 2 hours. 



30 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

21 and 22. Church History. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book. Notes and lectures. 
One section in English, one in Swedish. Each course 2 hours. 

23. Messages of the Prophets. 

A study of the social teachings of the Prophets. 

Recitations from text-book. Notes. 2 hours. 

Alternative: 

25. Christian Doctrine. 

The essentials of the doctrines of the Christian Religion. 
Text-book: Ullman, Kristlig religionslara. 2 hours. 

24. Messages of St. Paul. 

A study of select portions of the doctrinal letters of St. Paul, 
with special introduction to each letter; assigned topics for dis- 
cussion. 2 hours. 

Alternative : 

26. Christian Doctrine. 2 hours. 

28. Catechetical Training (elective). 

This course is designed especially for students who expect to 
teach in the parochial or Sunday schools of our Church. The 
course will contain the following features: History of Christian 
Education after the Reformation; review of Catechism and Bible 
History; principles and methods of teaching; practical exercises. 

Recitations from text-book. Lectures and notes. Given in 
Swedish. 2 hours. 

CIVICS 

See Political Science. 

COMMERCE 
COLLEGE 
11 and 12. The Mathematics of Investments. 

Interest and annuities; amortization of interest-bearing debts; 
valuation of bonds; sinking funds; depreciation; elements of life 
insurance. Each course 3 hours. 

13 and 14. Commercial Law. 

Contracts; negotiable instruments; agency; bailments; part- 
nership; corporations; personal property; real property; torts; 
suretyship, guaranty and insurance; management of decedents' 
estates; the intestate law, wills and trust estates; study of se- 
lected cases. Each course 2 hours. 






AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 31 

15 and 16. Advanced Accounting. 

The application of accounting to bookkeeping; study of balance 
sheets and trading and profit and loss statements; advanced 
forms of final statements; statements of affairs and deficiency- 
accounts; realization and liquidation; cost accounts; auditing; 
supplementary exercises are furnished for additional practise. 

Each course 3 hours 
21 and 22. Industrial History. 

Relation of commerce and industry to geography; commercial 
products; topography, climate and other physical conditions af- 
fecting the commercial progress of the several countries, and 
their productions, industries and commerce; the development of 
manufactures ; study of government reports. Each course 3 hours. 
Will not be given in 1918—19. 

23 and 24. Business Organization and Management. 

Economic environment; equipment; management; the labor 
force; record of the workers; record of raw material and finished 
and unfinished goods. Each course 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1918—19. 

25 and 26. American Government. 

A study of the organization and workings of American govern- 
ment in all its branches. Lectures, text-book and library read- 
ings. Each course 3 hours. 

Will not be given in 1918—19. 

27 and 28. Corporation and Trust Problems. 

The instruments of corporation finance; trading on the equity; 
watered stock; the market and the price; amortization; capitali- 
zation and the state; study of hypothetical cases. 

Each course 2 hours. 
Will not be given in 1918—19. 

DRAWING 
COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Pree-Hand Drawing. 

These courses include instruction in drawing, light and shade, 
portrait, landscape, composition, animals, fruits, flowers, etc.; in 
charcoal, crayon, and pencil. Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

13 and 14. Free-hand Drawing. 

These courses are a continuation of Courses 11 and 12. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 
For advanced courses in Drawing see School of Art. 



32 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

15 and 16. Biological Drawing. 

Exercises in shading and perspective. Diagrammatic drawing. 
Drawings illustrating the construction of the microscope. Micro- 
scopic drawing from mounted slides. 

Each course 2 hours, 1 credit. 

17 and 18. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

Lettering; principles of isometric, cabinet and orthographic 
projections with applications on plane sections and interesections 
of surfaces; sketches and working drawings. 
Required in the Mathematical group. 

Each course 4 hours, 2 credits. 
19 and 20. Descriptive Geometry. 

Theory of orthographic projection; discussion, proof, and 
graphic solution of theoretical and practical problems. 
Prerequisites: Drawing 17 and 18. 

Each course 4 hours, 2 credits. 

ECONOMICS 
COLLEGE 

21. Money and Banking. 

The first part of this course consists of a study of Money and 
Credit. The second part includes a study of the Principles of 
Banking, Banking in the U. S. and Foreign Banking Systems. 
Each student is required to prepare and read a paper on some 
topic in the course. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

22. Political Economy. 

The first part of the course is devoted to the principles of 
Political Economy, and the second part to the discussion of the 
questions relating to the practical application of these principles. 
Each student is required to prepare a paper on some economic 
subject. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

EDUCATION 
COLLEGE 

11. Psychology. 

See Philosophy 11. 3 hours. 

12. Principles of Teaching. 

Psychological principles of teaching, types of teaching, class- 
room management. Text-book, lectures, collateral reading, re- 
ports. 3 hours. 

13. History of Education. 

Development of educational aims and practises since days of 
Greece, with particular stress on time since Rousseau. 3 hours. 



augustana college 33 

14. Classroom Management. 

A study of the routine and judgment factors of Classroom Man- 
agement. The following are some of the problems that will be 
considered: routine and habit, the daily program, hygiene, disci- 
pline, and attention. 3 hours. 

21. Principles of Education. 

Consideration of the bases, aims, content, and values of educa- 
tion. Introduction to philosophy of education. Seminar on cur- 
rent educational problems and movements. 3 hours. 

22. Child Development. 

A survey of modern experimental studies dealing with phys- 
ical and mental growth from childhood to maturity. The facts 
so far determined will be presented with special reference to 
their meaning to the teacher. 

Prerequisites: Education 11 and 12. 3 hours. 

23. Secondary Education. 

The American High School, in regard to its organization, cur- 
riculum, methods of teaching. Comparative study of European 
systems. 4 hours. 

24. Educational Administration and Supervision. 

Study of the organization and management of the American 
public school system, in its relation to community as well as to 
educational theory. Educational measurements and surveys. 

4 hours. 

ELOCUTION 

COLLEGE 
11. Principles of Expression. 

A fundamental course in articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, 
principles of grouping, bodily expression and voice culture. 

2 hours, 1 credit. 

12 Public Speaking. 

This course includes the study of the principles of effective 
speaking and the delivery of extemporaneous speeches. 

2 hours, 1 credit. 

13. Literary Interpretation. 

An interpretative study is made of classical and contempor- 
aneous poetry and drama with reference to oral presentation. 
The voice is trained to express both thought and feeling. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11 and 12. 2 hours, 1 credit, 

Oellege Catalog. 3. 



34 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

14. Oratoby. 

The course in oratory includes the study and delivery of great 
orations. Each student is required also to present at least one 
original oration. 

Prerequisites: Courses 11, 12 and 13. 2 hours, 1 credit. 

ENGLISH 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Reading: Hawthorne's Tangleivood Tales; Spelling; Practical 
Exercises in sentence writing. Each course 5 hours. 

For those unable to speak and read the English language a 
more elementary course will also be given. The number of hours 
and the character of the instruction in this course will depend 
upon the needs of the students assigned to it. 

ACADEMY 

3. GRAMMAR. 

Review of the essentials of English grammar; Irving's Sketch 
Book; Selected short stories from other authors. 4 hours. 

4. Elementary Composition. 

Oral and written exercises in Description and Narration. 
Readings: Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales; Selections from Amer- 
ican poets. 5 hours. 

5. Elementary Composition. 

Oral and written exercises in Exposition and Argumentation. 
Readings: Franklin's Autobiography ; Lady of the Lake. Written 
reports on assigned topics. 4 hours. 

6. Historical Etymology and Literature. 

Textbook on Etymology; Analysis of from 500 to 800 Latin, 
Greek, and Anglo-Saxon derivatives with written exercises in 
their use. Readings: Webster's Bunker Hill Orations; Roger de 
Coverly Papers. Written reports on assigned readings. 4 hours. 

7. Composition and Literature. 

Letter writing, Figures of Speech, Poetry and Versification. 
Readings: Two plays of Shakespeare; Vision of Sir Launfal; 
Ancient Mariner. Written reports on assigned topics. 4 hours. 

8. Advanced Course in English Grammar. 

Study of the English sentence; its analysis and structure. Se- 
lections from authors studied with special reference to these 
points. 4 hours. 






augustana college 35 

9. American Literature. 

History of American Literature. Study of American authors, 
with analyses and written reports on assigned readings. 

4 hours. 

10. History of English Literature. 

Text-book course, supplemented by lectures; written reports on 
assigned readings; two book reports. 4 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Composition and Rhetoric. 

Elements of writing — words, sentences, paragraphs, whole 
compositions — are studied. Text-book, individual conferences, 
study of literary productions with regard to these elements, and 
frequent themes. 

Required in all groups. 3 hours. 

12. Composition and Rhetoric. 

The forms of discourse — description, narration, exposition, 
argumentation and persuasion. Text-book, illustrative material. 
Daily themes. Qualities of style. 

Required in all groups. 3 hours. 

13. Anglo-Saxon. 

The Phonology and Inflection of Anglo-Saxon will first be stud- 
ied. After a few selective readings in the Anglo-Saxon, Beowulf 
will be taken up and read as far as time will allow. One hour 
per week will be given to composition and rhetoric, continuing 
course 12. 

Required in the English Group. 4 hours. 

14. English Language. 

Selections from Lounsbury's History of the English Language, 
Trench, On the Study of Words, and Bradley's The Making of 
English, with especial reference to etymology and historical de- 
velopment of words. Part of this course will continue the com- 
position and rhetoric work. 

Required in the English Group. 4 hours. 

15. Argumentation and Debate. 

The theory of argumentation and debating. Study of specimens 

of argumentation, and exercises in brief drawing and debating. 

Elective. 2 hours. 

16. Practical Debating. 

Credit is given for practical work on Intercollegiate teams. 
Elective. 2 hours. 



36 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

17. English Literature. 

Survey of English poetry from Chaucer to the beginning of 
romanticism. At least one work of Chaucer, Spenser, Shake- 
speare, Dryden, and Pope will be studied. Lectures on the histor- 
ical development of English poetry during this period. 

Required in all groups. 2 hours. 

18. English Literature. 

The development of the English essay. Selections from the 
following authors are studied: Addison and Steele, Lamb, De 
Quincey, Macaulay, Carlyle, Ruskin, Arnold, Lowell, and Emerson. 
Lectures, tracing the historical development of the essay. 

Required in all groups. 2 hours. 

23. The Romantic Movement. 

Lectures on the history of romanticism. Discussion of the 
forces at work in the romantic movement. Reports on assigned 
topics. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

24. English Fiction. 

Lectures on the history, development, and significance of the 
English novel. Reports on assigned topics. Analysis of typical 
characters in fiction. Use of text-book. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

25. Epic Art. 

Lectures on Epic Art. Study of Milton's Paradise Lost. 
Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

26. Browning and Tennyson. 

Lectures. Critical and interpretative study of selected poems 
of Browning and Tennyson with special reference to the litera- 
ture of the Victorian period. Browning and Tennyson are sepa- 
rate courses, and are given alternate years. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

27. Dramatic Art. 

Lectures on dramatic art. Study of Shakespeare's plays. Anal- 
ysis of characters. Theses on assigned plays. Preparation of 
charts to illustrate the technique of the drama. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 

28. Literary Criticism. 

Lectures on the principles and science of criticism. Reports on 
assigned readings. 

Required in the English group. 2 hours. 



augustan a college 37 

29. English Seminab. 

Critical study of English and American masterpieces. Bio- 
graphical and critical theses. Elective. 2 hours. 

FRENCH 

COLLEGE 

11. Elementary French. 

Fraser and Squair's Shorter French Course, lessons I — XL; 
aural and oral work. Reading begun. 5 hours. 

12. Elementary French. 

Grammar lessons XLI — LII; irregular verbs; Bierman and 
Frank's Conversational French Reader completed. Reading of 
about 250 additional pages of easy French. 5 hours. 

13. Second Year French. 

Reading of 250 pages of modern texts; sight readings. Gram- 
mar continued. 4 hours. 

14. Second Year French. 

Reading of 250 pages of modern prose; one classical play; ex- 
ercises in conversation. 4 hours. 

21. Third Year French. 

Matzke's Primer of French Pronunciation. Corneille's Le Cid, 
Moliere's Le Misanthrope, Racine's Esther and Athalie. 300 pages 
of modern prose. 4 hours. 

22. Third Year French. 

Composition. Conversation. Vreeland and Michaud's Anthol- 
ogy of French Prose and Poetry. 500 pages of modern prose 

4 hours. 

GEOGRAPHY 

PREPARATORY 

1 and 2. Descriptive Geography. Each course 3 hours. 

GEOLOGY 

ACADEMY 
3. Physiography. 

Recitations from a suitable text-book; practical studies con- 
sisting of observations of weather changes and examinations of 
weather maps, study of topographic maps, and of local topog- 
raphy. 4 hours. 



38 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

COLLEGE 

21. Meteorology. 

Recitations from text-book; manipulation of meteorological 
instruments; study of cyclones and anticyclones from files of 
daily weather maps; tabulation of the elements of local weather 
and climate. 4 hours. 

22. Geology. 

Reading of a suitable text-book; lectures on the classification 
and genesis of the more common rocks, and land forms, with 
work in identifying the most common minerals, rocks and fossils; 
two or three field excursions. Desirable as preparation: Ele- 
mentary Zoology. 

Three hours of recitations; one period of two hours of labora- 
tory work. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

GERMAN 
ACADEMY 

7. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. 

Brief introductory survey of etymology, using Thomas' Prac- 
tical German Grammar. Reading of 100 pages of easy prose, 
with coincident special study of the German verb. Constant 
practise in pronunciation. 5 hours. 

8. ELEMENTARY GERMAN. 

Reading of 300 pages of easy modern prose. Grammar in close 
connection with reading. Special study of the German noun. 
Translation into German. 5 hours. 

9. Second Yeae German - . 

Composition. Reading of one play of Schiller. 5 hours. 

10. Second Y ea r German. 

Narrative prose. Modern plays. Colloquial German. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Third Year German. 

A drama of Schiller or Goethe. Modern narrative prose. 

4 hours. 

12. Third Year German. 

Modern narrative prose. Poll's German Prose Composition. 

4 hours. 

13. Fourth Year German. 

German conversation. Discussion of grammatical questions in 
German. Collateral reading of modern prose. 4 hours. 



augustana college 39 

14. Fourth Year German. 

Classical dramas. History of literature. German essays. Col- 
lateral reading of modern prose. 4 hours. 

GREEK 

COLLEGE 

11. First Year Greek. 

The most essential facts of the language; daily exercises in 
forms; the acquiring of a fair working vocabulary. The amount 
of work done is equivalent to the first fifty lessons in White's 
First Greek Book. 5 hours. 

12. First Year Greek. 

Course 11 continued. One book of the Anabasis carefully 
studied with special reference to mastery of forms and the fun- 
damental constructions. 5 hours. 

13. Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Books II — III of the Anabasis. The elements of Greek syntax 
studied in connection with the reading of the text, together with 
one exercise each week in Greek prose composition. 5 hours. 

14. (1) Xenophon's Anabasis; Composition. 

Continuation of course 13. Book IV of the Anabasis. 

(2) Homer. 

Introduction of the Epic dialect and to the Homeric hexameter. 
Books I and II of the Iliad or Odyssey. 5 hours. 

21. Homer. 

Continuation of course 14 (2). Books III — VI of the Iliad or 
their equivalent. 4 hours. 

22. Plato. 

The Apology carefully read, with a rapid reading of as many 
of the minor dialogs as time will permit. 4 hours. 

23. Oratory. 

Representative orations of Lysias and Demosthenes. 2 — 4 hours. 

25. Tragedy. 

Introduction to Greek tragedy, Euripides's Alcestis or Soph- 
ocles's Antigone. Outlines of history of Greek literature with 
special reference to the origin and development of the drama. 

2 — 4 hours. 



40 augustana college 

27. Hellenistic Geeek. 

Critical study of the Greek of this period; rapid reading of 
some of the historical portions of the New Testament or the 
Septuagint and careful study of some of the Pauline epistles. 

2 — 4 hours. 

Note. Courses 23, 25, 27 will be given in alternate years or at 
the option of the class. 

24. History. 

Selections from Thucydides and Herodotus. 2 — 4 hours. 

26. Advanced Course in Tragedy. 

Rapid reading of selected plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and 
Euripides. 2 — 4 hours. 

28. Hellenistic Greek. 

Continuation of course 27. 2 — 4 hours. 

Note. Courses 24, 26, 28 will be given in alternate years or 
at the option of the class. 



HISTORY 
PREPARATORY 
1 and 2. Elementary Course in United States. 

Each course 5 hours. 
ACADEMY 
5 and 6. Elementary Course in General History. 

Each course 5 hours. 

10. High School Course in United States History. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. History of Eastern Nations and Greece. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 

12. Roman History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 

13. History of Medieval Europe. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 

14. History of Modern Europe. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 

15. English History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 

16. American History. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 3 hours. 






augustana college 41 

21. History of Babylonia, Assyria, and Egypt. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

22. Advanced Course in Greek History. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

24. Advanced Course in Roman History.* 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

25. Constitutional History of England. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

26. Constitutional History of the United States. 

Open to Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 

LATIN 
ACADEMY 

3. First Year Latin. 

Daily recitations from a text-book. Special emphasis laid on 
forms, vocabularies, essentials of grammar, and correct pro- 
nunciation. • 5 hours. 

4. First Year Latin. 

Continuation of Course 3. Reading of connected prose. Vo- 
cabulary of about 500 words. 5 hours. 

5. Caesar. 

Rapid review of forms. Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles. Especial 
attention will be given to vocabularies. Grammar and compo- 
sition. 5 hours. 

6. Caesar. 

Commentaries, four books. Grammar and composition. Read- 
ing at sight; drill in vocabularies; memorizing of brief passages 
of text. Walker's Caesar will be used. 5 hours. 

7. Cicero. 

Two orations of Cicero. Review of forms; vocabularies; exer- 
cises in grammar and composition. Sight reading. 5 hours 

8. Cicero and Ovid. 

Three orations of Cicero. Reading at sight. Ovid's Metamor- 
phoses, about one thousand lines. Essentials of prosody and 
scansion; grammar and composition continued. 5 hours. 



* Not given in 1918 — 19. 



42 atjgustana college 

9. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, two books. Introduction to epic poetry; prosody- 
reviewed; scansion of text read; grammar and composition; 
translation at sight. 5 hours. 

10. Vergil. 

The Aeneid, four books. Grammar and composition. Outlines 
of classical mythology. Translation at sight. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 

11. Rapid review of essentials of grammar. Cicero's De Senectute. 

3 hours. 

12. A selection of Latin verse from Ennius to Boethius. 3 hours. 

Courses 11 and 12 are required in the classical group and as 
prerequisites for the following courses. 

13. Ltvy. 

Selections. 3 hours. 

14. Horace. 

Selections from the Epodes; the Odes, two books or equivalent. 
Study of lyric metres. 3 hours. 

21. Letters of Cicero. 

Rapid reading course. 2 hours. 

22. Roman Comedy. 

The Rudens and the Trinummus of Plautus. 2 hours. 

23. Latin Composition. 1 hour. 

24. Latin Composition. 

Continuation of Course 23. 1 hour. 

Of the college courses outlined above, Courses 13 and 14 will 
not be offered during the year 1918 — 19. 

Students desiring a recommendation to teach should complete 
with high standing at least two years of the reading courses out- 
lined above and in addition the year of Latin composition. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 
COLLEGE 
12. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work designed to give stu- 
dents systematic instruction in proper use of libraries. Course 
includes work in the following subjects: library methods, classi- 
fication, cataloging; book-binding and care of books; elementary 
book selection; general indexes; elementary reference; public 






AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 43 

documents; note-taking; investigation of a topic in a library; 
bibliography. By problems and other assigned work the student 
is brought in actual contact with the books and methods of the 
library. 3 hours. 

LOGIC 
See Philosophy. 

MATHEMATICS 
PREPARATORY 

1. Arithmetic. 

Review of fundamental rules and fractions; compound num- 
bers, including the metric system. 5 hours. 

2. Arithmetic 

Percentage; interest; ratio and proportion; involution and 
evolution; mensuration. 5 hours. 

ACADEMY 

3. Algebra. 

Fundamental rules, including synthetic division; factoring; 
common factors and multiples. 5 hours. 

4. Algebra. 

Fractions; equations containing fractions; systems of equa- 
tions; graphic solution of equations; involution and evolution; 
logarithms ; quadratic equations. 5 hours. 

5. Plane Geometry. 

Rectilinear figures and the circle; ratio and proportion; similar 
figures — three books. 5 hours. 

6. Plane Geometry. 

Areas of polygons and circles; regular polygons and circles — 
two books. 5 hours. 

7. Advanced Algebra. 

Review of quadratic equations, the graph, and logarithms; 
progression; compound interest and annuities; the binomial 
theorem; ratio and proportion; indeterminate equations. 5 hours. 

8. Solid and Spherical Geometry. 

Lines and planes in space; polyhedrons, cylinders, cones, and 
the sphere. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Elementary Mathematical Analysis. 

A course in algebra, trigonometry, and plane analytical ge- 
ometry. 



44 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

Prerequisites: One and one-half units of entrance algebra, and 
one unit of plane geometry. 

Required in the mathematical and in the physical science 
groups. Each course 4 hours. 

13 and 14. Algebra and Trigonometry. 

Elementary algebra including a study of graphs, followed by 
trigonometry. Intended for students who offer only one unit of 
entrance algebra, and one unit of plane geometry. 

Each course 3 hours. 

15 and 16. College Algebra. 

Courses supplementary to courses 11 and 12. 

Each course 2 hours. 

Prerequisites: One and one-half units of entrance algebra. 

Recommended to all students who take Mathematics 11 and 12. 

17 and 18. Calculus. 

An elementary course in calculus including solid analytic ge- 
ometry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12. Each course 2 hours. 

Required in the mathematical group. 

21. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. 4 hours. 

Required in the mathematical group. 

22. Advanced Calculus. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18, 21. 4 hours. 

Required in the mathematical group. 

Only two of the following courses are offered each term. 

23 and 24. Theory of Equations. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

25 and 26. Modern Geometry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

27 and 28. Differential Equations, 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. Each course 2 hours. 

29 and 30. Analytical Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 11, 12, 17, 18. 

Each course 2 or 3 hours. 

Spherical and Theoretical Astronomy. 
See Astronomy 23, 24. 



augustana college 45 

Surveying. 

See Surveying. 

Students in the mathematical group are required to take Mathe- 
matics 23—24, or 25—26, or 27—28. 

METEOROLOGY 

See Geology. 

MUSIC 

See Conservatory of Music. 

PEDAGOGY 

See Education. 

PHILOSOPHY 

11. Elementary Psychology. 

Study of text-book. Lectures. Practical applications to the 
principles of teaching and to human life. Required in the Edu- 
cation group. 3 hours. 

13. Liquor Problem. 

Lectures. Papers and class discussions on various phases of 
alcoholism. 1 hour. 

14. Liquor Problem. 

Continuation of Course 13. 1 hour 

21. Logic. 

Elements of deductive logic. Use of text-book. 2 hours. 

22. Psychology. 

Advanced course in psychology. Lectures. Use of text-book. 
Theses on assigned topics. 3 hours. 

23. Sociology. 

Lectures. Use of text-book. Study of social problems. Theses 
on assigned topics. 2 hours. 

24. Ethics. 

Lectures. Study of text-book. 2 hours. 

25. Esthetics. 

Lectures. Practical exercises in Art analysis. Study of pic- 
tures, statuary, buildings, landscapes, etc. 2 hours. 

26. History of Philosophy. 

General history of philosophy. Use of text-book. Lectures. 

3 hours. 



46 AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 

PHONETICS AND GENERAL LINGUISTICS 

COLLEGE 

21. The Physiology of speech sounds with applications to various lan- 

guages. 2 hours. 

22. General Linguistics. 2 hours. 

PHYSICS 
For laboratory fees see General Information. 

ACADEMY 
7 and 8. Elementary Physics. 

Three hours each week are given to lectures or recitations, and 
two periods, two hours each, to laboratory work. In the class- 
room the work consists in lecture demonstrations and recitations 
from a text-book. In the laboratory a course of experiments, 
parallel to the work in the class-room, is performed and reported 
under the supervision of an instructor. About 85 experiments 
are performed and reported in writing by each student during 
the year. The first term covers Mechanics and Heat; the second, 
Electricity, Sound, and Light. The course is intended to give a 
general knowledge of the subject and to prepare for more ad- 
vanced work. Each course 5 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for each of these courses. 



COLLEGE 

21. Mechanics, Molecular Physics and Heat. 

Prerequisites: Physics 7 and 8. The course consists in a series 
of precision measurements, the theory of each experiment being 
fully developed in the class-room. A knowledge of Trigonometry 
is required for this course. Two hours of lectures and two lab- 
oratory periods. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

22. Electricity, Sound and Light. 

This course is a continuation of Course 21. 4 credits. 

A laboratory fee is charged for this course. 

23. Problems in Physics. 

One hour per week is given to problem work in Physics. The 
course is designed to accompany Course 21. 1 credit. 

24. Problems in Physics. 

Similar to 23. 1 credit. 

PHYSIOGRAPHY 

See Geology. 






PHYSIOLOGY 

See Biology. 






AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 47 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

ACADEMY 

9. Civil Government. 

The first half of the course is devoted to the study of the 
Constitution of the United States, the second half to local and 
state government. 5 hours. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

See Philosophy. 

SURVEYING 
COLLEGE 
12. Surveying. 

An elementary course in land surveying; use of tape, compass, 
level, transit, and solar attachment. Recitations, field work, and 
drawing. Usually four hours of field work and drawing. 2 credits. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 11 and 12 or 13 and 14, and Draw- 
ing 15 and 16. 

SWEDISH 
ACADEMY 

5. First Year Swedish. 

Elements of Grammar, using Vikner's Swedish Grammar. 
Special study of nouns and verbs. Particular stress on principal 
parts of verbs, plural forms and genders of nouns and comparison 
of adjectives; composition. Reading of 250 pages of prose. 

4 hours. 

6. First Year Swedish. 

Study of grammar continued. Composition. Exercises in 
Orthography. Reading of 250 pages of prose. 4 hours. 

10. Second Year Swedish. 

Study of the Swedish sentence; its analysis and structure. 
Punctuation. Review of etymology. Exercises in Orthography. 
Themes. Reading of at least 500 pages of modern prose and 
poetry. 5 hours. 

COLLEGE 
11 and 12. Swedish Grammar. 

The same as courses 5, 6 and 10. These courses are intended 
especially for those who enter College without having studied 
Swedish. To those who have taken Swedish in the Academy 
they also furnish an opportunity to review the subject of Gram- 
mar. Each course 3 hours. 



48 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

13. SVENSK HlSTOEIA. 

Sverges historia fran aldsta tider till 1611. Sarskild vikt lag- 
ges pa studiet av de fyra standens uppkomst och utveckling, de 
inbordes striderna mellan svenska partiet och unionspartiet, 
seder och bruk i folkets dagliga liv samt Gustav Vasas regering, 

3 hours. 

14. SVENSK HlSTOEIA. 

Sverges historia fran 1611 till narvarande tid. Sarskild upp- 
marksamhet agnas at studiet av Sverges inre utveckling under 
1600 och 1700-talen samt av dess insats i varldshistorien under 
Gustav II Adolf och Karl XII. Mera grundligt studeras ocksa 
den politiska, sociala och ekonomiska utvecklingen under det 
senaste halvseklet. 3 hours. 

21. Sttlistik. 

Dispositionsovningar. Stillara med sarskild uppmarksamhet 
fast vid de olika stilarternas uppkomst och nuvarande anvand- 
ning. Studium av sprakriktighetsreglerna. 3 hours. 

22. Temaskrivning. 

Denna kurs, som ar baserad pa kursen i stilistik, omfattar 
skrivning av temata och uppsatser, ovningar i brevskrivning och 
i journalistisk stil samt skrivna oversattningar fran engelska 
till svenska med sarskild vikt lagd vid idiomatiska uttrycks 
korrekta atergivande. 3 hours. 

23. Svenska Littebattjeens Historia. 

Historisk framstallning av den svenska litteraturen fran folk- 
vandringstiden till 1809. Warburgs larobok i svensk litteratur- 
historia foljes, men huvudsakligen meddelas undervisningen ge- 
nom forelasningar. Prov pa de olika forfattarnas diktkonst 
studeras, rikligare ju narmare var egen tid. 4 hours. 

24. Svenska Litteraturens Historia. 

Fortsattning av foregaende kurs. Sarskilt studium agnas at 
Tegners lyriska dikter och Fritiofs saga, Atterboms Lycksalig- 
hetens 6, Runebergs episka dikter och Fdnrik Stals sagner samt 
at var egen tids forfattare: Viktor Rydberg, Strindberg, Froding, 
Selma Lagerlof, Heidenstam och Karlfelt. 4 hours. 

25 and 26. Noeska. 

Studium av norska spraket och litteraturen i huvudsakligt syfte 
att skickliggora den studerande att lasa och forsta norskt sprak 
samt gora honom i nagon man bekant med Norges litteratur. 
Arbeten av Ibsen och Bjornson samt, i den man tiden medgiver, 
av andra moderna forfattare genomgas. 
Will be given in 1918—19. 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 49 

21 and 28. Danska. 

Denna kurs ar av samma art soni den foregaende norska. I 
regel genomgas 1 a 2 av Holbergs komedier, ett drama av Oehlen- 
schlager samt arbeten av mera moderna forfattare. 

Will be given in 1919—20. 

ZOOLOGY 

See Biology. 

GRADUATION 



The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the Board of Direc- 
tors on persons who have satisfactorily completed all the prescribed 
work, as well as the required amount of elective work, in any of the 
ten groups of the College curriculum, in all 120 credits, to which must 
be added the required credits in gymnastics. A diploma fee of five 
dollars is charged. 



TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES 

The requirements of the Illinois Teachers' Certificating law for second 
grade certificates, first grade certificates, high school teachers' certifi- 
cates, special certificates, and supervisory certificates may be met by 
taking courses offered in Augustana College. The provisions of the 
law applying to students of this institution are as follows: 

I. County Cektificates. 

1. One year of work will be accepted as the equivalent of the junior 
year's work in a normal school in granting of a second grade county 
certificate, provided the credits in the following table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours. 

Education (Educational Psychology, History 

of Education, School Administration or 

Principles and Methods of Teaching) . . 6 semester hours. 

Electives 6 semester hours. 

Total 30 semester hours. 

2. Two years of work will be accepted as the equivalent of a normal 
school graduation in the granting of a first grade county certificate, 
provided the credits in the following table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics or Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

College Catalog. 4. 



50 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

History or Social Science 6 semester hours. 

Education (Educational Psychology, History 

of Education, School Administration or 

Principles and Methods of Teaching) . . 6 semester hours. 

Practise Teaching* 6 semester hours. 

Electives 30 semester hours. 

Total 60 semester hours. 

3. A high school teachers' certificate may be issued without exam- 
ination to a graduate of Augustana College provided the applicant offers 
within three years after graduation certified credits, accompanied by 
faculty recommendation of ability to teach in the high school and shows 
credit for at least three semester hours each of Educational Psychology 
and Principles and Methods of Teaching. 

4. Two years of work will admit a candidate to the examination for 
a county high school certificate, provided the credits have been certified 
by the president and registrar. 

5. Two years of work will admit the candidate to the examination 
for a county supervisory certificate, provided the credits in the follow- 
ing table have been earned. 

English 6 semester hours. 

Mathematics 6 semester hours. 

History of Education 3 semester hours. 

Natural Science 6 semester hours. 

Educational Psychology 3 semester hours. 

Principles and Methods of Teaching 3 semester hours. 

Electives 33 semester hours. 

Total 60 semester hours. 

The completion of 15 units of secondary work alone in a recognized 
high school or academy is the entrance requirement for each of the 
above outlined courses. 

II. State Certificates. 

a. Four-year Certificates. 

Graduates of Augustana College will be admitted to the State exam- 
ination as follows: 

1. For a four-year elementary school certificate, provided the appli- 
cant has had three years' successful teaching, two of which shall have 
been in the elementary schools of Illinois, on a first grade county 
certificate. 

2. For a four-year high school certificate, provided the applicant has 
had three years' successful teaching, two of which shall have been in 



* The College will endeavor to provide opportunity for practise teaching, but does not 
guarantee such opportunity to every student. 



AUGUSTAN A COLLEGE 51 

Illinois, on a first grade, high school or supervisory county certificate. 

3. For a four-year supervisory certificate, provided the applicant has 
had three years' successful teaching, two of which shall have been in 
Illinois, on a county supervisory certificate. 

b. Life Certificates. 

At the time of its expiration any four-year State certificate shall, 
upon evidence of successful teaching or supervision satisfactory to the 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, become valid and endorsed for 
life. 



POSTGRADUATE COURSES 



The offering of graduate courses is henceforth optional with the heads 
of the respective college departments. 

Courses of study leading to the degree of Master of Arts are subject 
to the following conditions: 

1. Only persons who have received a Bachelor's degree from this 
institution or one of equal rank, and who sustain a good moral charac- 
ter, are eligible candidates. 

2. In average cases it is expected that two years' time will be re- 
quired to complete the course. 

3. Resident study at or within easy reach of the institution is, as a 
rule, insisted upon. 

4. Professional studies are not accepted for the Master's degree. 

5. The subjects pursued shall be a major and a minor, together with 
a thesis on some subject in connection with the major study. The 
amount of work required in the major and minor shall be equivalent to 
one year of ordinary academic work, the work on the thesis being addi- 
tional to this. The estimated proportion is: the major 20 points, the 
minor 10 points, the thesis 15 points. The courses are under the 
immediate direction of a committee of the faculty, consisting of the 
professors in charge of the departments to which the subjects chosen 
belong. 

6. The candidate is required to present himself at the College, for 
final examination, at least one week before Commencement. The exam- 
ination may be taken in instalments at the discretion of the professor 
in charge of the department. 

7. The candidate must submit his thesis to the faculty by the first 
of May prior to his graduation, the theme having been reported to the 
faculty for approval at least six months before the presentation of the 
thesis. This thesis, which is to disclose as much original research as 
possible, may be publicly read and defended by the author at a time 
and place appointed for that purpose. It shall be carefully examined 
by each professor under whom the candidate shall have pursued his 
studies, and upon recommendation of this committee shall be accepted 



52 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

or rejected by the faculty. At least two bound copies of the thesis, 
which must be typewritten or printed, shall be deposited in the College 
Library. 

8. Applicants are limited in their choice of subjects to those branches 
of study for which instruction is provided in the several established 
Collegiate departments. 

9. A fee of sixty dollars is charged, of which fifty dollars must be 
paid at the time of registration, and ten dollars at the time of grad- 
uation. 

10. Each candidate shall report progress to the Secretary of the 
faculty not later than the first of February of each year. 

For further information, apply to the Enrolling Officer or to the 
heads of the departments concerned. 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



Students entering a class at any time subsequent to the first hour of 
a term in that subject will be reported absent by the instructor, and 
must account for all the hours lost by such delay in entering. While 
new students may be received at any time, they will find it very much 
to their interest to be on hand on Registration day, as work in all 
classes begins promptly the first day of the term. 

. All students are required to attend divine service at least once every 
Sunday; and also the daily Chapel exercises, unless excused by the 
President. 

Certificates of standing are given at the end of each term. 

The standing of students in each subject is marked on a scale of 100, 
the minimum limit for passing in each subject being 60, and the aver- 
age 80. 

Mid-term reports concerning the progress in study of the younger 
students are sent to their parents or guardians. Also in the case of 
older students on request, or when the faculty deems such reports 
desirable. 

Any student whose standing and progress in any subject are not 
satisfactory to the teacher may be dropped at any time during the term. 

Attendance upon instruction in the undergraduate courses is re- 
quired. Deviations from this rule are allowed only under exceptional 
circumstances. Should any student wish to earn credits by private 
work and examination, he must submit a petition to this effect to the 
faculty thru the enrolling officer. The faculty will not, however, grant 
any such petition unless it be accompanied by the recommendation of 
the professor in charge of the department concerned, and unless the 
petitioner has earned an average standing of at least 85 for the term 






ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 53 

last preceding. The minimum grade for approval in the examination 
is also 85 per cent. 

Professional men who have not completed the College course but 
desire to do so by non-resident study are generally accorded this priv- 
ilege, but at least one year of resident study is required for the degree 
of A. B. 

Resident study on the part of seniors thruout the year is, as a rule, 
required. 



54 THEOLOGICAL SEMINAKY 



The Theological Seminary 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D.D., R.N.O., 

Professor Emeritus. 

Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D.D., LL.D., R.N.O., 

Professor of Systematic Theology, Apologetics and Church Polity. 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, and Evangelistics. 

Rev. SVEN GUSTAP YOUNGERT, Ph.D., D.D., 

Professor of Philosophy, Theological Propedeutics, Biblical Introduction, Catechetics 

and Liturgies. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A.M., 

Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Homiletics. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Professor of Church History, Symbolics, Biblical Theology, Pastoral Theology, and 

Hymnology. 



ADMISSION AND MATRICULATION 



The Theological Seminary prepares students for the ministry of the 
Evangelical Lutheran Church, with the special needs of the Augustana 
Synod in view. The efficient service of the Church requires that its 
pastors be men of Christian experience and character, confessional 
fidelity, large vision, and disinterested motives, with a sincere con= 
cern for the cause of Christ and the welfare of souls, and with the 
readiness of a true witness to make sacrifices for the furtherance of 
the Kingdom. The call of the Lord and His Church is for able preach- 
ers of the Law and the Gospel, devoted pastors, efficient leaders, 
qualified teachers, educated theologians, and consecrated missionaries. 
To this end all the courses of the Seminary are directed. A spirit of 
loyalty and solidarity, knowledge of important detail, interest in the 
work and faith in the mission of the Synod are further qualifications 
with which the Seminary aims to equip and imbue its candidates for 
the gospel ministry of its own Church. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 55 

A full classical course is regarded as constituting a normal prepara- 
tion for the Seminary. The rule, therefore, is that all candidates for 
admission as regular students in the Seminary must be graduates of 
a recognized College, the courses of which must have included: English, 
Swedish, German, Latin and Greek according to the following require- 
ments : 

1. Swedish: For candidates who intend to serve congregation using 
the Swedish language all required courses in Academy and College 
according to Classical Course B. Candidates for English work are 
excused from College Swedish. 

2. English: a) For candidates who intend to serve Swedish congre- 
gations all required courses in Academy and College according to Clas- 
sical Course B, or an equivalent. 

b) For candidates in exclusively English work all required courses 
in Academy and College according to Classical Course A. 

3. German: Two years German as a minimum. 

4. Latin: Two years Latin as a minimum. 

5. Greek: Two years Greek as a minimum. 

All applications for admission to the Seminary should be presented 
before the first day of September, or if possible by the first of June, 
of the school year; all such applications to be sent to the President 
or to the Secretary of the Faculty, Prof. C. J. Sodergren, 1010—38 St., 
Rock Island, 111. 

Each applicant who is a graduate of any of the colleges of the Synod 
will present to the Matriculation Committee, consisting of the Theolo- 
gical Faculty, the President, Vice-President and Secretary of the Synod, 
the following documents. 

1. A formal application for admission to the Seminary. 

2. A brief biography, a full account of his Christian experience, and 
explicit statement of the motives which induce him to devote his life 
to the ministry of the gospel. 

3. A certificate of graduation. 

4. A statement of all the College credits. 

5. Satisfactory testimonials from the authorities of the institution 
previously attended as to the candidate's Christian character and prac- 
tical ability, and 

6. Certificate of membership in a Lutheran church, together with 
recommendations from the pastor of the applicant. 

Students from other colleges must furnish statements of equivalent 
value of character. 

The committee on matriculation will hold a colloquium with the new 
applicant during the first week of the scholastic year, in the third 
week in September. If the students arrive later, they cannot be matric- 
ulated before the beginning of the following scholastic year. 

Each course of study extends thru one full year or more. 



56 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

COURSES 

The whole plan of instruction is divided into twenty distinct courses 
as specified in the catalog. The classes have from one to three lectures 
and recitations a week in each course. The courses cover all the im- 
portant subjects taught in the best theological seminaries of our Church. 
The student must pass oral or written examinations in these twenty- 
courses to become a graduate of the Seminary. 

Altho several of the courses are elective as to order, the students 
are recommended to study according to the following plan: Junior 
year: I, Ha, III, IV, V, VI, Xa; Middle year: lib, Vila, Villa, IX, Xb, 
Xlla, XIII, XVIa, XVII, XX; Senior yenr: VHIb, Xc, XI, Xllb, XIV, 
XV, XVIb, XVIII, XIX. 

No student is allowed to enter the Senior class unless he has passed 
satisfactory examinations in the preceding courses. 

The peculiar plan of this Institution forbids the admission ad eundem 
gradum of students who have taken part of a course at other semina- 
ries or universities. But a student, in addition to the courses which he 
has selected, may offer for examination whatever subject he has previ- 
ously mastered. No one, however, can be granted the B. D. degree 
unless he has been a regular resident student for the number of years 
the regulations and courses require. As a rule, all students should 
take a full three years' course at this seminary. 

The degree of Bachelor of Divinity, B. D., is the standard of gradu- 
ation from our Seminary and this degree is granted to all regular 
students who are Bachelor of Arts, and who with decided credit have 
completed all the courses of the Seminary, presented the thesis as 
required, 1 ) and been duly approved by the professors in charge of the 
subject and by the Faculty. 

Graduates with the S. M. degree may later receive E. D. degree if 
by examinations in all subjects required, they raise their testimonials 
according to preceding conditions and write the thesis. 

In order to give time for review no final examinations are held with 
the Junior and Middle classes before May 15. 

INTRODUCTORY COURSES 
I. THEOLOGICAL PROPEDEUTICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR YOUXGERT. 

This course gives a general survey of all the theological sciences. 
Weidner's Theological Encyclopedia is used as text book. Philip Schaff' s 
Theological Propedeutic is constantly referred to. 



*) Candidates for the B. D. degree should select their subjects for the thesis and have 
them approved by the Faculty during the Spring term of the Middle year, and be ready to 
submit the thesis not later than February 1st of the Senior year. The subject may be 
chosen from the Exegetical, the Historical, the Systematic, or the Philosophical departments. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 57 

II. PHILOSOPHY 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR YOUjSTGERT. 

This course embraces Introduction to Philosophy, History of Philo- 
sophy, History and Philosophy of Religion. The instruction is given 
by lectures based upon outlines and textbooks as well as by assignments 
and seminar work. In the Junior year Introduction to Philosophy is 
offered during the Fall term and History of Philosophy during the 
Spring term; the History and Philosophy of Religion is presented in 
the Middle year. 

Text-books and Books of Reference: Hibben's Introduction to Phi- 
losophy; Montgomery's Religions of the Past and Present; Ladd's Phi- 
losophy of Religion; Schwegler's History of Philosophy, and Pontus 
Wikner's Filosofiens historia, utgifven af S. G. Youngert. 

III. INTRODUCTION TO SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This subject is offered during the Junior year and embraces intro- 
duction to Dogmatics, Ethics, and Apologetics. Instruction is given 
by recitations and lectures. Students are required either to present 
written answers to questions in the text-book or a typewritten essay 
on some of the more important topics. 

Text-Book: Weidner's Introduction to Dogmatic Theology. 

Books of Reference: Introductions in standard works of Systematic 
Theology. 

IV. ELEMENTARY HEBREW 3 hours. 

The work in Hebrew during the Junior year covers fifty lessons in 
Harper's Method and Manual and Elements of the Hebrew Grammar. 
Additional chapters in Genesis are translated. A working vocabulary 
is memorized. A written examination is required on the Hebrew para- 
digms and some selected passage for translation. 

The text-books used are Harper's Hebrew Method and Manual, Harp- 
er's Elements of Hebrew, Kittel's Hebrew Bible, and some standard 
Hebrew Dictionary. 

In addition a collateral course is given in English Bible, Old Testa- 
ment. 1 hour. 
V. GREEK JUNIOR. 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN" 

The regular studies of this department embrace the reading and 
explication of one of the Gospels and the Acts. In order to familiarize 
the student with the vocabulary and construction of the language, verses 
from the parts assigned are repeated from memory at each recitation. 
A written examination on the ground covered is required. The N. T. 
Syntax is reviewed in lectures and notes. 

The text of Nestle (or Westcott-Hort) is used. 

In addition a collateral course is given in English Bible, New Testa- 
ment. 1 hour. 



58 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

VI. BIBLICAL IXTRODUTIOX. 3 hours. 

PROFESSOR YOUNGEST. 

a. General Introduction and Hermeneutics, embracing the original 
languages and the Canon of the Old and New Testaments, b. Special 
Introduction, dealing with the authorship, integrity, design and struc- 
ture of the several books, together with the historical criticism of the 
same. c. History of Israel and Contemporary History of the Old and 
New Testaments, d. Textual Criticism, e. Biblical Hermeneutics. 

These sciences are offered by means of lectures, text-books and se- 
minar work. Text-books to be used 1918 — 1919: J. G. Lansing, Intro- 
duction to the Old Testament; AlcClymont, The New Testament and 
Its Writers; Hammond, Textual Criticism of the New Testament; Cel- 
lerier, Outlines of Biblical Hermeneutics in vol. I of Weidner's Theo- 
logical Encyclopedia; Gregory, Canon and Text of the New Testament; 
Angus Green, The Cyclopedic Handbook of the Bible. 

VII. ADVANCED HEBREW 4 hours. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREX 

a, Middle Year. 

Several historical books are read during the year, besides some psalms 
and some of the minor prophets. The word lists are reviewed as well 
as the main parts of the Hebrew grammar. A final examination is re- 
quired on the word lists and on translation of some assigned Hebrew 
text. 

b. Senior Year. 

The Senior year is not a language course, but a course in Old Testa- 
ment Exegesis, when one of the major prophets or Deuteronomy is 
studied exegetically. All the principles of Hermeneutics are applied 
to the Hebrew text, and all the doctrinal and critical points involved 
are carefully and thoroly discussed. 

A written examination is required at the end of the course. During 
1917 — 1918 Isaiah has been studied. 

VIII. GREEK MIDDLE AND SENIOR, AND NEW TESTAMENT 

EXEGESIS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODEEGREX 

This division embraces the reading and explication of the larger part 
of the New Testament from Romans to Revelation, with a thoro exe- 
gesis of one or more of the principal books. Each student reports on 
special assignments. In the Middle Year the practise of memorizing 
verses in the Greek is continued. In the Senior Year the recitations 
are largely in the nature of seminars, or round-tables. The students 
are encouraged to make a careful study of the best Commentaries 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 59 

Written examinations are required, and exegetical notes on some por- 
tion of this part of the New Testament may be presented in proof of 
scholarship. 

HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 
IX. BIBLICAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

This course has this year been a Seminar on salient Biblical Theolo- 
gical themes as: Essence of Christianity, Law and Gospel, Repentance, 
and the like, with strong emphasis on the historical development in 
each case. 

X. CHURCH HISTORY 5 hours. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

The entire Church History is offered during the three years, W. 
Walker, "A History of the Christian Church" (N. Y., 1918) this year 
to be the chief text-book, with assigned sections of Kurtz's "Church 
History as supplementary (or corrective). 1918 — 1919 special emphasis 
will be laid on Apostolic Christianity (historically viewed), the Ref- 
ormation, Schleiermacher and the Nineteenth Century. Designated 
source reading will during the year be part of the course. 

In the Senior year a briefer general survey of 19 — 20 Century is first 
taken with attendant examination, and then the remainder of the year 
is a full Church History Seminar on selected movements and per- 
sonalities of the period, culminating in the contemporary situation of 
the Church. Each member of class reads at a Seminar. Notes on 
Seminar papers and on discussions required and to be submitted. 

Students pass examinations on texts, source readings and lectures. 

Encouragement and aid in the method and principles of historical 
inquiry applied to Sacred and Church History given all through the 
course. 

During the coming year a definite amount of Source Reading will be 
assigned for each of the three years, examinations to cover this Source 
Reading. 

XI. SYMBOLICS AND CONFESSIONS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR HULT 

A careful study of the text-books is required. A course of lectures 
is also given by the professor on the Confession of the Reformed 
Churches and Sects in America. Examinations must be offered. 

Text-Books :Bensow's Larobok i Symbolik; Concordia Pia (The Edi- 
tion of the Augustana Synod) ; Forsander's Den Oforandrade Augsbur- 
giska bekannelsen. 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 
XII. DOGMATICS AND HISTORY OF DOGMAS 4 hours. 

PROFESSOR LIXDBERG 

This course is offered during the Middle and Senior years, but the 
beginning of the course is introduced during the Junior year. 



60 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Course A: Recitations and lectures cover Theology, Anthropology 
and Christology and also the corresponding course in the History of 
Dogmas. 

Course B: Necessary repetitions. Recitations and lectures cover 
Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ecclesiology and Eschatology and also the 
corresponding course in the History of Dogmas. 

Text-Books: Lindberg's Dogmatik and Dogmhistoria: Schmid's Doc- 
trinal Theology, or Jacob's A Summary of the Christian Faith. 

Books of Reference: Phillippi's Glaubenslehre; Hagenbach's History 
of Dogmas, Seeberg's History of Doctrines; Fisher's History of Doc- 
trine; Krauth's Conservative Reformation. 

XIII. ETHICS AND SOCIOLOGY 2 hours. 

PEOFESSOE LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Middle year and covers Theoretical 
and Practical Ethics and Christian Sociology. Theoretical Ethics is 
studied by recitations and lectures, and Practical Ethics, including 
Christian Sociology, by lectures based on dictated outline. 

Text-Books: Martensen's Christian Ethics; A dictated Outline in Prac- 
tical Ethics and Christian Sociology. 

Books of Reference and Collateral Reading: Luthardt: "History of 
Christian Ethics," "Kompendium der Teologischen Etik;" Dorner: 
"System of Christian Ethics;" Granfelt: "Den Kristliga Sedelaran;" 
Keyser: "A System of Christian Ethics;" Paulsen: "A System of 
Ethics;" Hayes: "Introduction to the Study of Sociology." 

XIV. APOLOGETICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOE LINDBEBG 

This course or discipline aims at presenting as complete a system of 
Christian Apologetics as possible. The course is offered during the 
Senior year and given principally by lectures and partly by recitations, 
based on the text in the text-book which, altho rendered in a concise 
form, covers as fully as necessary besides Introduction: Theological, 
Anthropological, Soteriological, Pneumatological and Eschatological 
Apologetics. The students are required to write a Thesis on a subject 
approved by the professor. 

Text-Book: Lindberg's Apologetics, A System of Christian Evidence. 
For books of reference and collateral reading see Bibliography in the 
Text-Book. 

PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 
XV. CATECHETICS, DIACONICS AND EVANGELISTICS 

1. CATECHETICS AND SUNDAY SCHOOL WORK. 2 DOUrS. 

PROFESSOE YOUNGEST 

This course is devoted to the science of Christian instruction of the 
young for their exercise of practical membership in the church. Much 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 61 

stress is laid on the application of the theory of Catechetics and on 
instruction in the Sunday-school. 

Text-Books: Scheele's Kateketik, Gerberding's Catechetics; Hunt's 
Sunday School Hand Book and Farris' The Sunday School at Work. 

2. Diaconics and Missions. 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

Text-Books: Pfeiffer, Mission Studies; Wolf, Missionary Heroes of the 
Lutheran Church; Ohl, The Inner Mission; Speakers' Handbook of the 
Board of English Home Missions. 

Topics are assigned and papers are prepared by the students and 
read and discussed in the class thruout the school year. 

XVI. HOMILETICS 2 hours. 

PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

In the Middle Year Fry's text-book on Homiletics is used as an out- 
line, with lectures on the fundamental principles of preaching. The 
members of the class are drilled in practical exercises in preaching 
and public reading of the Scriptures in the English language. The 
Senior Year is devoted mainly to class preaching and practical exer- 
cises in the Swedish language, with reports on special assignments in 
the History of Homiletics. 

XVII. LITURGICS 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR YOUNGERT 

Liturgies is studied during the Middle year. Instruction is given by 
recitations and lectures. The students are also trained in correct read- 
ing of the liturgy. A professor in the Conservatory instructs in the 
rendering of the musical parts or chanting. 

Text-Book: Ullman's Liturgik. 

XVIII. CHURCH POLITY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

This course is offered during the Senior year. The course is both 
theoretical and practical, including also instruction in correct keeping 
of Church Records. Written answers to questions based on text-books 
and lectures are required. 

Text-Book: Holmstrom's Kyrkorattslara och Lindberg's Syllabus i 
Kyrkorattslara. 

XIX. PASTORAL THEOLOGY 1 hour. 

PROFESSOR HTJLT 

Pastoral Theology is studied by Norrby's "Laran om Sjalavarden" 
with close attention to both principles and practice, and with the needs 



62 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



of our Lutheran Church in America in full view. Examinations on text- 
book and lectures. 

XX. CHURCH MUSIC, HYMNOLOGY AND LITURGICAL RENDI- 
TION. 1 hour. 

PBOFESSOB HULT. 

The course of lectures given in the Fall Term aims to give an intel- 
ligent grasp of hymning and church music as factors of church wor- 
ship, and on methods of obtaining the best results. In the Spring 
Term practical exercises are held in Liturgical Renditions. Notes on 
lectures basis of examination. 



In addition to the above courses theoretical and practical instruction 
in Voice Training is given by the Professor in Voice. Also in Public 
Speaking by the Teacher of Elocution. These additional courses are 
required, and due credit is given. 

POSTGRADUATE COURSES 

For those who wish to continue their theological studies the follow- 
ing courses leading to the degree of candidatus sacrce theologies, C. S. T., 
have been arranged. 



I. INTRODUCTORY SCIENCES. 

PROFESSOR YOUNGERT 

No. 1. Theological Encyclopedia. 
Minor 1. Study of the inner organization of the Theological Sciences, 
classification of the respective departments with the special 
principles and methods applying to these disciplines together 
with selection of literature. 

No. 2. Introduction to the Study of Religion. 
Minor 1. The History of Religion: 

a. Origin, universality, development and differentiation of 
Religion. 

b. Historical development of the various forms of Religion 
or General History of Religions. 

Minor 2. Comparative Religion: 

a. A general survey of the entire field. 

b. A comparison between related or contiguous religions 
such as those of Babylonia and the early Hebrew people, 
the Romans and the Teutons, Israel and Christianity. 

Minor 3. Psychology of Religion: 

a. Analysis of Religious Experience. 

b. Biblical Psychology. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 63 

Minor 4. Philosophy of Religion. 

a. Origin and Nature of Religion. 

b. Religion in its subjective and objective relations. 

c. The Philosophy of Theism. 
Minor 4. History of Philosophy. 

No. 3. Introduction to the Study of the Bible. 

A. The Old Testament. 

Major 1. History of Israel and of the Jews from earliest time to 135 

A. D. 
Major 2. An historical survey of the ancient history of Western Asia 

with special references to the extra-Biblical sources for 

Hebrew and Jewish History. 
Major 3. Introduction to the Old Testament, its Canon, Interpretation, 

Criticism and Versions. 
Minor 1. The Apochrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the Old Testament. 
Minor 2. Semitic Art and Archeology in their bearing upon the study 

of the Bible. 

B. The New Testament. 
Major 1. Canon, Text and Versions. 

Major 2. Historical Introduction to the books of the New Testament. 
Minor 1. History of the New Testament Times. 
Minor 2. New Testament Interpretation, its principles and helps. 



II. OLD TESTAMENT EXEGESIS 

PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

A. Majors. 

1. Deuteronomy: Critical translation and a study of the Pentateuchal 
problems. 

2. Job: Critical translation and a study of the problem of suffering. 

3. The Psalter: Critical translation of the main Psalms, and a study 
of Hebrew poetry. 

4. Isaiah: Critical translation and interpretation of the main prophe- 
cies, with special emphasis laid on the doctrines of Isaiah. 

5. Jeremiah: Critical translation and interpretation of the main 
prophecies and a special study of the political and religious life 
of Israel during his time. 

6. Ezekiel: Critical translation of the main prophecies and a special 
study of the conditions of the Exile. 

7. Daniel: Critical translation and interpretation of the Book, with 
a special study of its problems. 

8. The Earlier Minor Prophets: Critical translation with an exe- 
getical study of their teachings. 

9. The Later Minor Prophets: Critical translation with a study of 
the historical setting and contents of these prophecies. 



64 



THEOLOGICAL SEMIXABY 



. Minors. 

1. The sacrifices and sacrificial rites of the Mosaic legislation. 

2. The theocratic ideal form of government of the Old Testament. 

3. The Old Testament problem of suffering. 

4. The Old Testament conceptions of redemption. 

5. The Old Testament law of divine retribution. 

6. The Messianic types and prophecies of the Old Testament. 

7. The Theophanies and Apocalyptic visions of the Old Testament. 

8. Special elementary courses in Assyrian, Arabic, Syriac and Bib- 
lical Aramaic. 

9. The Old Testament religion. 



III. NEW TESTAMENT EXEGESIS 

PEOFESSOE SODERGREX 

Major 1. Critical and Exegetical study of any part of the New Testa- 
ment, by agreement. 

Major 2. Peculiarities of the New Testament Greek. 

Major 3. The later discoveries of Papyrus Manuscripts and Fragments 
in their bearing on New Testament Exegesis. 

Minor 1. The exegesis of the Logos passages. 

Minor 2. "Righteousness" in the New Testament. 

Minor 3. "Reconciliation" in the New Testament. 

Minor 4. The historical framework of the Acts. 

Minor 5. The "discrepancies" of the New Testament. 

Minor 6. The element of Inspiration in the New Testament quotations 
from the Old Testament. 

Minor 7. The need of a new English Version. 

Minor 8. A critical study of the latest Swedish Version. 

Minor 9. The Uses of the Aorist, the Participle, or the Modes. 

Minor 10. Patristic Greek, as exemplified by one of the early Church 
Fathers. 



IV. HISTORICAL THEOLOGY 

PEOFESSOE HELT 

No. 1. Chuech Histoey 

Major 1. History of the Christian Church from its foundation to the 
Middle Ages. 

Major 2. History of the Christian Church during the Middle Ages and 
the Reformation. 

Major 3. History of the Christian Church from the seventeenth cen- 
tury to the present time. 

Major 4. The History of the Church in the United States. 

Minor 1. The Apostolic Age. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



65 



Patristics or a more detailed study of some Church Father. 

The Apostolic Letters and Apostolic Fathers compared. 

The Reformation Period. 

Athanasius, or Augustine, with study of their chief writings. 

The Sacramental discussions of Luther, Zwingli and Calvin. 

History of the Scandinavian Churches. 

Olavus Petri's writings. 

History of the Church in the Nineteenth Century. 

No. 2. Symbolics and Confessions 
Major. Symbolics and Confessions in general and their importance. 
Minor 1. History and analysis of the Lutheran Confessions. 
Minor 2. History and analysis of the Reformed Churches. 

V. SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR lindberg 

No. 1. Dogmatics and History of Dogmas 

Major 1. Study of three complete Lutheran systems. Selections may 
be made from systems written in Latin, English, German or 
Swedish. 

Major 2. Study of three complete non-Lutheran works. Selections may 
be made from systems written in English or German. If 
desirable one Lutheran work may be substituted for a non- 
Lutheran work. 

Major 3. Research work in one department of dogmatics, the selection 
to be made from one of the seven main divisions: Theology, 
Anthropology, Christology, Soteriology, Pneumatology, Ec- 
clesiology, and Eschatology. Or instead of one main division 
a special topic in any division may be chosen, scholarly re- 
search work to be proved by a treatise or thesis on the sub- 
ject selected. 

Minor 1. Study of a complete course of History of Dogmas, covering 
all the periods and leading doctrines. In the selection of 
works language will be optional. 

Minor 2. Research work in one of the main periods, covering the 
development of the leading doctrines in such a period. Or 
the student may select one leading doctrine and follow its 
development through all the periods. 

No. 2. Ethics and Sociology 

Major 1. Study of the History of Ethics, two systems of Christian 
Ethics, and as a comparative course one system of Moral 
Philosophy. 

Major 2. Study of Social Ethics, Christian Sociology and as a com- 
parative study History of Socialism and Socialism as a, 
Science. 



College Catalog. 5. 



66 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Major 3. Special research work in the field of Social Ethics and So- 
ciology, the result to be presented in a treatise or thesis. 

Minor 1. A thoro study of one ethical system and the special develop- 
ment of some division to prove special research work. 

Minor 2. Special study and research work in some field of Sociology 
such as History of Sociology, Social Service, Social Control, 
Economics, Social Pathology, Socialism, etc., or the treat- 
ment of some practical work in social service. 

No. 3. Apologetics and Polemics 

Major 1. History of Apologetics and study of at least one of the 
larger works so as to cover all the main questions in the 
apologetical science. 

Major 2. A detailed study of some main division or subject, the result 
of such study to be proved by a treatise or thesis. 
Assistance will be given in selection of suitable subjects. 

Minor 1. The study of the Evidence of Christian experience as pre- 
sented by some of the leading authors with a written syn- 
opsis on some leading work. 

Minor 2. The study of the science of Polemics in general, its history 
and methods, or special heresies in churches and religious 
societies may be selected and arguments presented against 
errors and misapprehension of principal doctrines. In this 
course the relation of Polemics and Irenics may be studied, 
the vindication of the true unity and the disparagement of 
unionism in theory and practise. 



Minor 1. 
Minor 2. 



Minor 3. 



Minor 1. 



Minor 2. 



VI. PRACTICAL THEOLOGY 

PROFESSOR YOTJNGERT 

No. 1. Catechetics and Christian Education 
The History of Religious Education. 

Religious Child Study; Formation of Christian Character; 
The Family, the Church and the State in their respective 
relation to religious education. 

Methods and Means: The Catechism, the Biblical History 
and the Church Book with Criticism of literature belonging 
to this department. 

NO. 2. LlTURGICS AND CHRISTIAN ART 

Study of specially recommended general works in Liturgies 
and Christian Art, covering all the main topics. 
Special research work in the greater subjects of Liturgies 
and Christian Art, such as the Ancient Liturgies, the Church 
Year, the Main Elements in Worship, Hymnology and Church 
Music and Christian Architecture. 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINAEY 



67 



Minor 3. Special and constructive study of some leading subject in 
Liturgies, such subject to be treated as fully as possible with 
the results presented in written form. 

Minor 4. Special treatment of one main topic in Christian Art with 
the results offered in written form. 

NO. 3. HOMLLETICS 
PROFESSOR SODERGREN 

Minor 1. History and Fundamental Principles of Homiletics. 

Minor 2. Studies in Biography. 

Minor 3. The Theory of Preaching. 

Minor 4. The Message of the Preacher. 

Minor 5. The Modern Pulpit. 

No. 4. Church Polity 

PROFESSOR LINDBERG 

Minor 1. The study of the science of Church Polity, covering its his- 
tory, theories and leading forms of church government. 

Minor 2. Special research work in certain fields, such as the Roman 
Catholic, Lutheran and Reformed, or the leading church 
polities in any of the denominations in the Reformed Church. 

Minor 3. Comparative study of leading ideas as expressed in the 
Episcopal, Territorial, Collegiate, Presbyterian and Congre- 
gational system. 

Minor 4. The church polity of the Lutheran Church in the United 
States and special treatment of some practical issues. 

No. 5. Pastoral Theology 

PROFESSOR HULT 

Minor 1. The minister's life and pastoral activity, pastoral calls and 

care of souls, synodical and parish problems. 
Minor 2. Historical Survey of the doctrine of the Office ("Amtslehre"). 

NO. 6. DlACONICS AND MISSIONS 
PROFESSOR BLOMGREN 

Minor 1. The History of Foreign Missions by Centuries, Centers and 

Agencies. 
Minor 2. The Present State and Present Problems of Foreign Missions. 
Minor 3. The Place of the United States and of our Lutheran Church 

in the Evangelization of the World. 
Minor 4. The United States as a Home Mission Field. 
Minor 5. The Inner Missions of the Lutheran Church. 
Minor 6. The Agencies of Mercy in our age. 
Minor 7. Ethnology. 

a. The Ayrian Ethnology as a basis for missionary work in 
India and Persia. 



68 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

b. The Mongolian Ethnology as a basis for missionary work 
in China and Japan. 

c. The Semitic Ethnology as a basis for missionary work 
in Semitic Lands. 

Minor 8. The Sacred Books of the East. 



REGULATIONS AND DEGREES 



A postgraduate student who has completed eight of the courses, five 
majors and three minors, receives the degree of Candidatus Sacrce 
Theologice. 

The requirements for the C. S. T. degree are "five majors and three 
minors, — one major from each of the five main departments, viz., Bib- 
lical Introduction, Old Testament Exegesis, New Testament Exegesis, 
the Historical, and the Systematic departments; one minor from the 
Practical group, and two additional minors from any two of the five 
main departments." 

Xo one, however, may register for this degree unless he has passed 
the examinations and completed the requirements for the B. D. degree 
according to the curriculum of the Seminary and has previously ac- 
quired the A. B. degree from a recognized college. If a student is a 
graduate of some other Seminary he must prove by testimonials that 
his theological studies correspond to our course for the B. D. degree 
or comply with its requirements, and he must be an A. B. from a 
recognized college. Non-resident students qualifying for the B. D. 
degree are required, besides the matriculation and diploma fees, to 
pay a fee of five (5) dollars to the professor in the department of the 
topic selected for the supervision of the work and the examination of 
the thesis, and one (1) dollar to each of the five professors for the 
examination of reports on assignments or other written or oral ex- 
amination. 

At least one course should be completed each year; but under all 
circumstances a student must report progress before April 1st of each 
year, otherwise the name of the student will be dropped from the 
catalog without previous notice. These studies may be carried on by 
correspondence, but in his own interest the student is urged to make, as 
far as feasible, the major part of his work resident study. Candidates 
may present themselves for the required oral and written examinations 
at any time during the school year. By special arrangement other 
examinations may take the form of a written treatise. 

The fee for the C. S. T. degree is $75, divided as follows: five (5) 
dollars registration fee to the treasurer of the Institution when matricu- 
lated; five (5) dollars for the diploma when the degree is conferred; 



THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 69 

ten (10) dollars for each major and five (5) dollars for each minor at 
the beginning of the course to the professor of the subject. 

The degree of Sacrce Theologiw Doctor is conferred upon a Candi- 
datus Sacrae Theologiae who presents an acceptable thesis indicating 
original and fairly exhaustive research work along the chosen line of 
study and giving evidence of being an actual contribution to the sum 
of theological science. The theme and the thesis must be approved by 
the Theological Faculty. The thesis must cover at least 75 printed 
or 100 typewritten pages, and be submitted in at least two copies. For 
the examination of the thesis by the several members of the Faculty a 
fee of twenty (20) dollars is required, and a charge of five (5) dollars 
is made by the Institution for the diploma when the degree is conferred. 
A candidate for the S. T. D. must have been in the ministry not less 
than seven years. 

The above degrees are granted by the Board of Directors on the 
recommendation of the Theological Faculty and conferred at the Com- 
mencement Exercises of the Seminary. 

Further information will be furnished by the individual professors 
on application to the Corresponding Secretary. Address: Dr. C. A. 
Blomgren, 825— 35th St., Rock Island, 111. 



70 THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



The Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art 



THE CONSERVATORY YEAR 

The school year in the Conservatory consists of thirty-six weeks 
divided into four terms as follows: two Fall terms of eight weeks each, 
and two Spring terms of ten weeks each. 

CALENDAR 
1918 
Fall semester, first term, begins 9 a. m., Monday, Sept. 2. 
Fall semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Oct. 26. 
Fall semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Oct. 28. 
Fall semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, Dec. 21. 

1919 
Spring semester, first term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, Jan. 6. 
Spring semester, first term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, March 15. 
Spring semester, second term, begins 8 a. m., Monday, March 17. 
Spring semester, second term, ends 6 p. m., Saturday, May 24. 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

JOHN VICTOR BERGQUIST, A.A.G.O., 

Director, 

Professor of Piano, Organ, Harmony, Director of Handel Oratorio Society, Wennerberg 

Chorus (male voices). 

Rev. E. F. BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., LL.D., 

Lecturer on Psychology in its Relation to Music. 

OLOF GRAFSTR6M, 

Professor of Painting and Designing. 

ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music and Director of Orchestra. 

ARVID SAMUELSON, Mus. Bag., 

Professor of Piano, Advanced Piano Pedagogy, and Director of Oriole Club (ladies' voices). 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 71 

IVAR SOPHUS SKOUGAARD, 

Professor of Voice. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc. B., B.E., 

Professor of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

WILHELMINA CATHERINE WISTRAND, 

Instructor in Public School Music, Piano, and Harmony. 

ALTHEA BROWN, 

Instructor in Voice. 

ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Instructor in Piano. 

LEROY CARLSON, 

Assistant in Piano. 

VIRGILIUS THURE ANSELM FERM, 

Director of Band. 

FREDA ELIZABETH MATTSON, 

Student Assistant in Piano. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



In these days when almost every scheme of education must include 
a course of music, the question where such a course can best be ob- 
tained, is one of vital importance. The multiplicity of musical colleges 
and conservatories, to say nothing of private teachers, makes the solu- 
tion of the above problem none the easier. It is the purpose of this 
catalog to show some of the advantages possessed by the Augustana 
Conservatory of Music. 

Music as an important factor in a broader education, as an indis- 
pensable factor in cultural development, is gradually gaining ground. 
All the larger colleges and universities are placing the same in their 
curricula. Every individual who claims to be intelligent should feel 
the need of a better understanding and appreciation of music, the 
language of emotions. 

We are living in a practical age, and much of the education in our 
day tends to develop the practical man; but man's needs are not only 
practical, they are also esthetic and sympathetic. We need in this 
country not only a full head and full pocket book, but a full heart as 
well; but the study of music is not the development of the emotions 
only, pure emotionalism weakens character. A musical education 
should develop the intellectual man as well. One of our great educators 
has said: "Music is the best mind trainer on the list." A musician 
should be not only a reproducer of others' thoughts and ideas, but a 



72 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

broad intelligent thinker; not merely pianist, organist, violinist and 
singer, but musician. Then again, in order to be a broad musician, the 
student should know not only Bach, Beethoven, Brahms, Chopin, Liszt, 
etc., but Shakespeare, Holmes, Emerson, Longfellow, etc. A broad 
musical education means a broad intelligent grasp of the hopes, fears, 
and ambitions of man, analytically, comparatively, and historically. 

An institution offering the student an opportunity for such study, 
a conservatory giving the music student such privileges is unquestion- 
ably better equipped to give the student the best advantages. Another 
feature not to be lost sight of is the fact that the student is brought 
in contact with other students who are his equals or superiors. This 
is one of he strongest possible incentives to hard work, and if the 
pupil has any talent or ambition at all, this competition is sure to 
bring it out. And not only the contact with music students, but the 
interchange of ideas with students along other lines is a distinct 
advantage to the music student. 

COMBINED MUSIC AND LITERARY COURSES 
As the Augustana Conservatory is able to offer many advantages in 
literary and scientific study on account of its affiliation with a College 
and Academy of the first rank, attention is called to the importance of 
properly selected studies for students, be they particularly gifted in 
music or not. A student of music will find it very difficult to carry all 
his high school or college studies and progress satisfactorily in music 
at the same time. Therefore, as the pupil's general education must not 
be stopped nor his music study too much neglected, a course must be 
selected that will give him a good, general education and at the same 
time afford him opportunity to give careful attention to his work in 
music. A great many students take advantage each year of some com- 
bined music and literary course, some making more of a specialty of 
general subjects, others specializing in music. The director as well as 
the various teachers will gladly assist in selecting subjects most neces- 
sary and helpful to the student and in arranging the various courses. 
By taking a regular four years' course in music, which includes a num- 
ber of general subjects, the student will not only receive as much men- 
tal discipline and training as can be had from other courses during a 
similar period of time, but he will have the double advantage of being 
well equipped in music and having a good, practical knowledge of 
general subjects. 

COURSES AND CREDITS 
There is unquestionably a distinct advantage in placing the work 
done in a department of music on a strictly credit basis. The guess 
work on the part of teachers is corrected, the uncertainty in the prog- 
ress of the student is to a great extent eliminated. The students learn 
from time to time just how the teachers rate their work. This is an 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 73 

incentive to those who are ambitious and a lash to those who are care- 
less. To the student who is conscientious it is an encouragement. 

The usual method of designating courses in music is by grades. But, 
in order to facilitate matters in giving credits, a plan of courses similar 
to the one used in the college and academy has here been adopted. By 
the word "course" is meant the work outlined in a subject for a semes- 
ter. 1 Credits are based on the number of pratise and lesson hours per 
semester. One credit is allowed each semester for every three hours 
weekly practise, or, for two half hour lessons per week. 

The "courses" as indicated below for piano or violin require of the 
average student at least three hours daily practise (18 hours weekly) 
and two half hour lessons per week. Seven credits should therefore be 
allowed for one semester's work in either subject. However, owing to 
the unequal lengths of the semesters, seven credits are given in the fall 
and eight in the spring — fifteen credits for the year. 

Four and five credits are allowed each semester for the "courses" in 
organ and voice as these courses require only approximately twelve 
hours practise and two lessons per week. 

The work in theoretical and music-literary subjects is credited in the 
same manner as that in college or academy subjects. 

DIPLOMAS AND CERTIFICATES 

Diplomas are conferred upon students who have been in the conser- 
vatory at least one year and who have completed one of the regular four 
year courses for graduation or a postgraduate course, or, the two years' 
course in Public School Music together with a four year high school 
course or its equivalent. 

Teachers' certificates are issued to students who have completed the 
course up to and including the junior year in the regular four year 
courses or the two years' course in Public School Music minus a high 
school course. 

Students having completed the course in Methods (see Public School 
Music) will be granted a certificate. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Students taking a four year course and who wish to receive a grad- 
uates' diploma must have 160 credits apportioned as follows: 



1) It will be noted, however, in the description of the courses below that the work is 
outlined for the year rather than for the semester. This is done because of the difficulty 
of being absolutely specific in outlining work in as subtle and elastic a subject as music. 
But as marks of standing and credits are given at the end of each semester, it is necessary 
to divide the year's work into two parts and therefore convenient to designate each part 
as a "course." 



74 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



Maj. Subj. 


Theory, etc. 


Recital 


Piano 


English 


♦Electives 


Total 


Piano— 60 


25 


10 




25 


40 


160 


Organ— 27 


27 


10 


45 


25 


26 


160 


Violin— 60 


27 


10 


15 


25 


23 


160 


Voice— 27 


23 


10 


45 


25 


30 


160 



For a diploma in the Public School Music course 94 credits and a 
four year high school course, or equivalent, including 4 years English, 
are required. 

Credit will be given for work done elsewhere. 

Students must have some preliminary training in music before en- 
tering a regular four year course. No credits are allowed for this pre- 
paratory work. 

OUTLINE OF COURSES 

Graduates Diploma. 
Piano as major subject. 
First Year. 

Piano courses, 1-2 15 credits 

Theory courses, 1-2, 3-4 4 

English courses, 3-4* 9 " 

Second Year. 

Piano courses, 3-4 15 credits 

Theory courses, 5-6, 7-8 2 " 

English, 5-6* 8 

* (See outline of courses in Academy.) 

Third Year (Junior). 

Piano courses, 5-6 15 credits 

Sight Playing , 2 

Theory courses, 9-10 4 " 

History of Music course, 1-2 2 " 

English, 7-8 8 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Piano courses, 7-8 15 credits 

Psychology , 2 " 

History of Music, 3-4 2 credits 

Normal 2 

Theory 9-10-13 5 

Recital ., 10 

Electives during course 40 " 

*) The electives may be musical or literary, or both. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 75 

Organ as major subject. 
First Year. 

Before taking up the organ the pupil shall have finished the pre- 
paratory and first year in piano 27 credits 

Second Year. 

Organ, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 

Theory, 5-6 .2 

English, 5-6 8 " 

Third Year (Junior). 

Organ, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 15 

Theory, 7-8 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 8 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Organ, 5-6 9 credits 

Sight Playing 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 

Theory, 9-10-11-12-13 9 

Recital 10 

Electives during course 26 

Violin as major subject. 
First Year. 

Violin, 1-2 15 credits 

Theory, 1-2, 3-4 4 

English, 3-4 9 

Second Year. 

Violin, 3-4 ,15 credits 

Theory, 5-6 .2 

Piano 7 

English, 5-6 8 

Third Year (Junior). 

Violin, 5-6 15 credits 

Theory, 7-8 4 

Piano 8 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

Ensemble 2 

English, 7-8 8 

Recital (Optional) (5) 



76 conservatory of music 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Violin, 7-8 15 credits 

Psychology 2 

History of Music, 3-4 2 credits 

Ensemble 2 

Normal 2 

Theory 9-10-13 5 

Recital , 10 

Electives during course 23 

With Voice as major. 
First Year. 

Before entering this course in voice the student shall have finished 
the preparatory and first year in piano 27 credits 

Second Year. 

Voice, 1-2 9 credits 

Piano, 3-4 15 

Theory, 5-6 ,2 

English, 5-6 8 

Third Year (Junior). 

Voice, 3-4 9 credits 

Piano, 5-6 , 15 

Theory, 7-8 4 

History of Music, 1-2 2 

English, 7-8 8 

Recital (Optional) (5) 

Fourth Year (Senior). 

Voice, 5-6 9 credits 

History of Music, 3-4 2 

Psychology 2 " 

Theory 9-10-13 5 

Ensemble 2 

Recital , 10 

Electives during course 30 " 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 
First Year. 
Theory 

a. Courses 1-2 (notation, terminology, elementary ear 

training and sight singing) 2 credits 

b. Courses 3-4 (sight singing and ear training) 2 hours 

per week 2 

c. Courses 7-8 (harmony) 2 hours per week 4 " 

d. Melodic construction (Spring term 1 hr. per week) . . 1 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 77 

Pedagody of Music 

a. Methods — Study of Rote Songs (Fall term 1 hour 

per week) 1 

b. Child Voice (Pall term 1 hour per week) 1 " 

c. Primary grades (Spring term 2 hours per week) .... 2 " 

d. Class observation (Spring term 3 hours per week) . . 1 " 
Elementary Psychology (Pall term 3 hours per week) .... 3 " 

History of Music (Pall term 2 hours per week) 4 " 

Piano courses 1-2 15 credits 

Voice courses 1-2 9 " 

Ensemble — Chorus or orchestra 2 " 

Drawing (optional) 8 " 

Second Year. 
Theory 

a. Courses 5-6 (ear training and sight singing) 2 hours 

per week 2 credits 

b. Courses 9-10 (harmony) 2 hours per week 4 " 

c. Elementary Form and Analysis (Pall term 1 hr. per 

week) 1 " 

d. Appreciation (Spring term 1 hour per week) 1 " 

Pedagody of Music 

a. Methods — Intermediate, Grammar and High School 

Chorus conducting. Study and conducting of school 

orchestras (4 hours per week) 8 " 

b. Practice teaching (3 hours per week) 3 " 

History of Education and General Pedagogy 2 " 

Piano courses 3-4 15 " 

Voice courses 3-4 9 " 

Ensemble — Chorus or orchestra 2 " 

Drawing (optional) 8 

COLLEGE AND ACADEMY CREDITS FOR MUSIC 
The College faculty has considered the granting of College and 
Academy credits for work in music, and decided as follows: 

1. That we recognize music as a subject for entrance to college to 
the extent of one-half or one unit. 

2. That we allow ten credits in our academy for a two year course 
in music, as outlined in the accompanying statement, at the rate of 
two credits for each fall term and three for each spring term; provided 
that these credit-hours are entered in the regular way on the student's 
course-slip. 

3. That we allow a maximum of ten credits to students enrolled 
in college, the number of credits per term and the other conditions 
being the same as above stated for academy students. 



78 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

COLLEGE 

Applied Music Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin, or Voice. Advanced grades. 

2 years, one lesson per week. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music. 

Methods — advanced (Including Sight singing, Ear training and 

practise teaching). 
Harmony. 1st year. 
History of Music. 

Ensemble work (Chorus, Orchestra, Band). 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Theory Course. 

Harmony, 2nd year. 

Musical Essentials and appreciation. 

History of Music. 

Ensemble — Chorus, Orchestra or Band. 10 credits. 

ACADEMY 

Applied Course. 

Piano, Organ, Violin or Voice, intermediate grades. 

(2 years, 1 lesson a week). 

Sight singing, 1st and 2nd years. 

2 years. 10 credits. 

Public School Music Course. 
Methods. Primary. 

Sight singing and Ear training, 1st and 2nd years. 
Ensemble. (Chorus, Orchestra or Band.) 
2 years. 10 credits. 

Theory Course. 

Harmony. 1st year. 

Psychology in its relation to Music. 

Sight singing and Ear training, 1st and 2nd years. 

Ensemble. 2 years. 10 credits. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
THE PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT 
The course in pianoforte is designed to equip the student for a career 
as soloist or teacher, or both, and diplomas and certificates are granted 
accordingly. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 79 

The course is based on the dynamic and technical possibilities of the 
modern grand piano and its literature; a comprehensive study of the 
muscles of the shoulder, arm, wrist, hand and finger, the control of 
which is absolutely essential to the attainment of mastery of the art 
of piano-playing. 

The prescribed course requires about five years of the regular student 
of average ability, presuming practically no knowledge of the instru- 
ment when entering the school and also presuming a natural talent 
and maturity of character. 

Due credit will be given to students having completed partial courses 
elsewhere or for work taken under accredited private instructors. 

Advanced and graduate students will have the opportunity of playing 
with instructors in concerted numbers. 

Those not candidates for graduation may have the privilege of elect- 
ing work according to their ability and preparation. 

The course is practically as follows. 

Preparatory. 

Fundamental principles of piano technic applied according to indi- 
vidual needs. Koehler, Op. 50. Sonatinas by Heller and Kuhlau. Easy 
compositions by Reinecke, MacDowell and Lichner. 

First Year. 
Courses 1 — 2. 

Scales and arpeggios: Loeschhorn, Op. 65; Duvernoy, Op. 120; Son- 
atinas by Heller, Lichner and Dussek. Easy compositions by Merkel, 
Jensen, Reinecke and Mendelssohn. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Second Year. 
Courses 3 — 4. 

Major and minor scales in thirds, sixths, octaves and tenths; Seventh 
chord arpeggios. Octave studies begun. Beren's Velocity and works 
of Czerny. Bach, Two and Three-part Inventions. Sonatas by Clementi, 
Haydn and Mozart. Compositions by Grieg, Mendelssohn, Maszkowski, 
Schubert and MacDowell. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

Third Year (Junior). 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Scales and arpeggios in various notions and forms. Tone production 
and study of trill. Selected studies of Cramer; Pedal studies by Gorno 
and Whiting; Kullak, Octave Studies; Preludes and Fugues of Bach. 
Sonatas by Mozart, Weber and Beethoven. Ensemble playing in com- 
positions of modern writers. Compositions by Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schubert, Grieg, MacDowell, etc. 7 — 8=15 credits. 



80 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Fourth Year (Senior). 
Courses 7 — 8. 

Advanced technical work: Clementi, Gradus ad Parnassum; Scales 
in double thirds. Bach, Well Tempered Clavichord. Sonatas by Mozart, 
Schubert and Beethoven. Studies by Chopin, Liszt and Godowsky. 
Various works by romantic composers, viz., Chopin, Liszt, Schubert, 
Arensky, Schumann and Debussy. Concertos by Schumann, Chopin, 
Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Saint-Saens and Grieg. 7 — 8=15 credits. 

The above courses are suggested to give a general idea of the standard 
maintained and cannot be adhered to strictly, as the needs of no two 
individuals are exactly the same. 

Post-Graduate Piano Course. 

This course is established to give the graduates of this school and 
other schools of equal grade, who wish to pursue an artist's career, 
additional training and finish. The course will be two years in length, 
on the completion of which a post-graduate diploma will be given, signed 
by the Director and the instructor. A complete recital must be given by 
each candidate during the second year and a thesis prepared. 

The following works, or their equivalents, represent the post-graduate 
course: 

Last five sonatas by Beethoven. Arrangement of Bach's organ works 
by Liszt, d'Albert and Busoni. Sonatas of Chopin, Liszt, Brahms and 
MacDowell. Paganini-Brahms, Variations. Transcendental Etudes of 
Liszt. Balakirew, Fantasie Orientale "Islamey." Godowsky arrange- 
ments of Chopin Etudes. Concertos by Beethoven, Tschaikowsky, 
Brahms and Liszt. 

Course in Piano Sight-Playing. 
A course in piano sight-playing will be conducted for those who are 
unable to read instrumental music at sight. Proficiency in this subject 
is strictly insisted upon before graduating from the piano department. 
Lessons are given in classes of three and special attention is given to 
rhythm, embellishments, accompaniments and transposition. This 
course is open only to students of courses 5-6-7-8. One year=2 credits. 

Course in Advanced Pedagogy. 
A course in advanced pedagogy is given to equip graduates for their 
profession as teachers of music. This course covers all subjects relating 
to the needs of a musical instructor and is invaluable especially to those 
expecting to devote their lives to the profession of teaching music. 
This course aims to emphasize the essentials in the teacher's equipment. 

Spring term, two periods a week, 2 credits. 

Interpretation Classes. 
The director of the piano department will conduct a course in piano- 
forte interpretation which will be open to seniors and post-graduates 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 81 

of this school and others of equal standing. This course will consist 
of discussion, criticism and demonstration and special coaching for 
individual members preparing for recitals. These classes will be 
limited to six members each. One year=2 credits. 

THE ORGAN DEPARTMENT 
Courses 1 — 2. 

Some good organ school, such as C. E. Clements. Easier trios for 

organ. Hymnology. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4. 

Hymnology (Phrasing, Registration, Transposition). The church 
service. Easier works of Bach, Guilmant, Rheinberger and others. 

4 — 5. 9 credits. 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Practical modulation and accompanying. The larger works of Bach, 
Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Widor and others. At least three sonatas 
from standard works, and three from Bach's studied, a recital to com- 
plete the courses. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Post-Graduate Courses (2 years). 

A continuation of Courses 5 — 6. The larger works of the great mas- 
ters. A comprehensive understanding of the literature for the organ. 

THE VOICE DEPARTMENT 
Foreword 

Prospective students in this department should bear in mind that 
the study of Voice presents some aspects radically at variance with 
piano, organ, violin, or any instrumental study. Of these differences 
the two most important are: 

First, the fact that the playing of a piano, violin, organ, etc., is 
a purely artificial accomplishment — that is, no person by nature and 
with no previous knowledge of a piano or violin can play at all; while 
every human being can to some degree and has from the cradle con- 
stantly produced vocal articulation and sounds. It follows, that varia- 
tions in natural ability to sing in any hundred beginning vocal students 
is much more pronounced; and from this it again follows that any 
curriculum or course of study must be capable of much less rigid 
application in the individual cases, than in the case of piano, violin 
or instrumental study. 

The second point to be remembered is this: In the production of 
tone from any musical instrument — voice, piano, violin, organ, etc., — 
there are three elements: 1) a motor force, 2) a vibrating element, 
and 3) a resonating element, i. e., a sounding board. The important 
fact is often overlooked that in piano study the second and third of 
these elements, i. e., the strings and sounding board, are artificially 

Colltge Catalog. 6. 



82 CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIO 

constructed of steel and wood, in the human voice the entire three 
elements are flesh and blood actuated by the most delicate nervous 
impulses, the exact nature of which is still in doubt in the minds of 
the greatest scientific authorities. 

Any curriculum of Voice study is thus subject to larger modifications 
than is the case in instrumental study, and on the sympathetic insight 
of teacher and the loyal co-operation in mind as well as body of the 
pupil will depend ultimate success. How much of a truth this is — 
how greatly a mental concept of vocal tone transcends any possible 
apposition of ligaments, muscles, etc., however admirable, may be in- 
ferred from the fact that while a beginning piano or violin student is 
generally advised to practise a number of hours daily, Mrs. Marches! 
and Signor Manuel Garcia, perhaps the two greatest authorities in 
the realm of pure Italian "Bel Canto," advise a vocal beginner to 
practise 10 or 15 minutes at a time only, several times daily, — a total 
of not over one hour daily. 

Modified always by the important limitations noted above, the cur- 
riculum for a three year Vocal Course will be as follows: 

Courses 1 — 2. 

(1) A careful preliminary explanation of the vocal functions, breath 
actuation and control; the action of the laryngeal muscular system — 
the "coup de Glotte"; the location and functions of the resonance 
cavities in the head and face, and the articulating mechanism of the 
tongue and jaw. 

(2) The portamento scale; exercises for blending the registers and 
equalizing the scales, when needed. 

(3) Attack and tone placing, with gradual progression in scales and 
arpeggios of increasing speed, power and difficulty. 

(4) Simple songs of a sustained nature, regarded principally as Vocal 
Exercises; also Concone's Vocal Exercises. 

(The basis of study will be the Old Italian Method, as exemplified 
in Marchesi's "Art of Singing," and Garcia's "Art du Chant," which 
will be the text-books used. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Coebses 3 — 4. 

(1) Marchesi and Garcia Exercises continued, including the estab- 
lishing and control of single tones, swelling and diminishing them 
(the old Italian "mezza di voce"). Scales of increasing power and 
agility. 

(2) Songs of increased difficulty and superior classical composition 
and form, increasing the musical and esthetic knowledge and taste of 
the pupil. These songs will include the simpler German Lieder, French 
Chansons,. and a few of the less difficult Opera Arias of a legato nature. 
The attention of the student will then be gradually directed from 
technical considerations — the tone placing, breath control, etc. — to the 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 83 

interpretative side, including careful attention to the woefully neglected 
consideration of pure vowel production and a just enunciation of con- 
sonants and diphthongs. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

Courses 5 — 6. 

Special studies in Agility, Bravura, and the adequate Declamation 
of Recitatives both free and in tempo. Oratorio and Operatic Arias 
of increased difficulty, and the Lieder of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, 
Grieg, Richard Strauss, Max Reger, etc.; French songs of the old 
school, — Gounod, Massanet, Godard; and of the newer school, — De- 
bussy, Ravel, Gabriel Faur6, and Henry DuParc. In brief, as much 
of the required accomplishment of a finished singer as may be per- 
mitted by the time and the capacity, physical and mental, of the pupil. 

On graduation, the student will be expected to sing acceptably, from 
memory, selections from the standard oratories, such as: 

(Soprano) — "Hear ye, Israel," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah"; "With 
Verdure Clad," from Haydn's "Creation"; "I will extol Thee," from 
Costas "Eli," etc. 

(Alto)— "Oh Rest in the Lord," from "Elijah"; "He was despised," 
from Handel's "Messiah." 

(Tenor)— "Be Thou Faithful," from Mendelssohn's "St. Paul"; "Com- 
fort Ye," and "Every Valley," from Handel's "Messiah"; "If with all 
your hearts," from Mendelssohn's "Elijah." 

(Bass) — The "Messiah' solos; "Rolling in Foaming Billows," from 
Haydn's "Creation," and the "Pro Peccatis," from Rossini's "Stabat 
Mater." 

Pupils will also be required to have a reasonable repertoire of the 
standard Operatic Arias, German Lieder, and French and Italian songs 
from the sixteenth century to the present day. All this means con- 
centrated work on the mental equally with the physical side, and it is 
desired that students in this department bring such an attitude to the 
work here indicated. 4 — 5. 9 credits. 

THE VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

The courses in this department cover practically all technical phases 
and styles in violin playing. It is the aim of the department to lay a 
broad and deep foundation and to study the individual needs of the 
student. While the poetical or interpretative side of playing is always 
kept in mind, the student is early given to understand that teehnic 
is the real liberator of the spirit within, the means by which the spirit 
expresses itself, and must, therefore, be most carefully and diligently 
studied with that end In view. 

All students are given the privilege of ensemble practise. Advanced 
students are required to attend orchestral rehearsals regularly and 
must learn to play the viola, subject, however, to the discretion of the 
teacher. 



84 CONSEBVATOBY OF MUSIC 

Preparatory. 
Laoreaux Violin School; Sevcik, Op. 6; Wohlfart, Op. 54; Kayser, 
Op. 20, Bk. 1. Easy pieces and duos by Beazley, Dancla, Rosenbecker, 
and others. 

First Year. 
Coubses 1 — 2. 

Laoreaux Violin School, Part II; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. I, and Op. 2; 
Wohlfart, Op. 74; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. II; Sevcik, Op. 7 and Op. 8, 
begun. Selected pieces and duos. 7 — 8. 15 credits. 

Second Year. 
Coubses 3 — 4. 

David's Violin School, Part II; Kayser, Op. 20, Bk. Ill; Mazas, Op. 
36, Bks. I and II; Sevcik, Op. 8, continued; Bauer, Scales and Arpeggios; 
Sevcik, Op. 2; Kreutzer Etudes begun. Pieces by Bach, Handel, etc., 
sonatas by Haydn and Mozart, concertos by De Beriot, Kreutzer, and 
Viotti. 7—8. 15 credits. 

Third Year (Junior). 
Courses 5 — 6. 

Kreutzer Etudes; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bk. Ill; Sevcik, Op. 2; Fiorillo 
Etudes; sonatas, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, and pieces from 
various composers; concertos by De Beriot, Mozart, Rode, Viotti. 

7—8. 15 credits. 

Fourth Year (Senior). 
Courses 7 — 8. 

Rode, 24 caprices; Rovelli, 12 studies; Sevcik, Op. 1, Bks. Ill and IV; 
concertos and concert pieces by Rode, Spohr, Hubay, Wieniawski and 
others. 7 — 8. 15 credits. 

Post-Graduate Courses (2 Years) 
Bach solo sonatas; Grand studies by Gavinies, Dont, Paganini, etc.; 
standard concertos and concert pieces by modern composers. 

Viola and Violincello 

Courses in Viola and 'Cello playing are also offered which are de- 
signed to equip the student for general solo and orchestra work. 

Accompanying and Ensemble 

The director of the violin department will give a course in accom- 
panying and in piano and string ensemble to which players of the 
piano who are sufficiently advanced will be admitted. Standard violin 
solos and sonatas for piano and violin will be studied and played. 
Opportunity will also be given to study trios, quartets, etc., in which 
case practise may be had in playing with the chamber music organiza- 
tions. (See page 122). 



OONSEBVATORY OF MUSIC 85 

THE THEORY DEPARTMENT 
NOTE. Courses marked with an asterisk are free, subject to rules and regulations. 

*Courses 1 — 2. Sight singing and ear training. 

2 hours a week. 2 credits. 
"Courses 3 — 4. Sight singing and ear training. 

2 hours a week. 2 credits. 
♦Courses 5 — 6. Notation study of the scales. 

1 hour a week. 2 credits. 
Courses 7 — 8. Harmony — Intervals, triads, seventh chords. 

Harmonization of melodies. 2 hours a week. 4 credits. 

Courses 9 — 10. Altered chords, suspensions, foreign tones. 

Harmonization of melodies. 2 hours a week. 4 credits. 

Courses 11 — 12. Counterpoint. 2 half hours a week. 4 credits. 

♦Course 13. Analysis and Appreciation. 1 hour a week. 1 credit. 

♦Course 14. The Orchestra and its instruments. 

1 hour a week. 1 credit. 
♦History of Music. Courses 1 — 2, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 

Courses 3 — 4, 1 hour per week. 2 credits. 
♦Psychology in its relation to music. 1 hour a week. 2 credits. 

♦Lectures on Liturgies. 1 credit. 

♦Lectures on Physics of sound. 1 credit. 

♦Ensemble work (Chorus, Orchestra or Band) and accompaniment. 

2 credits. 
Sight Playing. 1 hour a week. 1 credit. 

♦Normal work. Lectures on touch and tone formation. Teaching 
repertoire. Practical work under the supervision of the teacher. 

1 hour a week. 1 credit. 

HISTORY OF MUSIC 
To properly understand music or any other art, it is necessary to 
have a knowledge of the history of its development and an acquaintance 
with the conditions under which it began and reached its maturity. 
Two courses in Music History are offered. The first course gives a 
general survey of music and its development from the earliest times 
to the present; the second course embraces special topics in the History 
of Music. Each course 2 credits. 

PSYCHOLOGY IN MUSIC 
Psychology is now regarded as the fundamental science, the science 
which must shape the methods of studying and teaching every other 
subject. Correct scientific knowledge of the human mind and of its 
various modes of activity, together with a working knowledge of the 
nervous system, lies at the bottom of all educational philosophy. Psy- 
chology stands in a most important and practical relation to the study 
of music. The demand of the present is that methods of studying and 



86 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

teaching music must be based on sound pedagogical and rational prin- 
ciples, and it is the office of psychology to discover and formulate such 
principles. The signs of the times indicate that along this line of 
progress the best results are to be achieved for the years to come. 
Augustana Conservatory, recognizing these facts and principles, makes 
the study of psychology an important part in its courses of study. 
A full course on the Relation of Psychology to Music is given, extending 
thruout the year, which all candidates for graduation are required to 
take. 2 credits. 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC DEPARTMENT 
To meet the requirements of the supervisor and special teacher of 
music in the public schools, a two year course is offered, tho the time 
required for the completion of the work depends on the ability and 
training, the student has had previous to entrance. Those students 
who have a general musical education, may at entrance take an ex- 
amination, and, if they pass, arrangements will be made, so that they 
may complete the course in less time. 

The law of the State of Illinois requires graduation from a four 
years' high school, or an equivalent preparation, including four units 
in English. If less than four secondary units in English are certified, 
one year must be pursued in College. This course having been planned 
in conformity with the requirements of the state laws, our diploma is 
accepted as a proof of efficiency, and a State certificate granted to the 
holder upon application to the Department of Public Instruction. If a 
high school course has not been completed students may take the course 
in the Academy here, and complete it while carrying on the work in 
music. Extra time will be necessary in this case. A certificate is 
granted to students completing the course in Methods including Ear 
training, Sight singing, Harmony, Practise teaching and History of 
Music. 

Theory — Courses 1 and 2. 

Notation and terminology — A complete review of rudiments, major 

and minor scales, key signatures, key relation, rhythmic types, 

rhythmic figures, ear training. In this course the pupil gains 

the power to think notes and sense rhythm. 
Sight reading — In order to complete this course pupils must be 

able to sing at sight, in all keys, including the divided beat and 

simple chromatic progressions. 

Solfeggio Melodia Book I. 

Theory — Courses 3 and 4. 

Ear Training — Longer phrases in major and minor keys, also 

chromatic progressions. Intervals and two-part phrase. 
Sight Singing — Skips to and from chromatic tones. 

Solfeggio Melodia Book II. 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 87 

Theory — Courses 5 and 6. 

Ear Training — Harmonic. The primary and secondary triads of 
the major and minor scales. Cadences. Modulations. 

Sight Singing — Advanced Solfeggio Melodia Book III. 

Child Voice — The protection, possibilities, and compass of the child 
voice. The girl and the boy voice compared. Mutation, special 
attention to the less gifted child, treatment of monotones. 

Melodic construction and Elementary Form. The principles gov- 
erning progression of tones, and the relatives of accent to meter; 
rhythmic varieties applied to melody. The phrase period. The 
two and three part form. 

Pedagogy of Music. 

This course is devoted to the study of methods and material. 
Special attention is given to the selection, teaching and inter- 
pretation of rote songs. The work of each grade is taken up 
in detail and the problems of melody and rhythm are classified, 
systematically arranged, presented and drilled. The various 
series of books published for public school use are examined, in 
order that the student may be familiar with the best material 
available and know how to use the same to best advantage. 
Practise teaching is done, under critic teacher, a complete eighth 
grade school affords an opportunity for teaching under super- 
vision and criticism of the instructor. Special attention is given 
to the work of the high school, courses outlined in musical 
appreciation, sight singing, theory, history of music. Other 
topics considered are: the school chorus, orchestra, glee clubs, 
and a practical course of conducting. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
TIME NECESSARY 
The time required to finish any of the preceding courses is different 
according to the circumstances. First, it depends on the pupil's ad- 
vancement on entering the Conservatory, and secondly, on his talents 
and industry. 

It is advisable to take ample time for the work required, as hurried 
work never brings satisfactory results. 

EXAMINATIONS 
Final examinations in the instrumental and vocal departments are 
not left to the sole approval of the individual teachers, but must be 
held before the President and Conservatory faculty. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 
1. Students are not received at the beginning of the term for a 
shorter period than a whole term. All pupils entering the Conservatory 



88 CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

after the beginning of the term must register at the rate of single les- 
sons for the remainder of the term, which means a loss of discount to 
those taking two lessons per week. 

2. Pupils obliged to leave during any term are given no rebates un- 
less for a continuous half term's absence. In special cases of protracted 
illness extending over two or more weeks the pupil will be allowed the 
privilege of taking the lost lessons in a later term, provided notice 
of such illness has been given at once to the professor in charge of the 
subject. 

3. Upon leaving the Conservatory each pupil is entitled to a testi- 
monial, specifying the time passed at the institution and the standing 
in the studies pursued. 

4. Regular attendance of pupils is expected at all recitals and con- 
certs given by the faculty and students. 

5. No student during his senior year will be allowed to appear in 
public without permission from his teacher. 

6. Altho not compulsory, it is advisable that pupils in all depart- 
ments take two lessons per week. 

7. Students taking two private lessons a week, are entitled to three 
free subjects in Theory, and two subjects in the Academy or Freshman 
year in College without extra charge. Students taking one lesson a 
week will be entitled to one free subject, in Theory only. 

TUITION 

J. Victor Bergqutst, Arvid Samuelson, Axgert Anker, Ivar Skougaard 

Two lessons a week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $22.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 22.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 27.00 

Single lessons 1.50 

Preparatory and intermediate grade students in Violin may be given 
a reduction in tuition, subject, however, to the discretion of the Director 
and the teacher. 

Althea Brown 

Two lessons per week: 

First fall term (8 weeks) $12.00 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 12.00 

First spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 15.00 

Single lessons 1.00 

Esther Fryxell and LeRoy Carlson 
Two lessons per week: 
First fall term (8 weeks) $ 9.60 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 89 

Second fall term (8 weeks) 9.60 

First spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Second spring term (10 weeks) 12.00 

Single lessons 75 

Classes in Theory 

Two hour lessons per week: 

First fall term $ 8.00 

Second fall term 8.00 

First spring term ,. . . 10.00 

Second spring term 10.00 

One hour periods, $4.00 and $5.00 per term. 
Student Instructors 

A special children's beginners class under the supervision of the 
teachers of the Conservatory, will be organized, the lessons to be given 
by students in the Junior and Senior Years. 

Tuition for these classes 

One lesson, private, per week: 

First fall term $2.00 

Second fall term , 2.00 

First spring term 2.50 

Second spring term , 2.50 

Any student enrolled for one lesson, or regular students from other 
departments who wish to take up any of the free subjects in theory, 
can do so at the rate of $1.50 for each fall term and $2.00 for each 
spring term. 

Public School Music 

Pedagogy of Music (including Methods and Practise teaching) : 

Each fall term $16.00 

Each spring term , 20.00 

Methods (partial course) per week 1.00 

(Including sight singing and ear training.) 

Theory (see tuition for classes in courses in Theory). 

Piano, Voice, Violin or Organ (see terms of the different teachers). 

For all free subjects, see Rules and Regulations. 

Other Expenses in the Conservatory 

1. Diplomas in any of the courses $5.00 

2. Rental — Pedal organ, one hour a day, per hour 15 

Rental— Pipe Organ, per hour 25 & .30 

3. Rental — Piano, 1 hour a day, per month 1.00 

Rental — Piano, 2 hours a day, per month 1.90 

Rental — Piano, 3 hours a day, per month 2.50 

Additional hours, per month, per hour 50 

4. Registration fee per conservatory term 50 

5. Physical Culture (optional). 



90 SCHOOL OF AKT 



THE SCHOOL OF ART 



Olof Grafstrom, Artist. 

From the Royal Academy of Art, Stockholm, Sweden. 

In connection with the Conservatory of Music instruction is given in 
Drawing and Designing in the various branches of Painting. 

SCOPE OP WORK 

Thoro instruction is given in Drawing, Light and Shade, Still-life, the 
Cast, Antique, Fruits, Flowers, Decorative work, etc., thru the usual 
mediums, Oil, Charcoal, Crayon and Pencil. 

The methods are such as will lead most directly to work from nature 
and life, an end so easily attained by any earnest art student. 

ANTIQUE 
The advantages of this study from the antique cast are the knowl- 
edge we get of the ideal human form and the opportunity it affords the 
student for careful, cool, reflective study, thus fortifying the student 
against the difficulties occurring in work from life. 

SKETCH CLASS 
A sketch class, from life, is formed, care being taken so to arrange 
the pose that the students' sketches may be of service to them when 
they wish to introduce a figure into landscape-sketches or compositions. 

LIFE OR PORTRAIT CLASS 
The object of this study is to give the students a thoro drill in the 
study of realistic flesh-color, expression, position, drapery, harmony, etc. 

PORTRAITS 

Instruction will be given to those wishing to color photographs (the 
Solar print) in oil or water colors, or finish in India-Ink. 

Any one with ordinary ability can, by this means, soon learn to 
execute life-size portraits nearly as perfect as the photographs from 
which they are taken, and often with better expression. 

SACRED ART 
Prof. Grafstrom has during the year, as during previous years, 
painted a large number of altar pieces for churches in all parts of the 
country, and these works of sacred art are more and more becoming 
recognized as productions of the very highest artistic merit. Congre- 
gations desiring to adorn their houses of worship with appropriate altar 



SCHOOL OF AET 91 

pieces of thoro artistic design and execution should communicate with 
Prof. Grafstrom. 

ART EXHIBITION 
During Commencement week, a free exhibition in the Art Room is 
given, which will explain, better than words, the grade and success of 
the work done in the School of Art. 

TUITION IN ART DEPARTMENT 

Each fall term, of 8 weeks, two lessons per week $15.00 

Each spring term, of 11 weeks, two lessons per week 21.00 

Annual Registration Fee 1.00 

A student paying the above tuition in advance is allowed to work in 
the Art Room five days of each week. 

Arrangements for a smaller number of lessons per week can be made 
with the professor of the subject. 

CALENDAR 

See page 70. 



92 ELOCUTION 



ELOCUTION 



Iva Cabbie Peabce, So. B., B.E. 

The training offered the pupil in the department of oral expression 
has for its aims: 

1. The cultivation of observation, reasoning, memory and poetic 
imagination. 

2. The development of the individuality of each pupil. 

3. The freeing of his voice and body for the full manifestation of 
thought and emotion. 

4. To give him command of himself and skill in the use of his 
several powers. 

5. To arouse in him a desire to know the best in literature, and to 
vocally interpret it. 

6. To awaken the mind of each student to a just appreciation of the 
correlation of the arte. 

The following courses are offered. 

A fundamental course in articulation, pronunciation, phrasing, prin- 
ciples of grouping, oodily expression, and voice culture. 

A course in the analytical study and vocal interpretation of the best 
English and American writers. 

A course in dramatic expression. 

A course in public speaking in which pupils are trained to "think 
upon their feet," and express themselves in clear forcible speech. 

Constant endeavor is used to make all the work of this department 
of practical service to the student either as a means of general culture 
or as a training in more adequate and effective expression of himself 
in the business of every day life. 

GRADUATION 
A diploma is given upon the completion of the following course: 

First Year 



SPBING 


TEEM 






FALL TEBM 


Fundamental Principles of 


Ex- 




Fundamental Principles of Ex- 


pression 






4 


pression 4 


Voice Culture 






1 


Voice Culture 1 


Vocal Expression 






3 


Vocal Expression 3 


English 






3 


English 3 


Physical Culture 






1 


Physical Culture 1 


Psychology 






3 


Dramatic Art 3 



ELOCUTION 93 

Second Year 

FALL TEEM SPBINQ TEEM 

Vocal Expression 3 Vocal Expression 3 

Development of Expression 4 Public Speaking 4 

Oratory 3 Literary Interpretation 3 

Recitals 3 Recitals 5 
Bodily Expression 2 

Entrance Requirements 120 credits earned in any recognized high 
school or academy. 

Pupils taking two private lessons a week receive class instruction 
without extra charge. 

TUITION IN THE DEPARTMENT OF ELOCUTION 

Each fall term of 8 weeks: 

One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each $12.00 

One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 6.00 

Each spring term of 10 weeks: 

One private lesson per week, 60 minutes each $15.00 

One private lesson per week, 30 minutes each 7.50 

CALENDAR 

See page 70. 



94 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



The Commercial Department 



FACULTY 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

ANDREW KEMPE, A.B., M. Accts., LL.B., 

Principal of Commercial Department. 

ARTHUR ANDERSON MILTON, LL.B., M. Accts., Secretary, 

Teacher of Penmanship, Bookkeeping, Banking, Advanced Accounting, Typewriting , and 

Arithmetic. 

VERA CELESTIA HOVEY, 

Teacher of Shorthand, English, and Office Training. 

ROY MONROE CONRAD, B.S., 

Teacher of Arithmetic and Spelling. 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

Thirty years ago the Board of Directors of Augustana College, 
perceiving the great demand for practical business training among the 
youth of this country, founded in intimate connection with other de- 
partments of the institution, the Augustana Commercial Department. 
This department has since grown, from a comparatively small begin- 
ning, into a thoroly equipped business training school, preparing annu- 
ally, in a most thoro manner, a large number of young people for the 
various lines of business. 

The department offers two courses of study which are as complete, 
symmetrical, and practical as untiring efforts, close observation of 
business methods, and experience can render them. Instruction in the 
Christian religion is also provided for in that a regular course of Bible 
Study is offered to all students. The faculty is composed of skilled and 
carefully trained teachers, and the patronage consists of a class of 
young people who are characterized by intelligence, good character, 
ambition, and an earnest devotion to their own real interests. 

Course Leading to Graduate Accountant. 

Entrance Requirements: 

The entrance requirements for this course is the completion of 
Eighth Grade work, or its equivalent. 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 95 

Course. 

1. Bookkeeping 10 houi's a week for 34 weeks. 

Four Sets of "20th" Century Bookkeeping. 

Office Practise in College Bookkeeping 2 weeks. 

2. Commercial Arithmetic 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Civil Government 5 hours a week for 16 weeks. 

4. Commercial Law 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

5. Penmanship 4 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Spelling and Denning 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

7. Correspondence 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

8. English Grammar 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

(Academy I or equivalent.) 

9. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of from 60% to 

79% on Final Examination (excepting Spelling 90%) will be entitled 
to a Certificate for such work. 

Students completing the above course with a grade of 80% or more 
on Final Examinations (except Spelling 90%) will be entitled to the 
degree Graduate Accountant. 

The following subjects are offered as electives. 

1. Advanced Accountancy 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

Wholesale Accounting. 

Commission and Jobbing. 
Cost Accounting. 
American National Banking. 
Adding Machine Exercises. 

Special Sets: 
Lumber Accounts. 
Farm Accounts. 
Furniture Accounts. 

2. Lettering and Ornate Penmanship . . 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Advertising and Salesmanship 1 hour a week for 16 weeks. 

STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 

1. Stenography 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

2. Typewriting 10 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

3. Spelling and Defining 3 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

4. English 5 hours a week for 36 weeks. 

5. Office Training 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

6. Christianity 1 hour a week for 36 weeks. 

7. Commercial Law 5 hours a week for 20 weeks. 

Students completing the above course with less than three years of 

Academic English will be entitled to the usual Stenographic Diploma. 
Students completing the above course with three years or more of 
Academic English will be entitled to a parchment diploma with 
distinction Graduate Stenographer. 



96 COMMEECIAL DEPAETMEXT 

REMARKS ON COURSES OF STUDY 
BOOKKEEPING 

The student assumes the position of bookkeeper for some person 
engaged in business at the beginning of his work, and continues in this 
capacity until the course is completed. This is much better than 
having him use his own name and keep books for himself, since it 
is a known fact that very few men engaged in business keep their 
own books, this being done by the bookkeeper who is employed for 
that purpose. The student receives a salary from the beginning until 
the work is completed, the same being increased from time to time as 
his knowledge of bookkeeping increases. He makes no entries on his 
books except from the transactions made by his employer, which are 
indicated to him by the business papers representing the transaction, 
or by direct instruction of his employer. These business papers and 
instructions are put up in envelops designed "Business Transactions," 
as explained hereafter. 

Since the student, who has assumed the position of bookkeeper, 
knows nothing in regard to the principles of bookkeeping, or the 
method of recording the transactions, it is necessary that he be given 
instructions in regard to these. The instructions are contained in a 
book, designated as the "Reference Book," and the student is given 
references to this book by either paragraph number or the page on 
which the transactions are to be found. Thus when he opens an 
envelop and finds therein a business transaction, he is given any needed 
instruction by his employer in regard to this, and is then referred to 
the Reference Book for the principles involved and the method of 
recording the transaction on his books. 

PART I 

The object of this work is to give the student a thoro explanation 
of the principles of bookkeeping and their application. In this work 
only two books are introduced, the Journal as the book of original 
entry, and the Ledger, as that of complete entry. By constant use of 
the Journal where the debits and credits of each transaction are 
clearly set forth, the student will soon learn that each transaction 
must affect at least two accounts, each amount being equal, and that 
where more than two accounts are affected, the debits and credits 
arising therefrom must be equal. 

The transactions to be recorded cover a period of three months' 
time, January, February, and March. For the first few days' work, 
only one transaction is placed in an envelop, which is to prevent the 
student from getting confused, but after the first few days' work Is 
completed a number of transactions are placed in each envelop and 
cover a period of two or three days. Each business paper, which 
represents a transaction to the student, is a reproduction of some form 
in use by some business house or bank. The transactions are identical 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 97 

with those in any business community, the student assuming the 
position of bookkeeper for Mr. Goodwin, who is engaged in the retail 
grocery business. In this work the student takes off four Trial 
Balances, makes three Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger three 
times. In addition he is given a thoro drill in bill making, writing 
notes and checks, dealing with a bank, and the handling of the various 
other business papers used in every day business. The explanation 
for the doing of each of these is given in the Reference Book. 

PART II 
In this work the student assumes the position of bookkeeper for 
C. W. Kneeland, who is engaged in retail business. The object of this 
work is to teach the practical application of the principles of debits 
and credits by introducing the Sales-book, Invoice-book, and Cash- 
book. The student is given a thoro explanation of the uses and 
advantages of each of these, also an analysis showing the work saved 
by their introduction. The work of this part covers a period of three 
months, each envelop containing the instructions for three days. In 
addition to learning the use of the above-named books, the student is 
taught how to render statements of accounts to customers on the first 
of the month, the use of special columns in the Cash-book ? the entries 
required when a partner is admitted into the business, and various 
other important points. In this work the student takes off three Trial 
Balances, makes two Balance Sheets, and closes the Ledger twice. The 
Trial Balances have from 50 to 65 accounts, which makes the work 
more interesting to the student, it being necessary for him to depend 
on his own accuracy in keeping a history of so many accounts. 

PARTS III AND IV 
Part III introduces Wholesale bookkeeping, and Part IV Corporation 
and Manufacturing. The two cover a period of four months and 
require four Trial Balances, two Balance Sheets, and the closing of 
the Ledger twice. The transactions are identical with those which 
occur in the territory of any wholesale house. The advantages of 
special ruling, loose leaf devices, and the various short cuts used in 
modern accounting are clearly set forth. An opportunity is given 
the student to practically apply his knowledge of bookkeeping and test 
his ability to keep books. 

BANKING 
Each student of bookkeeping is a bookkeeper, doing the work just 
as it is done in an office. Since the bookkeepers in the business world, 
to a certain extent, make the transactions for the banks, the students 
will make the transactions for a bank in the school room. The checks 
and money which he receives must be deposited; drafts and other 
papers left for collection; notes discounted; New York exchange pur- 
chased; change obtained; checks certified; and there are various other 

College Catalog. 7. 



98 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

transactions which the bookkeeper must transact with the bank. By 
having the advanced student act as a banker for those students in the 
bookkeeping work, an excellent practical course in banking is obtained. 
The student in the bank learns to make the proper record on the 
Individual Ledger, Collection and Discount Register, New York Ex- 
change Book Teller's Book, Remittance Register, General Cash Book, 
and General Ledger. 

ARITHMETIC AND RAPID CALCULATION 

Special attention is paid to the work in this branch, and very com- 
plete courses are offered. No student can expect to progress satisfac- 
torily in the science of accounts, without having a thoro understanding 
of the subject of Arithmetic. One hour's class work a day during the 
entire course is devoted to the subject in general, and a half-hour each 
day is devoted to exercises in rapid addition, substraction, multiplica- 
tion, fractions, interest, discount, averaging accounts, etc. These drills 
are of the greatest value, making the students not only rapid and 
accurate, but giving them confidence in themselves. 

CIVIL GOVERNMENT 

The education of an American citizen must always be considered 
incomplete without a thoro knowledge of the government under which 
he lives. The Commercial Department, therefore, offers a complete 
course in Civil Government. The subject is taught in such a manner 
as to acquaint the student with the functions of the various parts of 
the government machinery, the relations of the states to each other 
and to the general government and such other facts as will enable 
him to perform intelligently the duties of citizenship. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

Altho the student is carefully drilled in the execution of business 
papers while pursuing the study of Bookkeeping, a course in Commer- 
cial Law is added to supplement his knowledge. It is not expected 
that the student will acquire professional knowledge of the subjects, 
as this would require a thoro course in a school of law. The purpose 
is to acquaint him thoroly with the legal principles which constitute 
the foundation of law. The course embraces thoro instruction in the 
following branches of business law: Contracts, Negotiable Papers, 
Guaranty and Suretyship, Interest and Usury, Sales of Personal Prop- 
erty, Bailments, Agency, Partnership, Joint-Stock Companies, Corpora- 
tions, Fire, Life, and Marine Insurance. The student is required to 
commit to memory many of the legal papers, thus enabling him to 
draw them without referring to a book of forms, 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 99 

PENMANSHIP 
All students receive daily drills in Business Writing. A clean, legible, 
rapid business hand is not an inherited gift; but any person of good 
intelligence may secure such a hand, unless physically unable to learn. 
The time required to accomplish this result varies from three months 
to one year, and is dependent upon previous opportunities and natural 
aptitude. A special Penmanship diploma is awarded to those who 
acquire proficiency in plain business writing. 

SPELLING AND DEFINING 

Daily written exercises of graded work are given. The student is 
not only taught to spell and pronounce words, but is required to define 
and memorize them, thus greatly increasing his readiness in the use 
of English. 

PRACTICAL ENGLISH 

The ability to write the English language fluently and correctly is 
a great accomplishment for any young man or woman. Special atten- 
tion is therefore given to grammatical drill and to correct use of the 
English language in speaking and writing. 

BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE 
This feature of the course aims to give the pupil such suggestions 
regarding the requisites of correspondence as will enable him to con- 
struct, arrange, paragraph, and punctuate a business letter, so that 
it shall convey its intended meaning without unnecessary verbiage or 
confusion, and shall appear to the best advantage. 

ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY 

At the outset an apparatus and a reference book, containing the 
principles and laws of bookkeeping, are put into the hands of the 
student and are employed by him for the purpose of carrying on all 
the practical business operations and bookkeeping entries which are 
daily performed in regular business offices. 

The apparatus consists of a Bureau which contains a budget of series 
of transactions. The budget consists of a number of sheets or leaves 
secured together, upon which are printed the necessary instructions 
and between which are contained the business papers, vouchers, and 
other memoranda, which furnish to the student the data from which 
he makes the proper entries, and performs the necessary office work. 

Each budget is so arranged that as each sheet or leaf is raised or 
torn off, the business papers, etc., of the transaction, or number of 
transactions, are exposed for the consideration of the student. The 
sheets are so secured that the interleaved matter cannot be removed 
or examined until the sheet and business papers are torn off or re- 
moved. 



100 COM^IEECIAL DEPABTMEXT 

WHOLESALE SET 

The purpose of this set is to illustrate a wholesale business con- 
ducted by a partnership, at first consisting of two persons. An addi- 
tional partner is admitted later. The business of a wholesale grocery- 
house is represented, with many of the peculiarities of the trade in 
groceries treated incidentally. The terms of credit, discounts, busi- 
ness methods, form and customs of this and many other wholesale 
lines are fully discused and carefully observed in working up the set. 

This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
January, February, March, and April in which ten different books are 
introduced. 

The transactions for the months of January and February are il- 
lustrated by all the business papers received and issued. The trans- 
actions for March and April are supplied in memorandum form, the 
purpose being to direct the student's attention to the use of special 
columns in the various books of account. The business papers are 
omitted, because he has had ample practise in the preparation of all 
classes of papers pertaining to this line of business in the work of the 
two preceding months. 

A valuable feature is the very full information given in regard to 
the established customs, practices and usages that are everywhere 
followed in executing the various transactions illustrated. 

JOBBING AND COMMISSION SET. 

This set illustrates the business of a jobbing and commission house 
conducted as a corporation. The transactions illustrate the organiza- 
tion of a corporation, the issuing of the certificates of stock and the 
opening of the books, the series covering every phase of the jobbing 
and commission business with numerous closings of the books showing 
the disposition of the profits in accordance with the various instruc- 
tions of the Board of Directors. 

In addition to the transaction recorded in the regular set of books 
the budget contains a series of supplementary exercises in corporation 
accounts, for the opening and closing of corporation accounts and 
books under all the conditions to be met with, which are explained 
and elucidated for the training of the student. 

COST ACCOUNTING 
This is also a corporation set and introduces the special features 
of Cost Accounting. The business is conducted for the purpose of 
manufacturing gas engines, and includes the ordering of the parts, 
and, in some instances, their manufacture. The machining and as- 
sembling of the parts, and the completion of the engines called for in 
production orders, are based upon figures taken from actual production 
orders of a large manufacturer of gas engines. Indeed, the different 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 101 

manufacturing costs are taken from actual figures, with slight varia- 
tions here and there, to bring about such results as are necessary to 
illustrate the different phases of practical manufacturing. 

Time tickets, payroll sheets and other incidental papers and forms 
are used. Every detail of the business of an actual manufacturing 
concern is shown, and the various features of the usual manufacturing 
business have been so fully and carefully covered that the set can be 
used as a perfect illustration of a system of manufacturing accounts 
which may be installed in any concern, whether of large or small 
proportions. 

In working up the set, the student fills various positions. He acts 
as the bookkeeper in recording transactions to the general books, as 
an accountant in the preparation of various statements and other 
documents required to exhibit the results of the business transacted, 
as stores or material clerk, as cost clerk in recording the cost of 
materials, labor and manufacturing expenses on production orders and 
in figuring the cost of finished goods, as stock clerk and as payroll 
and time clerk. 

BANKING 

This set introduces the subject of American National Banking, in a 
very interesting and complete manner. 

ADVERTISING AND SALESMANSHIP 
The aim of this course is to emphasize the essential principles of 
Salesmanship and their application. In the course of the year the 
student is required to make selling talks. 

LETTERING AND ORNATE PENMANSHIP 
It is the aim of these subjects to teach the student such lettering 

and writing as may be used in marking packages, labels, diagrams, 

plans, index records, documents, titles, show card writing, commercial 

designs, etc. 

THE STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 
The principal aim of this course is to fit young men and women for 

positions as stenographers or private secretaries. 
Class instruction is given, and so suited to the peculiarities of each 

student as to bring out the best results possible. 

STENOGRAPHY 

Our Shorthand Course qualifies young men and women for high- 
class positions in all lines of stenographic work, as amanuenses, 
teachers in business colleges, and for the Civil Service. 

The Gregg System of Shorthand has been taught in our school, and 
proved a system of results. 

After having completed the theory, the student enters upon the 



102 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

work in the Gregg Speed Studies, and the New Universal Dictation 
Course. These are text-books designed as guides to the work of ac- 
curate reporting. The Gregg Speed Studies contains letters that have 
been selected with great care to eliminate everything that does not 
comply with the best usage. The articles have been selected for their 
literary, informational, and vocabulary-building value. Many of the 
articles are similar to those employed in the United States Civil Serv- 
ice examinations. 

PHRASEOGRAPHY 

The student is taught to phrase the most common expressions of 
the English language by joining shorthand characters. The purpose 
of joining words and phrases is to eliminate the loss of time occa- 
sioned by passing from one word to another. The student devotes 
sufficient practise to these outlines to be able to execute them with 
rapidity and accuracy. 

DICTATION 

The Dictation Course is open only to students who have completed 
the Shorthand theory. The instruction is logical, and well-planned. 
Business letters, covering a wide range of subjects, are dictated to the 
student who takes them down in shorthand, and then transcribes them 
quickly and neatly upon the typewriter. These letters are then handed 
to the instructor to be corrected. Thus, the student's attention is 
called to his deficiencies. Naturally, the course is highly concentrated. 
Every moment of time must count for the up-building of accuracy, 
speed, and future Shorthand efficiency. 

SPEED-CLASSES, DRILLS, ETC. 
The students of the Speed-Classes in Shorthand and Typewriting are 
promoted according to their progress. The Shorthand Speed-Classes 
are given tests weekly. The first test consists of two letters dictated 
at 65 and 70 words per minute, and transcribed within twenty minutes 
upon the typewriter, with a grade af 90%. These tests are increased 
in speed, according to the progress of the student, until 115 words per 
minute is attained. A 500 word article, dictated at 100 words per 
minute, and turned in within twenty minutes, 95% perfect is given as 
the graduation test. 

OFFICE TRAINING 

The Office Training Course is a grouping of closely related subjects 
of the commercial course that are regarded as indispensable by bus- 
iness men. The students are taught to write letters of application for 
various positions. Some of the students are given personal interviews 
before the class, which is made very interesting, the teacher taking 
the point of view of the employer. Certain students are then em- 
ployed as stenographers and bookkeepers, performing their duties a- 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 103 

bout the office, which gives them training that increases their value 
in the business world. 

The student is taught how to arrange business letters attractively, 
to fold letters properly, and how to enclose remittances, etc. The 
various systems of filing are taught, each student filing his own letters. 
The operation of the dictaphone is carefully explained, and its ad- 
vantages discussed. 

SPELLING 

The course offered in this subject is calculated to correct errors of 
spelling and fix in the mind of the future stenographer not only the 
orthography of the word, but its usual meaning. 

ENGLISH 

Three years of High School English or its equivalent is required for 
graduation in the shorthand course. 

COMMERCIAL LAW 

A course in Commercial Law is also required in the Shorthand De- 
partment. 

CREDITS 
For credits given for work in the Commercial Department see Elec- 
tive Units, page 17 of this catalog. 

TEXT-BOOKS AND STATIONERY 

The cost of text-books and stationery for the full business course 
varies from $10 to $13; blank books and forms are made to order from 
the best quality of paper. The cost of books, etc., for the course in 
shorthand is about $6.50. 

TIME REQUIRED 

To complete the Business course, the bright, ambitious student aver- 
ages about nine months, altho many remain longer. Students are 
advanced as rapidly as is consistent with thoro work. 

To become proficient in phonography, typewriting, etc., to fill a first- 
class situation acceptably, the average learner requires from five to 
eight months. Students acquainted with business forms, already well 
drilled in spelling, grammar, punctuation, etc., have been prepared in 
three to five months sufficiently well to take fairly good positions. 
Unless compelled to do so by special circumstances, it is not advisable 
to rush unduly thru the work, as those who take a thoro course are 
practically certain of a higher salary and more permanent employment. 



104 COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 

FURTHER INFORMATION 



BUILDINGS 
The College building is neatly and comfortably furnished turnout 
and heated by steam. Nothing which can add to the comfort, conve- 
nience and utility of a first class school has been omitted in the general 
equipment. 

RECITATION HOURS 
The regular hours of study and recitations are from 8 a. m. to 4 
p. m., five days of the week. Regular hours each week are set aside 
for physical training in a well-equipped gymnasium. 

DISCIPLINE 

It is assumed that the young men who enter this institution are 
gentlemen, and they are treated uniformly as such. The development 
of other characteristics will immediately sever the student's connec- 
tion with the school. 

GRADUATION AND DIPLOMA 

The requirements for graduation in the different courses are simply 
sufficient to give a high standing to the courses and to insure the 
ability of graduates to fill and retain satisfactorily first class positions. 

In order to secure the degree of Graduate Accountant, it is necessary 
to pass a grade of 80% in all final examinations except in spelling in 
which a grade of 90% is required. Students completing the Graduate 
Accountant course but failing to secure 80% in one or more subjects, 
will be given a diploma. In the Stenographic course, the average 
working speed of one hundred words per minute in Phonography for 
not less than 10 consecutive minutes and an average speed of not less 
than 40 words net per minute is required in typewriting. 

All degrees and diplomas will be awarded at the annual graduation 
exercises of the department during the commencement week. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limit so as to bring the advantages of a thoro 
business education within the reach of all. 

Rooms heated and furnished may be secured at the institution at 
from 60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $3.50 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for $5.00 to $6.00 a week. 

TUITION 
Graduate Accountant Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 105 

By the week 2.00 

Gymnasium Fee, Fall term, $3.00; Fall term, $4.00. 
Stenographic Course. 

Fall term, 16 weeks $30.00 

Spring term, 20 weeks 35.00 

School year, 36 weeks 60.00 

By the week 2.00 

Gymnasium Fee, Fall term, $3.00; Fall term, $4.00. 

Tuition for students not taking the regular course. 

Minimum charge $ 5.00 

One hour per day, Fall term 7.00 

One hour per day, Spring term 8.50 

Two hours per day, Fall term 12.00 

Two hours per day, Spring term 14.00 

Three or more hours per day, full term tuition. 

The charges for diplomas are as follows: 

Graduate Accountant $ 5.00 

Graduate Stenographer 5.00 

Stenographic Course 1.00 

Certificate upon completion of Graduate Accountant course with- 
out degree 1.00 

Library Fee. 
An annual Library fee of One Dollar is charged all students in this 
department. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 
This department stands in the closest relationship with the other 
departments of Augustana College and Theological Seminary, and 
students in the Commercial Department may pursue any one study 
in the Academic or Normal Departments, either as visitors or as reg- 
ular members, without extra charge. This intimate connection cannot 
but act favorably upon all who take the business course, as it spurs 
them on to greater efforts, and broadens their views, by reminding 
them that all is not contained in the debits and credits of an account. 
Furthermore, a business man needs the ease and grace that come from 
contact with others; and this intermingling of a large number of well 
informed, zealous students, having various tastes and ambitions, and 
representing all parts of the United States, cannot but have much of 
the desired effect. Among the numerous socities at the College may 
be mentioned the Phrenokosmian and the Adelphic. 

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 
Instruction being largely individual, students may enter at any time 
during the school year. All applications for admission, or requests 
for further information, should be addressed to the President of the 
institution. 



106 GENERAL INFORMATION 



General Information 



GOVERNMENT 

Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned, supported, 
and controlled by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod. Its 
governing body is a Board of Directors, composed of the President of 
the Synod, the President of the Institution, and sixteen members — 
eight ministers and eight laymen, elected by the Synod for a term of 
four years. The meetings of the Board are held at the institution. 

FACULTIES 

All matters pertaining to the institution as a whole which do not 
come under the jurisdiction of the Board of Directors or the President 
are in the hands of the General Faculty, which is composed of all the 
permanent professors of the institution. 

There are four Special Faculties in charge of the following depart- 
ments respectively: The Theological Seminary; the Collegiate, Aca- 
demic, and the Normal Departments; the Conservatory of Music and 
School of Art; the Commercial Department. 

The president of the institution is ex officio chairman of each faculty. 

DIVISION OF THE SCHOOL YEAR 

The school year of thirty-six weeks is divided into two terms: the 
Fall term, embracing a period of sixteen weeks (September — Decem- 
ber), and the Spring term, embracing a period of twenty weeks (Jan- 
uary — May). 

PUBLIC WORSHIP 

Chapel services, which all students are required to attend, are held 
in the chapel every school-day morning. All students are expected to 
attend divine services on Sunday. General and class prayer -meetings 
are held each week by the students. 

REGULATIONS 

There are but few specific rules of government, as each student is 
expected to be exemplary in manners and morals, and to deport himself 
as becomes a student of a Christian institution. 

The attendance of such students only is desired as will make faithful 
use of the educational opportunities afforded. 

Intemperance, profanity, theater-going, playing at cards and billiards, 
and whatever hinders the highest mental, moral, and religious culture, 



GENERAL INFORMATION 107 

or violates the courtesy due to instructors or fellow students, are 
prohibited. 

EXPENSES 

The necessary expenses are exceedingly low. Each item is reduced 
to the very lowest limit, so as to bring the advantages of an education 
within the reach of all. The total necessary expenses for the entire 
school year range from $250 to $300. 

On application, heated and furnished rooms may be secured at from 
60 cents to $1.20 per week. 

Board may be had at the dining hall for $3.50 a week, or in private 
families with furnished rooms for from $5 to $6. 

All payments must be made in advance, and no money is refunded 
for unused tuition. 

A Matriculation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Academic, and Normal departments. 

A Graduation Fee of $5 is charged in the Theological, Collegiate, 
Normal, and Music departments, also in the Commercial Department 
for degree of Graduate Accountant and Graduate Stenographer; for 
certificate without degree, $1.00. 

The Gymnasium Fee, $3.00 for the Fall term, and $4.00 for the Spring 
term, is required of all students in the Collegiate, Academic, and Com- 
mercial departments. This fee entitles students to admission to all 
varsity events, and includes use of swimming-pool. 

TUITION 

The tuition Fee in the various departments is as follows: 
Theological Seminary No tuition. 

Collegiate Department. . . .f FaI1 term * 20 - 00 

| Spring term 25.00 

Academic Department. .. .i Fa11 term 16 - 00 

j Spring term 20.00 

Preparatory Department. .i Fa11 term 16 - 00 

| Spring term 20.00 

fFall term 30.00 

Commercial Department. J Spring term 35.00 

[Per year 60.00 

A Library Fee is charged as follows 

Academy, per term 1.00 

College and Seminary, per term 2.00 

Commercial Department, annual fee 1.00 

Conservatory (optional), per term 1.00 

Laboratory fees are charged as follows: 



108 GENERAL INFORMATION 

Biology. 

Course 4 (Botany) $2.00 

Course 7 (Zoology) 2.00 

Course 8 (Physiology) 2.00 

Course 11 (Zoology 3.00 

Course 12 (Zoology 3.00 

Course 21 (Botany) 3.00 

Course 22 (Botany) 3.00 

Chemistry. 

Course 9 3.00 

Course 10 . ., 3.00 

Course 11 3.00 

Course 12 3.00 

Course 13 3.00 

Course 14 3.00 

Course 21 3.00 

Course 22 3.00 

Course 23 3.00 

Course 24 3.00 

Geology. 

Course 22 2.00 

Physics. 

Course 7 2.00 

Course 8 2.00 

Course 21 3.00 

Course 22 3.00 

For single subjects the following charges are made: 

(Fall term, per hour $1.00 

In the Academy | gpring term) per hour L25 

(Fall term, per hour 2.00 

In the College {spring term, per hour 2.50 

If a student enrolled in the Academy take eight hours or more of 
College studies, he shall pay college tuition. 

LADIES' HALL. 

For the accomodation of lady students who prefer a home under the 
immediate auspices of the institution, a Ladies' Hall has been estab- 
lished. The rooms are carpeted, furnished, lighted, and heated, but 
each occupent is expected to provide herself with combs, toilet soap, 
towels, sheets, pillow cases, counterpane, blankets or a heavy com- 
forter, and curtains. The hall is under the supervision of Mrs. Olive 
Rydholm as Principal. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 109 

LIBRARY AND READING ROOM 

MISS MAMIE JOHNSON, ACTING LIBRARIAN 

History. For many years the library occupied a single large room 
on the third floor of the main building of the institution. A portion 
of this room, divided off from the rest by a railing, and fitted up with 
tables and chairs, served as a reading room, while the rest was fitted 
up with wooden stacks for the storing of books. This arrangement 
served its purpose admirably for a number of years until the gradually 
accumulating collections made it more and more evident that the 
library was in sore need of larger and more adequate accommodations. 
In the opportune time this need was satisfied in a manner so fitting 
and beautiful as to exceed even the fondest dreams of those most 
interested in the literary collections of the institution. In the year 
1909 it was announced that the Denkmann family, for a long time close 
friends of the instiution and of the principles upon which it is founded, 
had decided to erect upon the campus a library building costing not less 
than $100,000 as a fitting memorial to the memory of their parents and 
a gift to Augustana College and Theological Seminary. Work was 
begun upon the foundation almost immediately, and in the spring of 
1911 the building was completed at a total cost of about $208,000. In 
May of the same year, by the aid of the students and teaching force 
of the institution, the books were transferred from the old home to the 
new, and are now stored on the shelves of the magnificent building. 

Building. The building is a modernized version of the Italian renais- 
sance. It is built of the best quality of Missouri limestone, rests on 
a massive foundation of concrete, and is surmounted by a high tile 
roof. It is 120 feet long and 96 feet deep, and the major part of the 
building has three floors. The predominent characteristic in the plan 
of architecture, both as to the interior and the exterior, is that of 
massiveness. In addition to its architectural beauty the interior of 
the building possesses the advantage of very practical arrangement. 

The first floor contains the Memorial Hall, with Mosaic floor and 
walls lined with huge slabs of Italian marble; a lecture room with a 
seating capacity of about 150, and fitted with raised floor and all 
modern appliances for illustrated scientific lectures, etc., and the 
administrative offices of the institution. From either side of the 
Memorial Hall large marble staircases lead to the second floor, on 
which are found the reading room, librarian's offices, etc. 

The reading room, extending the full length of the building, is pro- 
nounced one of the most beautiful and comfortable rooms of its kind 
in the country. The tables and other furnishings are in quartersawed 
oak and provide a seating capacity of about 200, while the shelving 
about the walls accomodates about 300 current periodicals and some 
3,000 reference volumes. Fronting each entrance is a large catalog 
case, and above the rectangle formed by the catalog cases, the loan 



110 GENEEAL INFOBMATION 

desk, and the doors leading to the offices and stacks, is a beautiful 
art-glass dome which receives its light from a skylight. The museum, 
just above the reading room, is fitted up with wall cases and floor 
cases for the preservation of collections, and this room receives its 
light from a row of skylights. 

The rear part of the building contains a basement which has the 
unpacking room, seven private study seminars, and rest rooms for 
ladies and men. The rest room for ladies has also a small room annexed 
which serves as a kitchen for those students who, because of distance, 
are prevented from taking lunch at home. Above the basement is 
the stack shaft providing room for four mezzanines, three of which 
are put in. The stacks are of Art Metal steel construction, and the 
mezzanines have glass floors. Above this shaft store rooms are 
provided for newspaper collections, etc. A portion of the first floor 
stacks is at present partitioned off and used as an alumni room. Here 
are kept the pictures, etc., of the various graduating classes. 

The building is equipped with the latest and most up-to-date heating, 
lighting, ventilating, and cleaning appliances. 

Collections. Starting with a nucleus of 5,000 volumes, chiefly his- 
torical works, presented to the library in 1882 by Charles XV, then 
king of Sweden, the library now possesses 26,129 volumes and 23,705 
pamphlets, the latter being chiefly scientific publications received in 
exchange for the Augustana Library Publications, of which eight have, 
thus far been published. It has a special collection of books on missions 
which is constantly being increased thru the efforts of the Augustana 
Students' Foreign Mission Society. There is also connected with the 
library a collection of files of Swedish-American newspapers and other 
periodicals which is said to be one of the largest of its kind in the world. 
The library receives currently over 200 periodicals including local and 
Chicago newspapers, general and departmental American and foreign 
periodicals, all the more prominent Swedish-American newspapers, and 
many college publications. 

Provisions for growth. The growth of the library has been due 
largely to the generosity of friends. This is especially true of the 
many current periodicals which are regularly filed away. A permanent 
book fund is now made possible by the fact that the library fee, paid 
by the students and other users of the library, is used exclusively for 
the purchase of books. Further gifts have from time to time come to 
the library from the Denkmann family. During the last year there 
have been added to the library by purchase and gift 1,846 volumes 
and 1,778 pamphlets. 
The list of donors for the last year up to April 1, 1918 is as follows: 

American Red Cross 3 

Andreen, Gustav 12 

Augustana Book Concern 19 

Augustana College , 1 



GENERAL INFORMATION 111 

Augustana College — Class of 1917 4 

Bernhardi, Dr ,. . 318 

Boyd, Jackson 1 

Broughton, Urban H 2 

Carnegie endowment for international peace 1 

Casto, J. W , 1 

Cervin, Olof 14 

Challman, S. A 1 

Church peace union , 2 

Committee on public information 5 

Conn, agricultural exp. station 1 

Cook & Co., pub 2 

Cooksey Publishing Co , 3 

Cox, H. R 82 

Cumulative digest corporation , 2 

Dahl, K. G. Wm 2 

Davenport Commercial Club 1 

Dennison manufacturing Co , 4 

Doubleday, Page & Co 1 

Ekman, G. A 127 

Fuller, H. J 1 

General Council Publication House , 4 

General Education Board 1 

General Synod 1 

Graham, W. J , 2 

Granere, C. 271 

Gridley, Albert L , 1 

Grolier Society 1 

Gruber, L. Franklin , 2 

Guaranty Trust Co 11 

Harvard museum 1 

Hedstrom, A. R 1 

Herbert, G. A 1 

Illinois 11 

Illinois Christian Missionary Society 1 

Illinois University 3 

Iowa 2 

Iowa Academy of Science 1 

Kahn, Otto H 2 

Kempe, Andrew 1 

Kling, L. W , 1 

Lake Forest University 1 

Lange, Paulus 1 

Lansing, Mrs. Abraham 2 

Laurence, A. Oliver , 1 



112 GENERAL INFORMATION 

Library of Congress 3 

Lindell, L. E 124 

Lundgren, Mrs. Gertrude 

Lundquist, C. O , 

MacMillan Co 

Michigan Historical Commission 

Minnesota Historical Society 

Mittineague Paper Co , 

National Lumber Manufacturers Association 

National Security League 

National Wholesale Liquor Dealers' Association 

Nebraska State Historical Society 

Nelson, Lars P , 

New Jersey Geological Survey , 

New York , , 

N. Y. Education Department , 

N. Y. State Board of Charities 

N. Y. State University 

Olson, Axel B , 

Olson, Gideon 

Olson, Harry , 

Olsson, Anna 

Persson, Paulina , 

Princell, Mrs. J 

Revell, Fleming H. & Co 

Rockefeller, John D., Jr 

Sampson, Alden , 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

Skarstedt, Marcus 

Smithsonian Institute 16 

Strong, Augustus H. 

Susquehanna Synod 

Swedish Engineers' Society of Chicago 

Udden, Anton D 

U. S. Brewers' Association 

U. S. Government 2 

Unknown givers . .. 2 

Wallin, Ivan E > 

Wartburg Publishing House 

"West Chicago Park Commissioners 

Woman's Peace Party 

Y. M. C. A. Association Press 

Yale University 

Youngert, S. G 



GENERAL INFORMATION 113 

Classification, etc. The revised Dewey Decimal Classification is used 
for all the books, except that a special classification of religion is used 
for the books on religion. A dictionary card catalog is being made 
which enters all books in a single alphabet by author, title, and sub- 
ject or subjects. All current periodicals, all files of bound magazines 
of general interest, and several hundred general reference volumes 
are kept on the reading room shelves where they may be consulted 
without formality. An assorted collection of books on religion is also 
kept in the reading room. 

Use. The use of the library is open to anyone upon payment of 
the library fee. Books may be drawn for a period of two weeks with 
the privilege of renewal if necessary, and the library arrangements 
are such that students may do reference work under most favorable 
conditions. All books belonging to the library are kept in the library 
building, but generous arrangements are made with the several de- 
partments as regards reference books for laboratory use. The library 
and reading room are open every weekday from 7:45 a. m. to 9 p. m., 
except on Saturday, when they close at 6 p. m. The use of the library 
is subject to the rules, a copy of which may be had at the loan desk. 

Students of the institution have access also to the excellent city 
libraries of Rock Island, Moline, and Davenport. 



THE MUSEUM 

MISS MAMIE JOHNSON, CURATOR. 

The natural history collections formerly housed on the upper floor 
of the main building are now permanently located in the museum 
room of the Denkmann Memorial Library building. Ample space and 
opportunity are here given for the proper display of the collections. 

All of the various departments of natural history are quite well 
represented. Especially is this true of the geological department with 
its thousands of fossil and mineralogical specimens, and zoological 
department containing hundreds of well preserved specimens of mam- 
mals, birds, reptiles, and fishes. 

The museum also contains valuable ethnographical collections from 
many parts of the world; a numismatic collection of over 1,200 repre- 
sentative coins and medals besides a large number of rare and valu- 
able notes and paper money; an excellent stamp collection; and a col- 
lection of rare and interesting books and manuscripts. 

It has many miscellaneous articles and specimens of particular 
interest. 

The museum has during the year been the recipient of gifts from 
Grant Hultberg, Andrew Kempe, and Rev. J. E. Swanbom. 

There are no regular museum hours, but those desiring to examine 
the collections may gain permission to do so by applying to the curator. 

College Catalog. 8. 



114 GENERAL INFORMATION 

DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 

This department occupies the rooms on the third floor of the main 
college building, which were formerly used for library and museum. 
During the summer of 1911 these rooms were entirely remodeled and 
converted into laboratory and recitation rooms for the department of 
Biology and Geology. There are in all four rooms. On the south side 
is the spacious lecture room, the west portion of which is used for 
laboratory work in Botany and Zoology. Adjoining this room to the 
east is a smaller room, fitted with an aquarium, also with screen and 
lanterns for microscopic and stereoptic projection. Facing the north 
is a laboratory for advanced work. The north and south rooms are 
separated by a hall, at the rear of which is the private room of the 
instructors. The laboratories are provided with necessary equipment, 
including apparatus and instruments, preserved materials, models and 
charts for biological work, also minerals, rocks, chemicals and maps for 
the geological department. The equipment is added to year by year. 

THE LABORATORY OF PHYSICS AND CHEMISTRY 

The departments of physics and chemistry are at present housed 
in Ericson Hall, a two-story brick structure situated north of the main 
buildings. The first floor is devoted to physics and contains a lecture 
room seating twenty-five students, and a physics laboratory provided 
with work tables for about the same number of students working at 
one time. The apparatus cases are stocked for lecture demonstrations 
and individual laboratory work in elementary and advanced physics. 

The chemical department occupies the second floor which consists 
of a lecture room seating twenty-five students, a laboratory for ele- 
mentary and advanced work, a balance room, and store room. The 
laboratory has work tables for forty students working at one time and 
is supplied with gas, electric current, draft hoods, etc. A room in the 
basement has been fitted up for work in assaying, metallurgy and shop 
work. 

THE HISTORICAL COLLECTIONS AND THE ARCHIVES 

PROF. C. W. FOSS, GUARDIAN AND ARCHIVIST 

Ethnographical and Numismatic 

The Ethnological Collection contains numerous and valuable speci- 
mens from India, China, Africa, Palestine and Persia; relics of the late 
war; and implements, weapons, amulets, and personal ornaments of 
the American Indians. 

The Numismatic Collection consists of numerous specimens of gold, 
silver, copper, and bronze coins, together with medals and tokens. 
There is also a large collection of postage and revenue stamps, old 
paper money, fractional currency, foreign and Confederate notes, and 
continental and colonial paper money. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 115 

Historical 
The Historical Collection of American Lutheran and Scandinavian 
American Literature has been steadily growing during the year. Com- 
plete and nearly complete files of the leading American Lutheran 
periodicals (English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, 
and Finnish) have been secured and carefully arranged, also files of 
most of the Swedish-American periodicals. 

Contributions to this collection are kindly solicited. Books, period- 
icals, pamphlets, catalogs, minutes of synods and conferences, and 
whatever pertains to the history of the Lutheran Church in America 
or to the history of the Scandinavians in this country will be thank- 
fully received. 

There are now something over six hundred different papers and 
periodicals in the Swedish-American and American Lutheran collec- 
tions taken together. These papers are all arranged in volumes and 
filed away in suitable cases and cataloged so that any one wishing to 
consult some particular number of any periodical can do so at a 
moment's notice by applying to the Archivist. 

There are also large collections of duplicates. Parties wishing to 
complete their files may secure them either by purchase or by fair 
exchange. 

An interesting collection is that of the local church papers or young 
people's papers. But this collection is not nearly complete. It is hoped 
that pastors and young people's societies will kindly send in their 
papers, if possible from the first issue. Large numbers of them have 
been received during the present year. 

For contributions to this department our thanks are due to the fol- 
lowing persons: Dr. C. E. Lindberg, Augustana Theological Seminary; 
Augustana missionaries in China; Rev. F. A. Johnsson, Galesburg, 111.; 
Karl P. Silberg, Ironwood, Mich. ; Augustana Book Concern, Rock Island, 
111. ; Secretaries of various Lutheran Synods and Conferences, Lutheran 
Colleges, Seminaries, Academies, Orphan Homes, Hospitals, etc.; Pub- 
lishers of newspapers and periodicals, as the following: Augustana, 
Svenska Tribunen-Nyheter, Svenska Amerikanaren, Kuriren, Monitoren, 
Omaha Posten, Vart Land, Skandinavia, Iowa Posten, Svenska Ameri- 
kanska Vastern, Nordstjernan, Minnesota Stats Tidning, Svenska Fol- 
kets Tidning, Svenska Amerikanska Posten, Sandebudet, Chicago- 
Bladet, Svea, Utah-Posten, Medborgaren, Missions-Vannen, Svenska 
Amerikanska Tribunen, Nya Veckoposten, Finska Amerikanaren, 
Skandia, Svenska Socialisten, Lindsborgs-Posten, Lindsborg News, 
Marinette Tribunen, Svenska Posten, Arbetaren, Texas Posten, Svenska 
Nyheter, Svenska Nordvastern, California Veckoblad, Duluth Posten, 
Musik Tidning, For Svenska Hem, The Lutheran Herald, The Lutheran, 
The United Lutheran, The Lutheran Companion, The Lutheran Stand- 
ard, The Lutheran Church Work, The Lutheran Mission Worker, 



116 GENEBAL INFORMATION" 

Young Folks, Foreign Missionary, American Lutheran Survey, Lutheran 
Church Visitor, Der Lutheraner, Lehre und Wehre, Kirchenblatt, 
Kirchen-Zeitung, Missions-Bote, Missions-Taube, Kinder und Jugend- 
blatt, Kirchliche Zeitschrift, Danskeren, Ev. Luth. Kirketidende, Lu- 
theraneren, Amerikan Suometar, and others. 

Contributions to these collections should be sent to the Guardian of 
the Historical Collection, Prof. C. W. Foss, Rock Island, 111. 

THE AUGUSTANA OBSERVER 
The Augustana Observer is a self-supporting monthly paper published 
by the Lyceum. It aims to reflect the sentiments and the ideals of 
the student body, strengthen the bonds of comradeship between the 
students, and also to keep the alumni and the friends of Augustana in 
touch with the life and work of the institution. The editorial staff is 
elected annually from the active members of the Phrenokosmian and 
the Adelphic literary societies. 

The subscription price is one dollar per annum, single copies 15 cents. 
Sample copies may be had on application. 
The following are the members of the staff for the year 1918: 

Simon Fagerstrom, '19 Editor in Chief 

Elmer Friedlund Business Manager 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

Dr. E. F. Bartholomew Faculty 

Fae Hanna, '19 , General News 

Gertrude Carlson, '20 Organizations 

LeRoy Carlson Musical Notes 

Gideon Ahnquist Theological Seminary 

L. E. Jones, '15 , Alumni 

Eric Wahlstrom, '20 Exchanges 

Robert Olmsted, '20 Athletics 

Enoch Sanden, '20 Observatory 

THE STUDENTS' UNION 
The students' union of Augustana College and Theological Seminary 
was organized Nov. 5, 1892, for the purpose of uniting the students of 
the institution into one body. A student enrolled in any department, 
and who pays the assessment levied, is a member of the organization. 
Business of general interest to the student body is transacted. The 
annual meeting is held the third Tuesday in May. Special meetings 
are held whenever the occasions require it. 

OFFICERS 

President, Carl A. Swanson. 
Vice president, Perle Crone. 
Secretary, Edna E. Curry. 
Treasurer, Paulus Lange. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 117 

THE AUGUSTANA FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY 

Organized by students in 1886 and incorporated in 1895, this society 
has had a steady growth, and is now strong numerically, numbering 
among its members not only students but also professors of the insti- 
tution and ministers and laymen of the Synod. 

Its aim is to arouse and maintain, especially among the students, a 
lively interest in the extension of God's kingdom in heathen lands, and, 
by means of membership fees, contributions, etc., to render pecuniary 
aid to the Synod in its foreign mission work. 

At the institution the society furnishes mission literature, arranges 
lectures and conducts mission study classes, one large class which 
meets Sunday afternoon, and several smaller classes which meet some 
hour during the week. Members of the society also visit congregations 
and conduct services in the interest of the mission cause. 

Every member who has paid $10 in membership fees becomes a life 
member. 

This year $500 will be donated to the General Council's mission in 
India and $200 to its mission in Porto Rico, $500 to the Augustana 
Synod's mission in China and $500 to the new mission in the Soudan, 
Africa, about to be started. 

The officers are: John Benson, president; August P. Lawrence, vice 
president; John A. Martin, secretary; Dr. Carl A. Blomgren, treasurer. 
The treasurer's address is 825 — 35th St., Rock Island, 111. 

THE PHRENOKOSMIAN SOCIETY 
This is the oldest society at the institution and was organized in 
1860 in Chicago, 111., where the institution was then located. Its object 
is to further the literary improvement and intellectual development 
of its members. The meetings, which are held on Wednesday p. m. of 
each week, begin with devotional exercises. The programs, consisting 
of essays, debates, orations, declamations, music, criticism, etc., are 
interesting and instructive. A weekly paper, The Phrenokosmiana, is 
published by the society, and read at every regular meeting. Students 
from any department of the institution may become members of the 
society, and upon leaving the school they become honorary members. 
The Phreno Orchestra, which has taken active part in the work of the 
society for a number of years, has been reorganized. Music by this 
organization forms an important part in nearly every program. 

THE ADELPHIC SOCIETY 
This is the younger of the two prominent literary societies of the 
institution. It was organized in 1883, and incorporated in 1884. The 
society holds its meetings on Wednesday p. m. of each week. The exer- 
cises are conducted in the English language and consist of essays, 
orations, declamations, music, etc. These exercises aim to supplement 



118 GENERAL INFORMATION 

the class-room work by promoting culture and fostering a fraternal 
spirit among its members. The various officers are selected each month, 
thus affording all an opportunity for practise in conducting public 
meetings. The society also publishes a paper, The Censor, containing 
articles on subjects of general interest, college news, etc. All students 
of the institution are eligible to membership in the society. 

The Adelphic Orchestra, organized for the purpose of filling a long- 
felt need within the society, not only takes an active part in the regular 
programs of the society, but plays a prominent role in college activities 
in general. 

The Adelphic Society is a charter member of the Illinois Intercol- 
legiate Association of Literary Societies, composed of literary societies 
representing the universities as well as the most prominent colleges 
in Illinois. 

A joint reception is given by the Adelphic and Phrenokosmian 
societies at the beginning of each school term. The chief object of 
this reception is to furnish an opportunity for new students to become 
acquainted with the rest of the school-family as soon as possible. 

THE CONCORDIA SOCIETY 

This society was organized February 4, 1898, by students of the 
Theological Seminary. The aim of the society is the promotion of 
Evangelical Lutheran Theological culture, and the strengthening of 
Evangelical Lutheran faith. 

Every student of the Theological Seminary is a member. The society 
has met, during the school year, every other Wednesday afternoon, 
when programs, consisting of discussions, or lectures by specially in- 
vited speakers and members of the society, have been rendered. 

THE LYCEUM 
The Lyceum is composed of the three leading literary societies of 
the institution, namely: the Phrenokosmian, the Adelphic, and the 
Concordia. Its general object is to promote the literary interests of 
the institution. The Lyceum publishes "The Augustana Observer." 
During the school-year a lecture course of nine numbers has been 
successfully carried out. 

SVENSKA VITTERHETSSaLLSKAPET 
This society was organized in the fall of the year 1896 for the study 
of Swedish literature and culture. Its membership is limited to eigh- 
teen, and unanimity is required for election. The society meets once 
a month for literary discussions, reading of essays, criticism, and 
original productions. 

TEGNfiR-FoRBUNDET 
This society was organized April 4, 1901, for the study of Swedish 
literature. Only those students who have a good knowledge of Swedish 



GENEBAL INFORMATION 119 

and show interest in the language and literature of Sweden are eligible 
to membership. Meetings are held twice a month. The society pub- 
lishes a monthly, Tomten. 

IDUNA 
The Iduna Society was organized by the members of the Second 
Class Academy, November 21, 1902. The purpose of the society is to 
promote the use of the Swedish language among the younger students. 
All students are eligible to membership. Meetings are held once a 
week. The society publishes a monthly called Iduna. 

OLOV RUDBECK 

This society was organized April 4, 1910, for the study of Swedish 
literature, art and culture. Its membership is limited to twelve, and 
unanimity is required for election. Only students who have a good 
knowledge of Swedish and show interest in the language and literature 
of Sweden are eligible. 

The society meets twice a month. Its studies are conducted in the 
manner of a Seminar class under the direction of the professor of the 
Swedish language and literature. 

DEBATING CLUBS 

Besides the above named literary societies, there are the five follow- 
ing debating clubs: 

The Gladstone Debating Club, organized 1893. The membership is 
limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Webster Debating Club, organized in 1902. The membership is 
limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Torgny Debating Club, organized in the fall of 1904. This is a 
Swedish debating club. The membership is limited to eighteen. Week- 
ly meetings are held. 

The Balfour Debating Club, organized in 1905. The membership is 
limited to eighteen. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Edward Everett Debating Club, organized in 1913. The mem- 
bership is limited to twenty-four. Weekly meetings are held. 

The Lincoln Debating Club, organized in 1913. This is an Academj 
debating club. The membership is limited to twenty. Weekly meetings 
are held. 

THE BOARD OF CONTROL OF FORENSICS 

The Board of Control of Forensics, established by the Board of Direc- 
tors upon petition of the Debating League during the year 1915, has 
charge of all matters pertaining to intercollegiate and interclub debates. 

Membership of the Board is made up of the President and Treasurer 
of the institution, one member of the Board of Directors, two members 
of the general faculty, and four student members, nominated by the 
several debating clubs and elected by the Debating League. During 



120 GENEEAL INFORMATION 

the past year the following have served on this Board: Dr. G. A. 
Andreen and Prof. A. Kempe, ex officio members; Rev. A. P. Bergstrom, 
representing the Board of Directors; Dr. E. F. Bartholomew and Dr. 
C. W. Foss, representing the general faculty; Blanche Searle (Edward 
Everett), James Fitzpatrick (Gladstone), John Elson (Balfour), Simon 
Fagerstrom (Webster), representing the Debating League. 

OFFICERS 

President, Dr. G. A. Andreen. 
Secretary, Blanche Searle. 
Treasurer, Prof. A. Kempe. 

AUGUSTANA DEBATING LEAGUE 
The Debating League consists of the Webster, Balfour, Gladstone 
and Edward Everett debating clubs. It is an advisory body to the 
Debating Board of Control. 

DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING 
Roy Monroe Conrad, B.S., 

DIRECTOR OF GYMNASTICS AND ATHLETICS 

For the physical training and development of students there is pro- 
vided an excellent equipped gymnasium. The gymnasium has just 
recently been constructed and is one of the best in the state. It is well 
heated, lighted and ventilated. The first floor is the gymnasium proper 
and is well equipped with the latest improved apparatus. Above this 
we have the spectators' gallery and running track. The running track 
is cork covered, eight feet wide, and requires only fourteen and a half 
laps to the mile. 

The basement is equipped with locker rooms and shower baths for 
both girls and boys. Here also is found the swimming pool, which is 
the best of its kind, being sixty feet long and twenty-five feet wide. 

In this building a systematic course of training is pursued, the aim 
of which is to train the student so that every part of the physical being 
may be well developed. The exercises that are given are of such a 
character that all are able to do them. They are as follows: marching, 
maze running, free hand calisthenics, dum bell work, floor work, light 
apparatus work and games. 

Careful attention is given to the physical condition of the students 
and no one is allowed to engage in any excessive exercise or to attempt 
anything which is likely to be attended with risk. Before entering 
any of the classes each student is required to undergo a physical ex- 
amination by a competent physician. 

For outdoor athletics, Ericson field furnishes ample room. On other 
parts of the campus are found tennis courts. 

To meet the requirements in physical training students are required 



GENERAL INFORMATION 121 

to take at least two hours' prescribed exercise per week under the 
direction of the instructor, for which credit will be given. 

THE AUGUSTANA ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

As a result of a resolution adopted by the Synod at its meeting in 
Rock Island in June, 1910, inter-collegiate athletic relations have been 
resumed at Augustana College. All inter-collegiate games and contests 
are under the direction of a Board of Control, whose duty it is to 
arrange schedules for games and to enforce the eligibility rules of the 
institution. 

AUGUSTANA PROHIBITION LEAGUE 

This league was organized February 13, 1911, to promote broad and 
practical study of the liquor problem and related social and political 
questions, to advance the principles of prohibition and secure the en- 
listment of students for service and leadership in the overthrow of the 
liquor traffic. This organization is affiliated with the Inter-collegiate 
Prohibition Association but has no connection with any political party. 
It provides several temperance programs during the year and holds a 
local oratorical contest annually, the winner of this contest represening 
Augustana in the State contest. Any student is eligible to membership. 

OFFICERS 

President, Julius Johnson. 
Vice President, James Pitzpatrick. 
Secretary, Florence Anderson. 
Treasurer, Henning Hassel. 
Reporter, Harry Anderson. 

THE LUTHER BIBLE SOCIETY 

The Luther Bible Society was organized in 1913 for the study of the 
Bible. The membership is limited to eighteen and unanimity is re- 
quired for election. Only students who show that they are interested 
in Bible study are eligible for membership. The society meets every 
Sunday evening at 6 o'clock. The studies are conducted under the 
leadership of the members, each leading in turn. At frequent intervals 
the society endeavors to hold lectures on different phases of Bible 
study, at which times the meetings are open to all. The aim of the 
society is to make its members more interested in Bible study and to 
make them more familiar with the Bible. The organization has during 
the past year been very active. Its officers are: 

J. David Ekstrom, President. 
Paulus Lange, Vice President. 
Reuben Kron, Sec'y-Treas. 



122 GENERAL INFORMATION 

AUGUSTANA COLLEGE BAND 

This band was organized in 1874. Students and others who are 
proficient on some band instrument are admitted upon application as 
members. Applications are made to the director, and upon recom- 
mendation candidates are admitted by a two-thirds vote of the band. 
Rehearsals are held every Wednesday afternoon from 4:30 to 6 o'clock 
and every Friday afternoon from 4 to 6, under the direction of Director 
Vergilius Ferm. 

OFFICERS 

Director — Vergilius Ferm, A.B. 
President — Hugo Larson. 
Vice President — Roland Sala. 
Secretary — Fred Freytag. 
Treasurer — Lowell Kay. 
Librarian — Luther Kron. 

ROSTER 

Cornets — Vergilius Ferm, Palmer Nestander, Paul Warnock, Karl Swan- 
berg, Arthur Olson, C. W. Wiberg. 
Trombones — Rex VanAlstyne, Richard VanAlstyne. 
Baritone — Roland Sala, Harry Taylor. 
E-Flat Bass — Lowell Kay, Ernest Lack. 
BB-Flat Bass — A. Bernstein. 

B-Flat Clarinets — Luther Kron, Frank Sampson, Luther Anderson. 
E-Flat Clarinet — Fred Freytag. 
Piccolo — John Leaf. 

Altos — Hugo Larson, John Dahlgren, Thure Fagerstrom, Martin Collins. 
Drums — Herman Schneyer, Reuben Kron. 

THE AUGUSTANA ORCHESTRA 

The object of this organization is to study standard works of the 
older as well as of the more modern composers, giving players who 
possess sufficient command of some orchestral instrument excellent 
opportunities for ensemble practise. Among the more important num- 
bers in the repertoire of the orchestra are the following: 

Symphonies: Haydn's Military and London; Mozart's Jupiter; and 
Beethoven's C major and D major. 

Overtures: Schubert's Rosamunde; Mozart's Die Entfiihrung; Her- 
old's Zampa; Suppe's Poet and Peasant; Rossini's Barber of Seville; 
Nicolai's Merry Wives of Windsor, and Festival Overture. 

Oratorios: Handel's Messiah and Haydn's Creation. 

Advanced students in the vocal or instrumental departments of the 
institution are given the privilege of singing or playing with the 
orchestra at stated intervals during the year. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 123 

MEMBERS 

Director — Prof. Algert Anker. 

First Violins — Hulda Peterson, Wava Lindstrom, Leone Haywood, Jenny 

Swanquist, Andora Larson, Stowell Musson. 
Second Violins — Eugene Burton, Philip Lecata, Veva Marley, Alexander 

Bernstein. 
Viola — Ludvig Mellander. 
Cellos — Bessie Friestat, Anna Leaf. 
Basses — A. J. Burton, Hjalmar Johnson. 
Flutes — John Leaf, Wilford Eiteman. 
Clarinets — L. W. Kling, Fred Freytag. 
Cornets — Walter Nelson, Vergilius Ferm. 
Horn — Max Giersch. 
Trombone — Clarke Swanson. 
Piano — Ebba Leaf. 
Organ — Mildred Nelson. 

THE AUGUSTANA CHAMBER MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 
The director of the Violin department has organized at the College 
a string quartet, a string trio, and a piano trio for the purpose of 
studying the classic masterpieces in the department of chamber music. 
Only students of some ability and of serious purpose are admitted to 
these organizations. 

THE HANDEL ORATORIO SOCIETY 
In January, 1881, Dr. O. Olsson gathered together at Augustana Col- 
lege the first oratorio society in this section of the Mississippi Valley, 
having as its object the study and rendering of oratorio works. The 
society then organized has continued in existence, in one form or 
another, till the present time. 

From the founding of the oratorio society to the present day the 
following persons have served as leaders of the chorus: Joseph Osborn, 
P. A. Edquist, Jas. Moody, Dr. G. Stolpe, G. E. Griffith, V. Tengwald, 
A. D. Bodfors, F. E. Peterson, Christian Oelschlagel, Emil Larson, Mrs. 
Edla Lund, and J. Victor Bergquist. Following are some of the works 
rendered: Handel's Messiah, Haydn's Creation, Spohr's Last Judge- 
ment, Gaul's Holy City, Gade's Zion, Bach's God's Time is Best, Cowen's 
Song of Thanksgiving, Stolpe's Reformation Cantata, Wennerberg's 
Psalms of David, and Christmas Oratorio, Farmer's Mass, Mendelssohn's 
Elijah, Stainer's Daughter of Jairus, Bennet's Woman of Samaria, 
Coomb's The Vision of St. John, Patton's Isaiah, Bergquist's Golgotha, 
Carl Busch's King Olaf, Dubois' Seven Last Words, etc. 

During the present year one concert has been given, December 14th, 
when Handel's Messiah was given assisted by the church choirs of the 
three cities, Mrs. Geistweit Benedict, soprano, Althea Brown, alto, Adolf 
Engstrom, tenor, Ivar Skougaard, bass, and the College Orchestra. 



124 GENERAL INFORMATION 

OFFICERS 

Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist. 
President, Dr. E. F. Bartholomew. 
Vice President, L. E. Jones. 
Secretary, Gertrude Carlson. 
Librarian, Reuben Kron. 

MEMBERS 

Sopranos — Amy Anderson, Florence Anderson, Bertha Anderson, Mrs. 
A. M. Beaver, Genieve Blair, Irene Carstens, Hilma Carlson, Myrtle 
Cheney, Eunice Christenson, Henrietta Danielson, Ruth Dodson, 
Signa Erickson, Emma Fant, Louise Fivey, Margaret L. Frank, 
Charity Hasch, Esther Haywood, Ruth Hellberg, Gertrude Jacobson, 
Lillian Jensen, Anna F. Johnson, Gertrude Johnson, Dora Johnson, 
Mrs. D. Johnson, Mrs. P. H. Kisacaid, Edith McCulloch, Lucy B. 
Mulligan, Pearl Nelson, Ruth Nelson, Elizabeth Oglivee, Elsie Olson, 
Ruth Ostrom, Ethel Parmele, Hilda Powdrill, Florence Rude, Bertha 
Ramquist, Mrs. Sara Sampson, Lydia Stenborg, Jennie Westphal. 

Altos — Margaret Bently, Nellie Bunning, Grace Bloomberg, Mildred 
Blomgren, Mildred Bowes, Ruth Carlmark, Gertrude Carlson, Mrs. 
W. F. Coleman, Elsie Collins, Pearl Crone, Ida M. Dittman, Helen 
Dodson, Blenche Ehler, Linnea Forsberg, Victoria Gefvert, Lillian 
Gross, Amelia Gruenwald, Inez Gull, Eva Johnson, Stella Johnson, 
Winnifred James, Mrs. C. Johnson, Pauline Korn, Myrtle Larson, 
Ebba Leaf, Freda Mattson, Juvey Nelson, Mildred Nelson, Martha 
Norman, Irene Olson, Ellen Palm, Esthena Randolph, Hazel 
Spaulding, Myrtle Swanson, Myrtle Wessel, Esther Younggren. 

Tenors — C. A. Anderson, R. S. Blakemore, A. E. Bomgren, Ernest 
Carlson, Vernon Erickson, Carl Franzen, Clarence Granlund, Hen- 
ning Hassel, Constant Johnson, Philip Johnson, L. E. Jones, Luther 
Lindstrom, Herbert Nordlander, Robert Olmsted, Arthur Peterson, 
Walter Paterson, Frank Sampson, Harry Taylor, J. Ward Warner, 
Curtis Wiberg. 

Basses — Anton Amenoff, Herbert Anderson, William Berger, Carl Beng- 
ston, John Benson, W. E. Bondinot, C. O. Bostrom, C. A. Boehmer, 
O. W. Bjorkquist, C. George Engdahl, Adolph Fant, W. Z. Fidler, 
Carl Fryxell, John Fryxell, Glenn Fry, Elmer Holt, L. G. Hunt, 
Bernhard Johnson, Victor C. Johnson, Mauritz Johnson, Hjalmar 
Johnson, Oscar Johnson, Emil Johnson, Reuben Kron, Harry Lund- 
berg, Samuel D. Marchant, W. A. McCulloch, Herbert Olander, 
Harry Olson, Gerhard Olson, Nels E. Olson, Hjalmar Olson, E. A. 
Palm, Paul Randolph, Theo. Rydback, Enoch Sanden, W. N. Schroe- 
der, L. A. Schillinger, E. O. Vaile, Jr., Walter K. Voss, Earl R. 
Walker, Hult Wilson. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 125 

THE WENNERBERG MALE CHORUS 
The chorus was organized in 1901 and is the Glee club par excellence 
of the institution. Its primary object is the promotion of high-class 
male chorus singing, the repertoire consisting of selections from stand- 
ard Swedish, English and American composers. The chorus has during 
its last few years made annual concert tours thruout the central part 
of the Synod's territory. Last year the chorus made an extended tour 
thru the eastern states. This year the chorus toured Iowa, Illinois, 
and Nebraska. 

OFFICERS 

Director, Prof. J. Victor Bergquist. 
President, Herbert Nordlander. 
Vice President, Carl Swanson. 
Recording Secretary, Paul Randolph. 
Treasurer, Wilbur Palmquist. 
Manager, Andrew Kempe. 
Curator, Hult Wilson. 
Accompanist, Hulda Peterson. 
Historian, Otto Bostrom. 

MEMBERS 

First Tenors — Herbert Nordlander, Carl Swanson, Carl Sodergren, 

Rudolph Swanson, Oscar Dahlquist, Clarence Granlund. 
Second Tenors — Vergilius Ferm, Vernon Erickson, Walter Peterson, 

Constant Johnson. 
First Basses — Hjalmar Olson, Nels Olson, Theodore Rydback, Hult 

Wilson. 
Second Basses — Paul Randolph, Otto Bostrom, Maurice Johnson, Enoch 
Sanden, Wilbur Palmquist, Herbert Olander. 
First Tenor understudy: Evald Palmer. 
Second Tenor understudy: Curtis Wiberg. 
First Bass understudy: Carl Fryxell. 
Second Bass understudy: W. R. Berg. 

THE CLEF CLUB 
The Clef Club is a musical organization, which is made up largely 
of Conservatory students. It was organized in 1913 and since then it 
has had a rapid growth. Programs are given every Friday afternoon 
at 4 p. m. at the College Chapel to which the public is invited. The 
Clef Club has brought many local and visiting artists. These musical 
hours on Friday afternoon are of inestimable value to the whole student 
body, an hour of aesthetic recreation. 

OFFICERS 

President, Esther Peterson. 
Vice President, LeRoy Carlson. 
Secrtary and Treasurer, Mildred Nelson. 



126 GENERAL INFORMATION 

THE ORIOLE CLUB 
The Oriole Club, now in its third year, is a ladies' chorus of high 
excellence. It was organized under the direction of Arvid Samuelson, 
and its purpose has been primarily to raise funds for the new pipe 
organ at Augustana College. During Easter vacation of this year a 
tour was made thru Iowa and Illinois. 

OFFICERS 

Director and Manager, Arvid Samuelson. 

President, Gertrude Jacobson. 

Vice President, Ruth Carlmark. 

Secretary and Treasurer, Esthena Randolph. 

Historian, Ruth Nelson. 

Librarian, Freda Mattson. 

Accompanist, LeRoy Carlson. 

PERSONNEL 

First Soprano — Irene Carstens, Ruth Nelson, Elizabeth Olmsted, Nancy 
Olson, Esther Petterson, Edna Wilson. 

Second Soprano — Florence Anderson, Eunice Christianson, Esther Hay- 
wood, Gertrude Jacobson, Evelyn Mills, Hilvy Ryden. 

First Alto — Ruth Carlmark, Inez Gull, Myrtle Larson, Veva Marley, 
Freda Mattson, Esthena Randolph. 

Second Alto — Mildred Blomgren, Leona Haywood, Edna Linderholm, 
Irene Olson, Florence Watson, Esther Younggren. 

THE JUNIOR ORCHESTRA 
The purpose of this orchestra is to acquaint young students with the 
rudiments of ensemble and orchestral playing. Rehearsals are held 
regularly once a week and are in charge of the director of the Violin 
department. 

MEMBERS 

Violins — Eugene Burton, Philip Lecata, Euvodia Hypse, Genevieve Hunt, 
Kenneth Kempe, Thelma Stegman, Carl Nelson, Louise Bolin, Eliza- 
beth Gaylord, Carl Bergstrom, Karl Kirkman, Orville Jenson, Edwin 
Lipton. 

Cello — Esther Haywood. 

Flutes — John Leaf, Wilford Eitman. 

Clarinet — Ruth Hellberg. 

Cornets — Ralph Ostrom, Howard Johnson. 

Piano — Hilma Carlson. 

THE ENDOWMENT FUND SOCIETY 
The Augustana College and Theological Seminary Endowment Fund 
Society was organized in the spring of 1894, and chartered by the State 
of Illinois. Its object, as its name implies, is to secure endowments 



GENERAL INFORMATION 127 

for this institution. Its active members are, for the most part, ladies 
living in Rock Island and Moline, tho any lady paying the sum of $1.20 
annually and subscribing to the society's constitution is eligible to 
membership. Its honorary members pay one dollar annually or ten 
dollars at one time for life membership. All moneys secured by the 
society are conscientiously cared for, and invested and loaned out on 
first class securities only. 

The society has received a number of substantial gifts from various 
sources, but the greater part of its funds is made up of membership 
fees, and now, at the close of its twenty-fourth fiscal year, it has to its 
credit the sum of $10,455.08. 

While pursuing its original object of gathering an endowment, the 
society has endeavored to maintain a social standing and a level of 
culture in keeping with the dignity of such an organization. 

For a number of years informal programs have been given at the 
meetings, while eleven years ago its first year-book was published, 
giving programs with topics and dates of meetings, hostesses for each, 
together with other information valuable to the society. Since then 
the year-book has been issued regularly and has contributed much 
toward the permanency and development of the society. 

Contributions, donations, and bequests are hereby solicited. They 
should be sent to the General Treasurer, Mrs. S. G. Youngert, 960 Thirty- 
eighth Street, Rock Island, 111. 

The present officers are: President, Mrs. C. W. Foss; Vice President, 
Mrs. L. G. Abrahamson; Recording Secretary, Mrs. A. R. Wallin; Cor- 
responding Secretary, Mrs. Arthur A. Milton; Treasurer, Mrs. J. P. 
Magnusson; General Treasurer, Mrs. S. G. Youngert; Organizer of 
Auxiliary Societies, Prof. A. Kempe. Auditing Committee: Miss Jose- 
phine Peetz, Mrs. Geo. W. Johnson, Mrs. Algert Anker; Year-Book 
Committee: Mrs. E. T. Anderson, Mrs. Wm. Gamble, Miss Martha Foss; 
Nominating Committee: Mrs. C. G. Thulin, Mrs. Axel Stock, Mrs. H. 
L. Becker. 

THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

The Alumni Association of Augustana College was organized by the 
first graduating class of the College in the spring of 1877. With a very 
few exceptions all the alumni are enrolled as members. Its objects 
are promoting of literary and scientific culture, especially in the halls 
of Alma Mater, the reunion of early friends and colaborers in literary 
pursuits, and the revival of the pleasant associations that entwine 
themselves about student life. The association holds its annual meeting 
on Commencement day. 

Some six years ago the association began the work of soliciting 
contributions among the members toward a fund to be known as the 
Alumni Scholarship Fund. Approximately one in ten of the alumni 
have responded so far, and the fund is now about $700, with pledges 



128 GENERAL INFORMATION 

aggregating $100 still to be redeemed. When the fund shall have 
reached $1,000, the interest will be available for the promotion of 
scholarship at Augustana. 

OFFICERS 

President, Grant Hultberg. 
First Vice President, Rev. J. N. Brandelle. 
Second Vice President, Dr. J. Westerlund. 
Third Vice President, Prof. A. R. Wallin. 
Recording Secretary, Mrs. K. T. Anderson. 
Treasurer, Carl Londberg. 

THE STUDENTS' AID FUND OF AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND 
THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

This fund was established by the Synod in 1908 to aid needy students 
who are preparing for the ministry. Applications for aid may be handed 
in at any time to the committee which has charge of this fund. The 
committee is appointed by the Synod and consists of the professors of 
the Theological Seminary and four professors from the College. 
The following rules have been adopted by the committee: 
Art. I. Regular students in the Theological Seminary, also regular 
students in the Academy or in the College, who are preparing for the 
ministry and who are in need, may receive aid from this fund, but a 
student in the Academy or College in order to receive aid: 

a) Must have pursued studies one school-year at the institution with 
marked intelligence and good deportment. 

b) Must present to the committee a written testimonial from his 
pastor as to his character and Christian life. 

c) Must have in view entering the Theological Seminary after gradu- 
ation from the College. 

Art. II. a) The amounts paid shall not exceed ten dollars per month 
to each student, and $90 shall be the limit of loans granted during any 
24 months to any one student. 

b) A beneficiary student of this fund shall upon the completion of 
his Seminary course, or if he decides to enter some other profession, 
then immediately and in any case before he leaves the institution, give 
a note covering the full amount of aid received by him from this fund; 
such note to be payable to the Students' Aid Fund, and bearing interest 
at the rate of 4 per cent, the first three years, 6 per cent, for subsequent 
years after date. All notes become due 3 years after the ordination of 
the beneficiary. 

Art. III. Donations to this fund of one hundred dollars or larger 
amounts shall be deposited in a Savings Bank as a permanent fund of 
which the interest alone may be used. 

Art. IV. Additions or amendments to these rules may be made by 



GENERAL INFORMATION 129 

a unanimous vote of the entire committee in charge of the Students' 
Aid Fund. 

THE MRS. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 

In memory of his wife Johanna Charlotta, who died January 30, 
1909, Professor Dr. N. Forsander has donated to Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary the sum of one thousand dollars to be known as 
the Mrs. N. Forsander Scholarship. The annual proceeds of this fund 
shall be given to some student of this Theological Seminary, who is 
well known as an earnest Christian both in faith and life, as a diligent 
student especially in Church History, and as having gifts for ministerial 
work. 

THE O. H. THORSTENBERG SCHOLARSHIP 

Mr. 0. H. Thorstenberg of Assaria, Kansas, donated by will one 
thousand dollars to the institution to establish a scholarship, the annual 
income of which is to be used to assist some worthy student, male or 
female, who intends to serve the Church as pastor, teacher or organist. 

THE ANNA WESTMAN STIPEND 

On February 10, 1911, the sum of fifty dollars was received by the 
College faculty, accompanied by a communication from a lady who 
wished no public mention to be made of her name, stating that she 
obligated herself "to donate annually, for an indefinite period of years, 
a sum of money to be used as a benefit to one or more deserving, 
industrious lady students pursuing studies in the Collegiate depart- 
ment of Augustana College, the beneficiaries to be chosen by a com- 
mittee of the College faculty. 

It was further stated that "this fund shall be known as the 'Anna 
Westman Stipend,' being given as an appreciative memorial to Miss 
Westman, who was the friend and helper of young women struggling, 
like herself, to obtain a college education," and further, that "this fund 
shall be announced annually on January 7th, the date of Miss Westman's 
birth, or as soon thereafter as is possible." 

Miss Anna Westman was graduated from Augustana College in 1892, 
and was instructor in Mathematics at the institution for two years. 
She died in Cleveland, Ohio, August 1, 1910. 

THE CLASS OF '85 SCHOLARSHIP 
A scholarship was established in the spring of 1911 by the alumni 

of the class of 1885, subject to the following regulations: 
Art. I. Name: — This scholarship shall be known as the Class of '85 

Scholarship. 
Art. II. Purpose: — This scholarship is an expression of love and 

gratitude to the Alma Mater from the members of the class of '85, and 

its purpose is to encourage and aid the cause of higher education at 

Augustana. 

College Catalog. 9. 



130 GENERAL INFORMATION 

Art. III. Value: — This scholarship shall have a face value of not 

less than $1,000.00, and shall yield an annual income of not less than 

$50.00, to be available in two installments, one at the end of each of 

the two terms of the school-year. 
Art. IV. Provisions: — This scholarship shall be conferred by the 

College faculty upon: 

Sec. 1. A member of the Freshman class of Augustana College, 
Sec. 2. Whose deportment and diligence are approved by the faculty, 
Sec. 3. Whose average standing in all required subjects of any course 

of the Freshman year shall be the highest. 

Sec. 4. The faculty may for any cause withhold the scholarship, or 

confer it upon a student who does not fulfil the requirements of Sections 

1 — 3 of this article. 

THE DR. N. FORSANDER SCHOLARSHIP 
A sum of thirteen hundred dollars ($1,300) has been collected by Dr. 
N. Forsander from among his personal friends for the purpose of estab- 
lishing a scholarship at Augustana College and Theological Seminary, 
named by the Board of Directors the Dr. N. Forsander Scholarship. 
The annual income of this scholarship shall be given to some student 
of this Theological Seminary, who is well known as an earnest Chris- 
tian, who is faithful and diligent in his studies, and who has gifts 
fitting him for the holy ministry, preference being given to one who 
intends to devote himself to the work of foreign missions. The bene- 
ficiary of this fund shall be appointed by the Theological faculty. 

THE SEMINARY DORMITORY FUND 
The sum of $1,000 was on Sept. 11, 1912, donated to the institution 
by Dr. N. Forsander, which amount together with the interest is to be 
used for a dormitory for students of the Theological Seminary. With 
the interest this fund now amounts to $1,109.98. 

LOCATION AND BUILDINGS 
Rock Island, a city of about twenty-five thousand inhabitants, is 
beautifully located on the banks of the Mississippi River. The bold 
bluffs on the Illinois side of the river here recede to a distance of about 
a mile, leaving a beautiful and gently rising plain, upon which the city 
is built. In beauty of scenery, healthfulness of location and climate, 
Rock Island stands foremost among Illinois towns. Three great lines 
of railroads, the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific, the Chicago, Bur- 
lington and Quincy, and the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul, center 
here, rendering the city easy of access from all parts of the country. 
The institution is situated in the eastern part of the city near the base 
of a prominent bluff, from which the view is both striking and pic- 
turesque. Opposite lies the city of Davenport, Iowa, commandingly 



GENERAL INFORMATION 131 

located on the bluffs which rise almost directly from the river. To 
the east the eye rests on the tall chimneys of the busy city of Moline, 
rendered famous by her manufacturers. Directly in front of the College 
grounds, in the middle of the river, is the government island of Rock 
Island, containing over nine hundred acres of land upon which the 
government's largest arsenal is built. On the lower end of the island 
rests the iron railroad and wagon bridge which spans the river at this 
point, thus rendering Davenport easily accessible. 

The grounds of the institution consist of about thirty-six acres of 
land. One of the street car lines, extending from the business parts 
of Rock Island to those of Moline and passing by all the passenger 
depots of both cities, also passes by the corner of the College grounds 
on Seventh avenue and Thirty-eighth street. 

The following buildings, belonging to the institution, are located on 
the grounds: 

The New College Building, occupied since February, 1888, is located 
near the center of the grounds, fronting Seventh avenue. It is a stone 
structure of the pure Renaissance style. The basement and the first 
floor are devoted to the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Col- 
legiate and Academic Departments, and faculty rooms. The second 
floor contains the recitation rooms and lecture halls of the Theological 
Department, Cable Hall, and the Chapel, which occupies two stories in 
the east end of the building. The third floor is given to the Art De- 
partment, Biological laboratory and recitation rooms. 

The Denkmann Memorial Library, the corner stone of which was 
laid January 21, 1910, and which was dedicated May 31, 1911, is the gift 
to the institution of the sons and daughters of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Fredrick C. A. Denkmann of Rock Island. The names of these generous 
donors are: Mrs. Marie Antoniette Reimers, Mrs. Apollonia Adelaide 
Davis, Mrs. Elsie Augusta Marshall, Mrs. Catherine Wentworth, Mrs. 
Susanne C. Hauberg, Mr. Edward P. Denkmann and Mr. Fredrick C. 
Denkmann. The building, located in the northwestern part of the 
campus, is a magnificent structure of marble-like stone, with the most 
sumptuous interior appointments. The ground floor contains a lecture 
room, a memorial hall, administration offices, etc. The second floor 
contains the great main reading room, extending across the whole 
front, 120 feet long by 48 feet wide. On the third floor is a large room 
set apart for the Museum. The rear of the building contains stack- 
rooms for 100,000 volumes, librarian's office, seminar rooms, waiting 
rooms, etc. 

The Old College Building, occupied since 1875, is a large brick struc- 
ture situated on Seventh avenue, east of the New building. It is de- 
voted principally to students' rooms, the household department, and 
class-rooms of the Commercial department. 
The New Gymnasium Building is one story and basement, brick and 



132 GENERAL INFORMATION 

steel construction, size 90 by 140 feet. The dressing rooms with ample 
locker facilities, a swimming pool 60 by 25 and a large store room are 
located in the basement. The main assembly hall together with the 
balcony seats 2,300. Above the balcony a first class running track, 
14% laps to the mile with cork carpet, is constructed. The gymnasium 
is equipped with new and ample paraphernalia. For concert purposes 
there is a stage which seats two hundred people and a first class pipe 
organ is also installed. 

The Ladies' Hall, a large brick structure, is located near the eastern 
side of the grounds. On the ground floor suitable rooms are used by 
the School of Music as practise rooms. 

Ericson Hall, a brick building, is located in Ericson Park. It is at 
present used for the Chemical and Physical laboratories. 

Besides the above there are two frame buildings located on Thirty- 
fifth street and used as residences. 

THE CHARTER 

Section 1. Be it enacted by the People of the State of Illinois, rep- 
resented in the General Assambly, That Erland Carlsson, T. X. Hassel- 
quist, Carl Johan P. Peterson, Ole Anderson, Iver Lawson, John Amond- 
son, Carl Stromberg, John Field, and their successors in office, to be 
elected as hereinafter provided, be and are hereby constituted a body 
corporate and politic, under the name and style of the Augustana Col- 
lege and Theological Seminary, and by that name and style shall have 
perpetual succession with power to sue and be sued, implead and be 
impleaded, and shall be capable in law of taking and holding by gift 
or grant, devise, or otherwise, and of purchasing and holding, and con- 
veying, both in law and equity, any estate or interest therein, real, 
personal or mixed, and shall have power to execute and fulfil all such 
trusts as may be confided in said corporation, and take, hold, use, 
manage, lease, and dispose of all such trust property that may in any 
manner come to said corporation, charged with any trust or trusts in 
conformity therewith; to have and to use a common seal, and to alter 
same at pleasure. 

Sec. 2. Said corporation shall have power to establish and maintain 
in or near the town of Paxton, Ford Co., Illinois, or any other suitable 
place within the State of Illinois, a college and theological seminary 
under the patronage and control of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lu- 
theran Augustana Synod in North America. And the persons herein 
before mentioned as incorporators shall constitute the first board of 
trustees, or directors. Their successors shall also be chosen, and the 
institution be governed by the said Augustana Synod, as provided for 
by the Constitution of the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augus- 
tana Seminary already enacted by said Synod; which Constitution the 
Synod shall have power to amend or alter as the needs and develop- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 133 

ment of the institution may require; Provided always, that such amend- 
ments or alterations, or by-laws, which the Syond may enact, shall be 
made in conformity with the Constitution of said Synod, and not in- 
consistent with the Constitution and laws of the State of Illinois. 

Sec. 3. It is also provided that the trustees or directors shall re- 
spectively hold their office until their successors are elected and quali- 
fied. 

Sec. 4. In case of vacancy in the board of trustees or directors, by 
death or otherwise, between the meetings of the Synod, the said .board 
may, by ballot, fill such vacancy, by the election of a person or persons 
of the Lutheran Church, and such a person or persons so elected, shall 
hold their office until the next meeting of the Augustana Synod, when 
such vacancy shall be filled by the Synod. 

Sec. 5. In case any of the trustees or directors should, at any time, 
cease to be members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, they shall 
thenceforth cease to be trustees, and their place may be filled in the 
manner specified in section four. 

Sec. 6. The board of trustees or directors shall have power also to 
confer the usual degree of Doctor of Divinity, Master of Arts, Bachelor 
of Arts, or any other Literary or Scientific degrees, on such person or 
persons as they may deem entitled thereto, on the recommendation of 
the faculty. 

Sec. 7. The doctrines taught in the Seminary department of said 
institution shall conform to and be in harmony with the doctrines held 
and maintained by the Augustana Synod as defined in article two of 
the Constitution of said Synod, in the following words, to wit, "As a 
Christian body in general, particularly as an Evangelical Lutheran, this 
Synod acknowledges that the Holy Scriptures, the revealed word of 
God, are the only sufficient and infallible rule and standard of faith 
and practise, and also retains and confesses not only the three oldest 
symbols (the Apostolic, the Nicene, and the Athanasian), but also the 
unaltered Augsburg Confession, as a short and correct summary of the 
principal Christian doctrines as understood and explained in the other 
symbolical books of the Lutheran Church." Any deviation by the pro- 
fessors and teachers from the doctrinal standard shall be deemed suf- 
ficient cause to be dealt with as prescribed in Art. 6 of the Constitution 
of the Seminary, adopted at the Synodical meeting in Clinton, Wis- 
consin, June 5th to 11th, A. D. 1860. 

Sec. 8. The property of said corporation, both real and personal, not 
exceeding the value of One Hundred Thousand Dollars, shall forever 
remain free from taxation. 

Sec. 9. This act to take effect and be in force from and after the 
passage, and to be deemed a public act. Approved Feb. 16th, 1865, and 
amended March 10th, 1869. 

Vide Private Laws of the State of Illinois, Vol. 1 (1865), page 21, 
also Vol. 1 (1869), page 37. 



134 GENERAL INFORMATION 

HISTORICAL SKETCH. 

Nearly three hundred years ago Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden con- 
ceived the idea of establishing a Swedish colony in the New World. 
His heroic death at Liitzen in 1632 seemed to put an end to his plans, 
but his daughter Queen Christina with the advice of the great states- 
man Oxenstjerna sought to realize the hopes of the dead king. In 
1637 Swedish colonists, "the Pilgrim Fathers of the^North", sailed from 
Gothenburg to America in two ships (Kalmar Nyckel and Fcgel Grip), 
which arrived at the Delaware River in the middle of March 1638. 
Fort Christina was founded and, during the years immediately follow- 
ing, settlements were made at Philadelphia, Wilmington and other 
neighboring places. From the first, Swedish Evangelical Lutheran 
churches were founded, the first clergyman being R. Torkillus from 
Skara and Gothenburg. The colonists dealt with the Indians in a 
friendly and fair spirit and won their confidence. The first missionary 
among the Indians in America was Johannes Campanius during the 
years 1643 — 1648, who began his work even before John Eliot af Massa- 
chusetts went forth as missionary among the aborigines. Campanius 
learned the language of the Indians and translated Luther's catechism, 
with explanations, into their tongue, a copy of which translation is 
found in the library of Augustana College and Theological Seminary. 

The descendants of these Swedish colonists took part in the Revo- 
lutionary war and in the forming of the government of the United 
States. One of these, John Morton, cast the decisive vote by which 
Pennsylvania in the Continental Congress joined the other colonies in 
the declaration of Independence and was one of the signers of that act. 
Another descendant of these pilgrim Swedes was John Hanson, the 
first president of Congress under the Constitution of 1789. The chil- 
dren of these colonies have taken active part in the upbuilding of their 
states. The virtual founder of Pennsylvania University was Charles 
Stille, a colonial Swede, and some of the chancellors have claimed Swe- 
dish colonial descent. 

The great tide of emigration from Northern continental Europe did 
not begin, however, till the years between 1840 and 1850. The pioneers 
who then came made their way mainly to the northern Mississippi 
valley, founding their homes in the large unsettled tracts of northern 
Illinois and Iowa, later in Wisconsin, Minnesota and other states. 
These immigrants had been members of the Lutheran Church in the 
mother country, and were as a rule a religious and churchly people, 
wishing to retain their religious heritage on the new soil. Earnest, 
pious men came over as pastors, and Lutheran congregations were 
early established among the Swedes and Norwegians. At the organi- 
zation of the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Northern Illinois in 1851, 
several Scandinavian pastors were present and took part in the organi- 
zation. The scattered Scandinavian and American Lutherans in this 



GENERAL INFORMATION 135 

section of the country were thus joined in one Synod. The Scandi- 
navians increased rapidly and before 1860 they constituted about one- 
half of the Synod, and formed three separate conferences. This Synod 
and other Lutheran bodies in the West established a school, known 
as the Illinois State University, at Springfield, 111., for the special 
purpose of educating Lutheran ministers. At a meeting of the Synod 
in 1855, the question of establishing a Scandinavian professorship at 
the University was favorably considered, and at a subsequent meeting 
a resolution to establish such a professorship was adopted, and Rev. 
L. P. Esbjorn, the first of the pioneer pastors, was elected to the chair. 
He entered upon his duties in the fall of 1858, and served two years, 
having among his pupils (in the subject of mathematics) the son of 
Abraham Lincoln, who sometimes consulted with Esbjorn concerning 
his son's studies. Prof. Esbjorn resigned this professorship in the 
spring of 1860. Differences with regard to the doctrinal basis of the 
Synod existed from the beginning between the Scandinavians and 
American members. Professor Esbjorn's resignation brought matters 
to a crisis. The Scandinavians met in convention in Chicago, 111., 
April 23 — 27, I860, and after long deliberation unanimously resolved 
on April 27 (which date is therefore celebrated at Augustana as Found- 
ers' day) to organize a synod for themselves, and to establish a theo- 
logical Seminary of their own. The organization of the Synod, which 
was to be known as the Scandinavian Evangelical Lutheran Augustana 
Synod, was completed at a subsequent convention held at Jefferson 
Prairie, near Clinton, Wis., June 5 — 11 the same year. It is to these 
meetings that Augustana College and Theological Seminary traces its 
origin. It was for three years located at Chicago, the instruction 
mainly being given in the old church then located on Superior st., be- 
tween Wells and La Salle streets. 

These were years of hardship for the young institution. The call of 
Abraham Lincoln for volunteers in the Civil war was heeded by some 
of the students and by many, who otherwise would have become stu- 
dents of Augustana, two of the sons of president Esbjorn enlisting in 
the army. In 1863, when Prof. Esbjorn resigned, the institution was 
moved to Paxton, 111., where Prof. T. N. Hasselquist became its head, 
which position he retained till his death in 1891. The institution was 
incorporated under the laws of Illinois in 1863 and named Augustana 
College and Seminary and afterward by a special act of the legislature 
in 1865, a charter was granted which was amended by a supplementary 
act by the same body in 1869, since which time the institution has been 
known by its present name. 

Instruction was given both in Seminary and College subjects from 
the very beginning, and college classes were formed as early as 1866. 
Every year from 1861 students were sent forth from the theological 
Seminary to enter the work of the ministry of the Augustana Synod, 



136 ROLL OF STUDENTS 

being able to supply only in part the ever growing needs of the Church. 
The first graduating class from the College department received the 
degree of A. B. in 1877, since which time this has been an ever growing 
department of the institution. 

In 1887 the Conservatory of Music was added, and the following year 
a Business Department was organized. The Normal Department was 
established in 1891. In connection with the Conservatory of Music a 
School of Art was established by the Board of Directors in 1895. 

The original plan of the Seminary was to have at least three pro- 
fessors, one for each of the leading languages used — Swedish, Nor- 
wegian, and English. This plan was not fully realized until 1868, when 
Rev. S. L. Harkey was elected to the chair of the English language and 
Rev. A. Wenaas to that of the Norwegian. The whole plan, however, 
was completely changed in 1870, when the Norwegians withdrew and 
organized a separate synod and established an institution of their own. 

The courses of instruction in the Theological Seminary were gradu- 
ally made to embrace two years, and from 1874 there were two regular 
classes in the Seminary until 1890, when the university plan was 
adopted, and the instruction was arranged in distinct and independent 
courses. This plan was approved by the Synod in 1891. The number of 
courses was first fourteen, but has since increased to twenty. Ten 
departments of instruction have gradually been established in the 
College proper, viz.: English and Philosophy, Swedish, Latin, Greek, 
Modern Languages, Christianity, History and Political Science, Biology 
and Geology, Physics and Chemistry, and Mathematics and Astronomy. 
During the last decades all subjects in the College and Academy are 
taught in English, except the Swedish language and literature. Both 
of these departments belong to the North Central Association and as 
a first class American College fulfill the high requirements of this 
Association. In the Theological Seminary the instruction is given by 
means of both English and Swedish, as the pastor in our Synod needs 
to master both these languages. 

The institution as a whole has always been open to students of good 
moral character, without regard to language, race, nationality, or creed. 
Lady students were allowed to attend instruction in the various classes, 
but were not matriculated until 1886. Of the students in the Theo- 
logical Seminary, 857 have been ordained to the holy ministry. In 
the Collegiate Department 635 have graduated with the degree of A. B., 
and 40 with the degree of B. S. The Commercial Department numbers 
1,071 graduates, the Conservatory of Music 164, and the Normal School 
37. The graduates of the present year are not included in any of the 
above figures. 

The first president of the institution was Prof. L. P. Esbjorn, who 
served during the first three years. When the institution was removed 
to Paxton, in 1863, Dr. T. N. Hasselquist, who had just accepted a call 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 137 

to the new congregation at that place, was appointed to take charge 
of the school until a permanent professor and president could be se- 
cured. The position, however, became permanent, and he served as 
president until his death in 1891. 

Dr. O. Olsson was elected to succeed him. His death occurred on 
May 12, 1900. 

Dr. C. W. Foss served as Acting President until the summer of 1901, 
when Dr Gustav Andreen, of Yale University, was elected to the 
presidency. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

During the months of July and August, 1916, a Summer school for 
teachers was conducted at Augustana College. The results, in respect 
to attendance, quality of work done, and practical benefit, were so grati- 
fying that it was decided to make this a permanent feature of the 
Institution. Accordingly announcement is hereby made that during 
the Summer of 1918 courses in English Literature, Psychology, Prin- 
ciples of teaching and History of Education are offered to afford the 
teachers and those preparing to teach in our public schools an oppor- 
tunity to improve their equipment for their professional work. These 
courses will be strictly College grade and will be given in double 
periods of an hour and a half each for six weeks, five days each week, 
so that the work done will be equivalent to that of twelve weeks with 
forty-five minute periods. By this arrangement, which has proved 
entirely satisfactory in the past and is practised at the State Normal 
schools, students will be able to earn three full semester hours in each 
of the subjects named. The credits earned in this way are recognized 
by the local school authorities and also by the State Examining Board 
at Springfield; they will count not only for State Certificate but also 
for graduation at this and other Colleges. 

Additional courses, of Academy or high school grade, will be offered 
in English Grammar, U. S. History, Civics, Arithmetic, and Algebra 
for the benefit of those who may wish to review or make up in these 
branches preparatory to examination for second grade certificate or 
for entrance to College, provided a sufficient number enroll to justify 
the giving of such courses. 

The term will begin Morday, June 24th, and end Friday, Aug. 2nd. 

RATES OF TUITION 

For College grade work $12.00 

For Academy grade work 10.00 

For further particulars adress the President, Gustav Andreen, Rock 
Island, 111. 



138 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Graduates, Degrees and Diplomas 

1917. 



HONORARY DEGREES 



Rev Dr. J. A. W. Haas 



Doctor of Laws 

Pres. Muhlenberg College, Al- 
lentown, Pa. 



Consul G. N. Swan 



Doctor Litterarum Humanorum 

Sioux City, Iowa 



Rev. J. O. Cavallin 
Rev. J. G. Dahlberg 
Rev. A. W. Edwins 
Rev. O. J. Johnson 

Rev. P. M. Lindberg 
Rev. M. Noyd 



Rev. J. H. Ford 
Rev. O. M. Norlie 



Doctor of Divinity 

Moorhead, Minn. 

Berwyn, 111. 

Missionary, Honan, China 

Pres. Gustavus Adolphus College, 

St. Peter, Minn. 
Omaha, Neb. 
El Campo, Texas 



DEGREES IN COURSE 

SAXCTAE TEOLOGIAE DOCTOR 

Parkers Prairie, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



Rev. N. A. Nelson 



CAXDIDATUS SACRAE THEOLOGIAE 

Osceola, Neb. 



RACHELOR OF 

Rev. H. T. Egedahl 
Rev. C. C. A. Jensen 
Rev. S. Hjalmar Swanson 
Rev. Olof Holen 
Rev. B. A. Olsen 
Rev. Walter A. Tilberg 
Svante Anderson Erling 
Prank Gustav Granquist 
Henry George Hanson 
Gustaf Wilhelm Henry 
Carl Arthur Johnson 



DIYIXTTY 

Viking, Alta., Canada 
Clear Lake, Iowa 
Deerwood, Minn. 
Tacoma, Wash. 
Seneca, 111. 
Moline, 111. 
Fergus Falls, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Weston, Neb. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



139 



Johan Alfred Lundgren 
Arthur Eugene Olson 
Victor Rosenius Pearson 
Arthur Lawrence Peterson 
Herbert Carl Morton Swanson 
Levin Julius Trued 



Kane, Pa. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Bertrand, Nebr. 
Hepburn, Iowa 
Ceresco, Nebr 



GRADUATES WITH THE S. M. DEGREE. 

Ralph David Hult Kearney, Nebr. 

Henning Leonard Johnson Lanse, Pa. 

Karl Johansson Batavia 

Carl Anderson Julius Lindsborg, Kansas 

Bert Martin Samuelson Rock Island 

Lawrence Joseph Sodergren Holdrege, Nebr. 



Emil Benzon 

Ragnar Per Emil Byrenius 

Fred Gustav Olson 

Nils Anders Blomstrand 

Olof Hans Miller 

Samuel M. Hill 



HOSPITANTS 

Rock Island 
oland, Sweden 
Gladstone, Mich. 
Aurora, Nebr. 
Leonardville, Kansas 
Colton, Ore. 



John Wheaton Casto 



MASTER OF ARTS 

Rock Island 



BACHELOR 

Carl Arthur Anderson 
Rachel Anderson 
Arthur Garfield Benson 
Luther John Benson 
Abby Denman Blakemore 
Carl Leonard Carlson 
Ruth Amalia Carlson 
Anna Ingeborg Cesander 
Marie Theresa De Vere 
Victor Alexander Elmblad 
Edmond Russell Fredrickson 
Hjalmar Edward Fryxell 
Gerda Marie Hiller 
Carl Titus Amadeus Holmen 
Arthur Theodore Johnson 
Lael Alberta Regina Johnson 
Lillian Henrietta Johnson 
Esther Hildegard Larson 



OF ARTS 

East Tawas, Mich. 
Galesburg 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Portville, N. Y. 
Moline 

Sioux Falls, S. D. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Skanee, Mich. 
Essex, Iowa 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Chesterton, Ind. 
Red Wing, Minn. 
Gary, Ind. 
Smethport, Pa. 



140 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Lawrence DeWitte Lundberg 
Harold Raymor Lundgren 
John Anderson Martin 
Bessie Lavina Miller 
John Arthur Molander 
Julius Vincent Nordgren 
Petrus Herbert Nordlander 
Ruth Florents Olson 
Nils Holger Pearson 
Elmer Theodore Peterson 
Carl Pontus Petersson 
Karl Peter Silberg 
John Nilson Steimer 
Arthur Waldemar Swedberg 



Chicago 

Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Turlock, Calif. 
Rock Island 
Marinette, Wis. 
Galva 

Rock Island 
Sioux City, Iowa 
Providence, R. I. 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Ironwood, Mich. 
Sjobo, Sweden 
Rhinelander, Wis. 



GRADUATES OF THE CONSERVATORY 



PIAXO 



Diploma 
Martin Conrad Dahlberg Daggett, Mich. 

Olga Elizabeth Edlen Moline 

Lawrence D. Witte Lundberg Chicago 

Eleanor Valencourt Shaw Milan 



Ruth Adelia Carlmark 
Mabel Ruby Steinman 



Certificate 

Moline 
Rockford 



ORGAX 

Diploma 
Martin Conrad Dahlberg Daggett, Mich. 

Certificate 
Lydia Wilhelmina Johnson Rock Island 



Olga Elizabeth Edlen 

Ruth Eliason 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 



PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 

Moline 

Swedeburg, Nebr. 
Lake City, Minn. 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 

GRADUATES OF THE COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



141 



Alf Leander Anderson 
Carl Anderson 
Clifford Johnson 
Edythe L. E. Johnson 



GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT 

Missoula, Mont. 
Missoula, Mont. 
Chariton, Iowa 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 



Eric Paul Torsten Olson 



Courtland, Kansas 



Albert August Anderson 
Euphemia Billburg 
Herbert George Carlson 
Constantine Knanishu 
Fred J. Nelson 



CERTIFICATE 

In Bookkeeping 

Kenora, Ont. 
Rock Island 
Harcourt, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 



In 
Sigrid Marie Anderson 
Ila Leone Anthony- 
Bessie Baker 
Elsie Dorothy Bildahl 
Angela Beatrice Bourgaise 
Laura Christine Carlson 
Yngve Carlson 
Myrtle May Cheney 
Audrey May Cropper 
Grace Veronia Duffy 
Ester Mabel Fant 
Blance Catherine Glockhoff 
Marjorie Graham 
Grace Helen Griswold 
Alice Evelyn Johnson 
Edith Lenore Eillen Johnson 
Vincent Johnson 
Gertrude Kerr 
Gertrude Lewis 
Elliott Monett Lundberg 
Edward William Mangelsdorf 
Carl Leonard Nelson 
Leone Elva Nelson 
Mable Peterson 
Ruby Matilda Peterson 
Elsie Elizabeth Russ 
Dorothy Elizabeth Scherrer 



Shorthand 

Prophetstown 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rockford 

Davenport, Iowa 

Erie, Pa. 

Moline 

Milan 

Swift Current, Sask., Can. 

Rock Island 

Ophiem 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Iron Mountain, Mich. 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Lynn Center 

Oakland, Nebr. 

Galesburg 

Moline 

Rock Island 



142 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Hazel Spaulding Rock Island 

Mildred Alfreda Spencer Rock Island 

Helen Matilda Storbeck Rock Island 

Florence Olivia Swanson Altona 

Lucille Swift Camden, Mich. 

Albert Taber Rock Island 

Florence Anna Geneva Thoren Denver, Colo. 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



143 



Roll of Students 1918 



THE THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



POSTGRADUATES 

Candidate for the degree Sacra? Theologue Doctor. 
Rev. N. A. Nelson, A. B., B. D., C. S. T. Osceola, Nebr. 

Candidates for the degree Candidatus Sacrw Theologian, C. S. T. 



Rev. Emil Gottfrid Chinlund, A. B., B. D., 

Has completed six courses. 
Rev. H. E. Sandstedt, A. B., B. D., 

Has completed three courses. 
Rev. Jno. E. Oslund, A. B., B. D., 

Has completed four courses. 
Rev. Axel C. Anderson, A. B., B. D., 

Has completed two courses. 
Rev. H. D. Hoover, Ph. D., 
Rev. Adolf A. Wilfrid, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. V. E. Holmstedt, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Anton Linder, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. E. P. Karleen, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. E. W. Magnusson A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Waldo C. Ekeberg, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Gustave Carlson, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Edwin Olmon, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Ture V. Anderson, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Emil Johnson, A. B., B. D., 
Rev. Joshua E. Nelson, A. B., B. D.. 
Prof. Jacob Tanner, A. M., B. D., 
Rev. Axel N. Nelson, A. B., B. D., 

Has completed one course. 
Rev. Philip Beuscher, A. B., B. D., Ph. B., 



Omaha, Nebr. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Moscow, Idaho. 

Sweden 

Carthage, 111. 
Mount, Jewett, Pa. 
Manhattan, Kan. 
Bradford, Pa. 
Sioux City, Iowa. 
Geneseo, 111. 
Peoria, 111. 
Gardner, Mass. 
Saskatchewan, Can 
Missoula, Mont. 
Alcester, S. D. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Moorhead, Minn. 
La Porte, Ind. 

Freeport 



Candidates for the degree Divinitatis Baccalaureus, B. D. 
Rev. A. M. Knudsen, A. B., Boulder, Colo. 

Rev. W. Albert Ericson, A. B., Assaria, Kan. 

Rev. W. X. Magnuson, A. B., Malmo, Nebr. 



REGULAR STUDENTS 

SENIOR CLASS 

Leonard Alexander 

A.B., Upsala College 1915 



Kenosha, Wis. 



144 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Paul Harold Andreen 

A.B., Augustana College, 1911 
Victor Emanuel Beck 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Carl August Bengtson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1915 
Adolf Theodor Bergquist 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Anton Emanuel Bomgren 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Carl Oscar Bostrom 

A.B., Upsala College, 1915 
Otto Henry Bostrom 

A.B., Augustana College, 1910 

Ph.D., Yale University, 1916 
Charles William Erickson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1913 
Frank Harry Hanson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Frank William Hanson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Gustavus Anderson Herbert 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Arthur Oscar Hjelm 

A.B., Upsala College, 1916 
Ernest Hjalmar Jackson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1915 
Albert John Laurell 

A.B., Upsala College, 1915 
Magnus Arthur Johnson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Otto Philip Johnson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Lawrence Edwin Jones 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Julius Albin Larson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Johannes Emanuel Lindberg 

A.B., Lund University, Sweden, 1911 
Albin Lindgren 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1914 
Herbert Sigfrid Magney 

A.B., University of Minnesota, 1915 
Carl David Waldemar Nelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 



Rock Island 
St. James, Minn. 
Lindsborg, Kan. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Washington, Conn. 
Portland, Conn. 
Rock Island 

St. Hilaire, Minn. 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Burtrum, Minn. 
Iron Mountain, Mich. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Malmo, Nebr. 
Orion 
Gary, Ind. 
Crooks, Minn. 
Warren, Pa. 
Canton 
Chicago 

Lindstrom, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Marathon, Iowa 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



145 



Johan Fredrik .Nelson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Theodore Bengt Nordale 

A.B., Gustavns Adolphus College, 1915 
Martin Oscar Olson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Halvar George Randolph 

A.B., Upsala College, 1913 
Ernst Julius Sakrison 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 

MIDDLE CLASS 

Carl Gideon Harrison Ahnquist 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 
John Benson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 
Wilhelm Rudolph Bergh 

A.B., Upsala College, 1916 
Carl Oscar Carlson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 
Oscar Emanuel Clauson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Carl George Engdahl 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Ture Virgilius Anselm Ferm 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Carl Johan Franz en 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
Clarence Oscar Granlund 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Elmer Julius Holt 

A.B., Bethany College, 1916 
Carl Peter Constant Johnson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Ernest Arthur Larson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1914 
August Peterson Lawrence 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1916 
Alvin Daniel Mattson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Nils Ludvig Melander 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Arnold Gottfrid Nelson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1915 
Ernest Arvid Palm 

A.B., Augustana College, 1915 



Batavia 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chicago 

Springfield, Mass. 
St. Peter, Minn. 

Tacoma, Wash. 
Hastings, Minn. 
Houtzdale, Pa. 
Aneby, Sweden 
Cannon Falls, Minn. 
Titusville, Pa. 
Chicago 
Rockford 
Rock Island 
Lindsborg, Kans. 
Genoa, Nebr. 
Ashtabula, Ohio 
Gowrie, Iowa 
Manson, Iowa 
Duluth, Minn. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Ludington, Mich. 



College Catalog. 10. 



146 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Johan Pearson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Walter Fritiof Peterson 

A.B., Bethany College, 1916 
Carl Pontus Petersson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
Theodore Luther Rydback 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 
Edwin Johnson Vikman 

A.B., Augustana College, 1916 



Lockport 
Bertrand, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Denver, Colo. 
Rockford 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Carl Arthur Anderson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
Arthur Gottfrid Benson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
John Luther Benson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
Oscar William Bjorkquist 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1917 
Hjalmar Wilhelm Johnson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1917 
Gottfrid Lindau 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1917 
John Anderson Martin 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
Petrus Herbert Nordlander 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
Nels Emanuel Olson 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1917 
Nils Holger Pearson 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
John Nilson Steimer 

A.B., Augustana College, 1917 
John Waldemar Unis 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College, 1917 

HOSPITANTS 

SENIOR YEAR 

Gustav Albert Bjork 

MIDDLE YEAR 

Bernt Hakanson 

Charles August Strandberg 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 



Frank Albert Lenz 
Rev. Fred Gustav Olson 



East Tawas, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moorhead, Minn. 
Superior, Wis. 
Sweden 
Turlock, Cal. 
Rock Island 
Elbow Lake, Minn. 
Providence, R. I. 
Chicago 
Gresham, Oreg. 

India 

Eriksdale, Man., C. 
Potter, Nebr. 

Rock Island 
Moline 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 

THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 



147 



Class of '00 Rockford 



Class of '00 Red Oak, la. 



Class of '03 Holmes City, Minn 



POSTGRADUATES 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts 
Carl Ludvig Anderson, Grinnell College, Class of '14 Rock Island 

Major subject — Political Economy. 

Minor subject — Political Science. 
Marion Albert Andreen Class of '13 Chicago 

Major subject — Physics. 

Minor subject — Chemistry. 
Rev. John Alfred Benander 

Major subject — English. 

Minor subject — Swedish. 
Rev. Charles E. Bengtson 

Major subject — Sociology. 

Minor subject — Ancient History. 
Rev. Per Ernst Bergstrom 

Major subject — German. 

Minor subject — Swedish. 
Rev. Efraim Ceder Upsala College, Class of '10 Buenos Ayres, S. A. 

Major subject — History of Swedish Literature. 

Minor subject — History and Political Science. 
Mrs. Lois Smith Crann, Simpson College, Class of '06 Davenport, la. 

Major subject — English. 

Minor subject — Sociology. 
Rev. Edward Ekstrom Class of '10 Moline 

Major subject — Swedish Literature. 

Minor subject — Swedish Language. 
Rev. George Fahlund Class of '04 De Kalb 

Major subject — Ancient History. 

Minor subject — History. 
Rev. Frans Erik Wilhelm Kastman Class of '07 Ironwood, Mich. 

Major subject — Swedish. 

Minor subject — English. 
Rev. Joseph Walton Kempe Class of '14 Creston, Iowa 

Major subject — History. 

Minor subject — Political Science. 



Rev. Johan August Landin 

Major subject — Sociology. 

Minor subject — History. 
Karl Gottfrid Larson 

Major subject — Physics. 

Minor subject — Chemistry 



Class of '08 Chicago 



Class of '15 Rock Island 



148 



EOLL OF STUDENTS 



Johannes Emanuel Lindberg 
Lunds privata elementarlaroverk Class of '11 Rock Island 

Major subject — History of Philosophy. 

Minor subject — Philosophy of Religion. 
Gotthard Lindholm, G. A. College, Class of '13 Litchfield, Minn. 

Major subject — Physics. 

Minor subject — Geology. 
Mrs. Ellis Nilson 

Major subject — Psychology. 

Minor subject — History. 
Nelson Arthur Siegfrid Miller, U. of la 

Major subject — English Literature. 

Minor subject — English Language. 
Rev. Lawrence Fred. Nordstrom, Upsala, Class of 

Major subject — Sociology. 

Minor subject — Physiology. 
Rev. Sven Gustav Ohman, D. D 

Major subject — English. 

Minor subject — Swedish. 
Rev. Ernst Edwin Ryden 

Major subject — English. 

Minor subject — History. 
Julius Adam Reinemund 

Major subject — English Literature. 

Minor subject — Philosophy 
Theodore Luther Rydback Class of '16 Denver, Colo. 

Major subject — So-ciology. 

Minor subject: History. 
Oliver Leonard Troxell, Northw. College Class of '14 Litchfield, Minn 

Major subject — Pnilosophy of Education. 

Minor subject — Mathematics. 



Class of '11 Viborg, S. D. 



Class of '15 Warren, Minn. 



12 Port Richmond, 
New York, N. Y. 



Class of '15 New Britain, Conn. 



Class of '10, Jamestown, N. Y. 



Class of '11 Muscatine, Iowa 



RESIDENT GRADUATE 



Elmer Theodore Peterson, A. B. 



Rock Island. 



UNDERGRADUATES 



SENIOR CLASS 

Gerald Joseph Clarence Anderson Boxholm 

Harry Carl Anderson 

Laura Annette Anderson 

Esther Miriam Andreen 

Clarence Edward Bloomberg 

Blanche Mildred Carpenter 

Eunice Esther Christiansen 

Perle Irene Crone 



Iowa 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Ruthland 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



149 



Edna Eugenia Curry 
John David Ekstrom 
Vernon Alexis Ericson 
Simon Emanuel Fagerstrom 
Adolph Emil Theodore Fant 
Inez Marguerite Gull 
August Julius Johnson 
John Herman Johnson 
Reuben Paul Kron 
Paulus Herman Lange 
Anna Myrtle Otelia Larson 
Joseph Emanuel Land 
Helen Janet Miller 
Harry Edgar Olson 
Paul Victor Randolph 
Eva Velta Robb 
Clarence Oliver Samuelson 
Carl Axel Bernard Swanson 
Reuben Herman Waldschmidt 



Rock Island 
Del Valle, Texas 
Wakefield, Nebr. 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Ophiem 

Goodhue, Minn. 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Dayton, Iowa 
Lime Springs, Iowa 
Fairfield, Iowa 
Wahoo, Nebr. 
Somers, Wis. 
Winfield, Iowa 
Boone, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Mead, Nebr. 
Omaha, Nebr. 
Fond du Lac, Wis. 



Florence Mabel Anderson 
Margaret Catharine Anderson 
Oscar Fredrick Bohman 
Hazel Anderson Brashear 
Laurence Joel Eckstrom 
Robert William Erickson 
James Levi Fitzpatrick 
Louise Emelia Fivey 
Alice Marquerite Ford 
Carl Joseph Forsberg 
Fae Rebecca Hanna 
Gertrude Leona Jacobson 
Elmer Clarence Johnson 
Emil Johnson 
Hugo Christian Larson 
George Albert Magnuson 
Herbert Theodore Olander 
Wilbur Nathaniel Palmquist 
John Raoul Redstrom 
Maxine Smith 
Paul Philip Youngberg 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Wakefield, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Moline 

Worcester, Mass. 
Winburne, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Chicago 
Rock Island 
Geneseo 
Woodhull 
Kila, Sweden 
Rock Island 
Bronson, Minn. 
Mt. Jewett, Pa. 
Lawton, Iowa 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Moline 
Munson, Pa. 



Alvin Aimer 

William Axel Anderson 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

New London, Minn. 
Marinette, Wis. 



150 



EOLL OF STUDENTS 



Forrest Clifford Baumbach 
Florence Edna Bladel 
Gertrude Caroline Carlson 
Elsie Cornelia Collins 
Martin Emanuel Collins 
Roena Festella Darling 
Albert Eliason 
John Alfred Elson 
Frederick Clark Freytag 
Ida Albertina Johnson 
Van Emanuel Johnson 
Wallace Nathaniel Johnson 
Beulah Margaret Kerns 
Luther Philip Kron 
Johan Petrus Larson 
Amos Lundquist 
Marvin Harrison Lyon 
Maurice Leland Xordgren 
Elizabeth Olmsted 
Robert Ernst Olmsted 
Carl Ewald Palmer 
Alfred Bernhard Peterson 
Arthur Herman Peterson 
Eva Dorothy Peterson 
Esthena Johanna Randolph 
Enoch Xataniel Sanden 
Elsa Elizabeth Scharfenberg 
Katheryn Vivian Marie Schroder 
Blanche Linnell Searle 
Carl Wendell Sodergren 
Rudolph Bernard Stone 
Rudolph Julius Swanson 
Eric Herbert Wahlstrom 
Ruth Davidson Weed 
Goldie Bertha Weinrott 
Edna Erika Wilson 



Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Escanaba. Mich. 

Wakefield, Nebr. 

Essex. Iowa 

Rock Island 

Wahoo, Xebr. 

Cleveland. O. 

Reynolds 

Ludingtcn, Mich. 

Sioux City. Iowa 

Sioux City, Iowa 

Moline 

Dayton. Iowa 

Hudiksvall, Sweden 

East Moline 

Moline 

Galva 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Escanaba. Mich. 

Ogden, Iowa 

Rockford 

Moline 

Boone. Iowa 

Blidsberg. Sweden 

Bettendorf, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Rock Island 

Mc Keesport, Pa. 

Wahoo, Xebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Lake Citv, Minn. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Oscar Fridolf Emanuel Ahlenius 
Anton Winfield Amenoff 
Enoch Johnson Anselm 
Ralph Gustave Bengston 
Helmer Benson 
John Harold Benson 
Ruben Bergendoff 



Meadowlands. Minn. 

Altona 

Granville 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Philadelphia. Pa. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



151 



Mildred Hildegard lone Blomgren 

Charles Adolph Boehme 

Ernest Luther Carlson 

Inar Carlson 

LeRoy Carlson 

Raymond Leonard Carlson 

Mary Caroline Clark 

Oscar Emil Dahlquist 

Helen Blanche Dodson 

Edith Isabel Dopp 

Karl Emil Ekblad 

Harold John Evans 

Esther Linnea Forsberg 

Russel Franing 

Carl Arvid Fryxell 

Harlow Farwell Gaylord 

Victoria Gefvert 

Lillian Dorothy Gross 

Henning Leonard Hassel 

Rubert Amos Hull 

Edla Euvodia Hypse 

Arthur Rudolph Johnson 

Arvid Johnson 

Bernhard Olof Johnson 

Mauritz Joshua Johnson 

Myrtle Mable Johnson 

Victor Emanuel Johnson 

Ernest August Lack 

Elsie Marie Larson 

Madge Martin 

Peter Alfred Martinson 

Paul John Mattson 

Mary Alice Metzgar 

Sigrid Amelia Monell 

Margaret Sophia Musfeldt 

Elizabeth Nelson 

Elving Nelson 

Palmer Sigurd Nestander 

Gladys Hildur Hortensia Oakleaf 

Aron Reuben Oakleaf 

Elsie Alfreda Olson 

Hjalmar Olson 

Ellen Marea Palm 

Carl Melanchton Peterson 

Roger Oliver Peterson 



Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Rockford 

Geneva 

Thorsby, Alabama 

Preemption 

Rockford 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Sandwich 

Davenport, Iowa 

Patton, Pa. 

Milan 

Moline 

Moline 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rock Island 

Mayger, Ore. 

Wahoo, Nebr. 

Wakefield, Nebr. 

Manistee, Mich. 

Rockford 

Burea, Sweden 

Ottumwa, Iowa 

Alexis 

Montrose, S. D. 

Princeton 

Orion 

Centerville, Iowa 

Gowrie, Iowa 

Ray, N. D. 

Moline 

Merrill, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Chesterton, Ind. 

Moline 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Madrid, Iowa 

Madrid, Iowa 

Palmer, Iowa 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Ludington, Mich. 

Rockford 

Moline 



152 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Roland Otto Sala 
Franklin Harvey Sampson 
Harold Victor Sundberg 
Karl Emanuel Swanburg 
Myrtle Margaret Swanson 
Harry Franklyn Taylor 
Rexford Leigh. Van Alstyne 
Richard Ferguson Van Alstyne 
Florence Olivia Watson 
Myrtle Viola Caroline Wessel 
Selma Elizabeth Westerlin 
Hult Laurence Wilson 
Lewis Bender Wilson 
Ebba Sophia Youngberg 
Eugene Youngert 
Esther Victoria Younggren 



Rock Island 
Nichols, Iowa 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Waukegan 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Milan 
Milan 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Chicago 

Ironwood, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Munson, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Ridgway, Pa, 



SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED COLLEGE 



Bertha Maria Gunilla Anderson 

Gustav Fredrik Andree 

Alger t Anker 

Doris Anne DeMars 

Besse Winifred Elwell 

Benny Theodore Erholm 

Emma Hannah Elizabeth Fant 

Randolph Carter Farrar 

Martha Lynn Fortine 

Elmer Henning Fredrickson 

Mamie Melinda Johnson 

Uno Walter Lindberg 

Rose Evelyn Mansfield 

Veva Marley 

Marvin Charles McNeil 

Ruth. Eleanor Nelson 

Richard Odelberg 

Fred Gustaf Olson 

Irene Florence Vera Olson 

Esther Mathilda Petterson 

Frank Peterson 

HJIvy Helen Leonora Ryden 

Miriam Catharine Welch 

Curtis William Wiberg 

Earle John Wickstrom 

Maria Barbara Zwicker 



Denver, Colo. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Anacortes, Wash. 
Ophiem 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Lockport 
Cambridge 
Tarunefors, Finland 
Rock Island 
Kensington, Kansas 
Rock Island 
Lake City, Minn. 
Moline 
Moline 

Manistique, Mich. 
Elk Point, S. D. 
Gladstone, Mich. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Davenport, Iowa 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Rock Island 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 

THE ACADEMY 



15a 



FOURTH CLASS 



Melvin Edward Fulton Anderson 

Minnie Emelia Anderson 

Carl Gustaf Carlson 

George Henry Chase 

Harold Hass 

Axel Gunnar Holmstrom 

Lester Richard Horst 

Gustav Fredrick Luther Lindstrom 

Eugene Theodore Lothgren 

Victor August Walter Mennicke 

Carl Levi Nelson 

Arthur William Peterson 

THIRD 

Margaret Louise Franing 

Elmer Friedlund 

Grace Adina Johnson 

Per Oscar Theodore Johnson 

Anna Barbara Kempe 

Hermine Martha Kiessig 

Arthur Gustav Larson 

Carl Oscar Soderblom 

Albin Leonard Eugene Warnquist 



Lynn Center 
Elkhart, Ind. 
Hallefors, Sweden 
Moline 
Coal Valley 
Brainerd, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Jamestown, N. Y. 
Chicago 
Geneseo 

Jamestown, N. Y. 
Marathon, Iowa 

CLASS 

Rock Island 
Kingsburg, Calif. 
New Windsor 
Abbetorp, Sweden 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Rockford 
Galva 
Northport, Mich. 



Albert August Anderson 
Dwight Philip Andreen 
Gustav Strand Andreen 
Mabel Eleanor Arnell 
Esther Marie Erickson 
Thure Nathaniel Fagerstrom 
Arthur Edwin Haltmeyer 
Henry Gustav Hedlund 
Clara Dorothea Lange 
Anna Katheryn Leaf 
Hazel Irene Misner 
William Bernard Nissen 
Esther Louisa Nothstein 
Wilford Wesley Willing 

Albert Blake Briggs 
Delia Agnes Bump 



SECOND CLASS 

Kenora, Ont, Canada 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Lynn Center 

Jamestown, N. Y. 

Moline 

Detroit, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Milan 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

FIRST CLASS 

Davenport, Iowa 
Fulton 



154 



KOLL OF STUDENTS 



Signe Margaret Cathony 

John Elmer Dahlgren 

Henrietta Adeline Danielson 

Rollin Gustaf Engman 

Alfrida Hulda Ericson 

Gustav Elmer Freeburg 

Carl Philip Holmberg 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Helga Cicilia Johnson 

Samuel Francis Johnson 

John Nathaniel Leaf 

Harry William Theodore Lundberg 

Everett Munson 

Gerhard Engelbrekt Ohlsson 

Olaf Olson 

Ruth Evaline Ostrom 

Herbert Mauritz William Quist 

Max Gustav Rauer 

Pauline Augusta Scharfenberg 

Myrtle Seefeldt 

Laura Ruth Smith 

Mary Edith Tomlinson 

Walter Fredrick Young 



Lynn Center 

Gilbert, Mich. 

Lynn Center 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Hartford, Ct. 

Pomeroy, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Boras, Sweden 

Michigan City, Ind. 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Ft. Dodge, Iowa 

East Moline 

Malmo, Sweden 

Clearbrook, Minn. 

Woodhull 

Rockford 

Woodland, Wash. 

Bettendorf, Iowa 

Milan 

Davenport, Iowa 

Luverne, Minn. 

Paxton 



SPECIAL AND UNCLASSIFIED ACADEMY 



Hannah Constance Anderson 
Marie Anderson 
Alexander Bernstein 
Euphemia Margaret Billburg 
Barney Brotman 
Ruth Adelia Carlmark 
Hilma Mathilda Carlson 
Marie Christine Carlson 
Irene Sylvia Carstens 
Mildred Elizabeth Cheney 
Esther Jane Haywood 
Leona Haywood 
Ruth Nellie Helberg 
Thelma Paulina Helquist 
Dora Alvina Johnson 
Frank Oscar Johnson 
Linnea Jeannette Johnson 
Hazel Laughead 
Ebba Maria Leaf 
Edna Elizabeth Linderholm 



Antrim, Pa. 

Sodra Malen, Sweden 

Rhinelander, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Milan 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Mc Pherson, Kansas 

So. Bend, Ind. 

Marathon, Iowa 

Eau Claire, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Alexis 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Omaha, Nebr. 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



155 



Freda Elizabeth Mattson 
Laura Anna Miller 
Evelyn Mills 
Dorothy Marie Nelson 
Juvey Anna Lovisa Nelson 
Benjamin Edgar Peterson 
Elvera Elizabeth Peterson 
Nina Julia Pritchett 
Nancy Rosella Schibilla 
Dorothy Louise Schreiber 
Edla Amalia Swanson 
Florence Ullemeyer 
Mary Mildred Winter 



Osceola, Nebr. 
Maquoketa, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Cambridge 
Pomeroy, Iowa 
Bishop Hill 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 

Davenport, Iowa 
Warren, Pa. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 



Hilda Valborg Jacobson 



PREPARATORY 

Halmstad, 



Sweden 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL 



Laura Annette Anderson 
Myrtle May Armstrong 
Cora Belle Bean 
Clara Blakemore 
Ethel Lora Chapman 
Doris Anne DeMars 
Helen Blanche Dodson 
Irene Florence Dodson 
Clara Eckman 
Kathryn Cornelia Fuhr 
Hortense Linnea Granere 
Frances May Grove 
Lucretia Grove 
Lillian Hanson 
Julia Hintermeister 
Elmer Clarence Johnson 
Emmerence Johnson 
Vera McBurney 
Edna McCarthy 
Susan Marion McCurdy 
Gertrude Moody 
Ottelia Morley 
Dora Ellen Newton 
Inez Maria Payton 
Bernice Mae Resser 
Daisy Maria Simmon 
Edna Simmon 



Rock Island 

Milan 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Eureka, S. D. 

Illinois City 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Milan 

Taylor Ridge 

Woodhull 

Preemption 

Silvis 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Moline 

Milan 

Milan 



156 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Elma Rebecca Smith 
Grace Weatherhead 

Goldie Bertha Weinrott 
Frances Scott White 



Milan 
Moline 
Moline 
Davenport, Iowa 



CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 



PIANO 



Mary Louise Ainsworth 

Hannah Constance Anderson 

Helen Anderson 

Ingegard Maria Anderson 

Lillian Hildegard Anderson 

Luther Emanuel Anderson 

Pauline Anderson 

Nellie Dorothy Anthony 

Mabel Arnell 

James Wilson Bailey 

Lola Mae Barker 

Adeline Beaver 

Victor Emanuel Beck 

Harold Benzon 

Mildred Dorothea Benzon 

Laverne Bergendahl 

Carl Elver Bergquist 

Elaine Bergstrom 

Helen Lucile Blankenburg 

Barney Brotman 

Ruby Browning 

Arthur Paul Cameron 

Buel Gabriella Carlson 

Florence Carlson 

Hilma Mathilda Carlson 

LeRoy Carlson 

Mrs. Lulu S. Carr 

Mildred Elizabeth Cheney 

Elsie Cornelia Collins 

Aurelia Dennis 

Wilfred John Eiteman 

Arthur Emanuel Ekstrom 

John Alfred Elson 

June Evans 

Nellie Letitia Faust 

Nellie Florin 



Moline 

Antrim, Pa. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Orion 

Swedona 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Orion 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Rock Island 

St. James, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Geneva 

Moline 

Milan 

Wakefield, Nebr 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Cleveland, O. 

Moline 

Moline 

Carbon Cliff 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



157 



Marie Duncan Freytag 

Evelyn Handell 

Francis Hanson 

Esther Jane Haywood 

Leona Hamer Haywood 

Adeline Hawkinson 

Thelma Pauline Helquist 

Mary Herman 

Elmer Julius Holt 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Emelia Anna Johnson 

Dora Alvina Johnson 

Frances Johnson 

Hjalmar Wilhelm Johnson 

John Herman Johnson 

Laura Johnson 

Ruth Johnson 

Esther Vivian Johnston 

Henry Calvin Johnston 

Minnie Lucille Kleuver 

Carl Elwood Kraft 

Charlotte Kuschmann 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Marie Lewis 

Edna Elizabeth Linderholm 

Wava Lindstrom 

Eugene Theodore Lothgren 

Norma Magnusson 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Valera Sophia Meyer 

Mrs. Laura Miller 

Evelyn Mills 

Raymond Percy McAllister 

Marvin Charles McNeill 

Julia Amelia Moller 

Dorothy Marie Nelson 

Juvey Anna Nelson 

May Wilhelmina Nelson 

Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Violet Nelson 

Alix Olchoff 

Elizabeth Olmsted 

Adele Eugenia Olson 

Esther Mildred Olson 

Irene Florence Olson 



Reynolds 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

South Bend, Ind. 

Rock Island 

Bridgeport, Kansas 

Rock Island 

Bettendorf, Iowa 

Marathon, Iowa 

Moline 

Superior, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Hampton 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Rock Island 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Sherrard 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Eagle, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Cambridge 

Pomeroy, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Manistique, Mich. 



158 



ROLL OF STTDENTS 



Margaret Olson 
Selma Olson 

Anna Florentine Peterson 
Vera Elizabeth Peterson 
Viola Jeannette Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Anna Frances Pierson 
Bertha Caroline Ramquist 
Hilvy Helen Leonora Ryden 
Sonja Sandahl 
Dorothy Schreiber 
Laura Ruth Smith 
Marion Sohner 
Mrs. H. O. Spencer 
Ardes Stock 
Helen Beryl Swingle 
Pearl Alice Vetter 
Regina Adeline Wengert 
Edna Erika Wilson 
Mrs. Edw. Clyde Wilson 
Laura Frances Woodbum 
Edith Maria Wright 
Ruth Elizabeth Wyman 
Esther Younggren 



Moline 

Mo line 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Rock Island 

Colerdine, Minn. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Moline 

Davenport, Iowa 

Davenport, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Grand Mound, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Lake City, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Hillsdale 

Moline 

Moline 

Ridgway, Pa. 



VOICE 



Oscar Emanuel Ahlenius 
Carl Arthur Anderson 
Pauline Anderson 
Carl August Bengston 
Ralph Gustave Bengston 
Carl Samuel Berggren 
Wilhelm Rudolph Bergh 
Carl Oscar Bostrom 
Hilma Carlson 
Ruth Carlson 
Irene Sylvia Carstens 
Oscar Emanuel Clausen 
Arthur Emanuel Ekstrom 
Mary Franing 
Thelma Paulina Helquist 
Esther Huber 
Gertrude Leona Jacobson 
Lillian Wilma Jensen 
Bert Marcus Johnson 
Dora Alvina Johnson 



Meadowlands, Minn. 
East Tawas, Mich. 
Swedona 
Longmont, Colo. 
Rock Island 
Moline 

West Moshannon, Pa. 
Portland, Conn. 
Holdrege, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Davenport, Iowa 
Cannon Falls, Minn. 
Osceola, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
South Bend, Ind. 
Moline 
Geneseo 
Rock Island 
Monmouth 
Marathon, Iowa 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



159 



Elmer Clarence Johnson 
John Herman Johnson 
Mildred Johnson 
Mrs. Olivia Kopp 
Luther Philip Kron 
Gotfrid Lindau 
Albin Lindgren 
Dorothy Marie Nelson 
Juvey Anna Nelson 
Ruth Eleanor Nelson 
Elsie Alfreda Olson 
Irene Florence Olson 
Nancy Olson 
Ernest Arvid Palm 
Eric Leonard Pearson 
Vera Elizabeth Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Leona Sandahl 
Elza Elizabeth Scharfenberg 
Charlotte Schnathorst 
Irene Streed 
Richard Van Alstyne 
Pearl Alice Vetter 
Albin Leonard Warnquist 
Miriam Catherine Welch 
Esther Younggren 
Grace Wood 



Woodhull 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Dayton, Iowa 

Nye, Wis. 

Lindstrom, Minn. 

Cambridge 

Pomeroy, Iowa 

Lake City, Minn. 

Palmer, Iowa 

Manistique, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Ludington, Mich. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Lynn Center 

Bettendorf, Iowa 

Moline 

Moline 

Milan 

Grand Mound, Iowa 

^Jorthport, Mich. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Ridgway, Pa. 

Rock Island 



ORGAN 



Pauline Anderson 
Etta Margaret Bailey 
Hilma Mathilda Carlson 
LeRoy Carlson 
Irene Sylvia Carsten 
Gertrude Belle Dusenberry 
Lydia Wilhelmina Johnson 
Mrs. Myrtle Lee 
Freda Elizabeth Mattson 
Juvey Anna Nelson 
Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 
Ruth Eleanor Nelson 
Palmer Sigurd Nestrander 
Bertha Caroline Ramquist 
Franklin Harvey Sampson 
Harry Franklyn Taylor 



Swedona 

Orion 

Holdrege, Nebr. 

Geneva 

Davenport, Iowa 

Orion 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Pomeroy, Iowa 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Colerdine, Minn 

Nichols 

Rock Island 



160 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



VIOLIN 



Gustav Strand Andreen 
Carl Fridolf Bergstrom 
Alexander Bernstein 
Louise Kathrine Bolin 
Marguerite Burke 
Allden Eugene Burton 
Frances Maude Dunham 
Nellie Letitia Florin 
Elizabeth Christine Gaylord 
Leona Hamer Haywood 
Genevieve Wood Hunt 
Edla Euvodia Hypse 
Orville Wyberg Jensen 
Jessie Evelyn Johnson 
Kenneth Stempel Kempe 
Karl Kirkman 
Irene Larrison 
Philip Liccata 
Wava Lind strom 
Edwin Lipton 
Veva Marley 
Richard Maxwell 
Nils Ludvig Melander 
Arthur Stowell Musson 
Mary Catherine Paul 
Huldah Eunice Peterson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Thelma Katherine Stegeman 



Rock Island 
Moline 

Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Carbon Cliff 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 

Wakefield, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Cambridge 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Sherrard 
Preemption 
Kensington, Kansas 
Hampton 
Duluth, Minn. 
Moline 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Orion 
Rock Island 



Blanche Ehler 
Esther Jane Haywood 
Anna Kathryn Leaf 



CELLO 



Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 



Ingegard Maria Anderson 
Enoch Johnson Anselm 
Mabel Arnell 
Lola Mae Barker 
Alexander Bernstein 
Barney Brotman 
Ruth Adelia Carlmark 
Hilma Mathilda Carlson 
Le Roy Carlson 



THEORY 

Rock Island 
Granville 
Rock Island 
Maquoketa, Iowa 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rock Island 
Moline 

Holdrege, Xebr. 
Geneva 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



161 



Mildred Elizabeth Cheney 

Aurelia Dennis 

Ture Vergilius Anselm Ferm 

Marie Duncan Freytag 

Leona Hamer Haywood 

Thelma Pauline Helquist 

Lillian Wilma Catherine Jensen 

Dora Alvina Johnson 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Edna Elizabeth Linderholm 

Wava Lindstrom 

Veva Marley 

Freda Elizabeth Mattson 

Marvin Charles McNeil 

Mrs. Laura Miller 

Evelyn Mills 

Dorothy Marie Nelson 

Juvey Anna Nelson 

Mildred Elizabeth Nelson 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Elizabeth Olmsted 

Irene Florence Olson 

Hjalmar Olson 

Anna Florentine Peterson 

Huldah Eunice Peterson 

Vera Elizabeth Peterson 

Esther Mathilda Petterson 

Bertha Caroline Ramquist 

Paul Victor Randolph 

Edna Erika Wilson 

Laura Frances Woodburn 

Esther Younggren 



Milan 

Davenport, Iowa 

Chicago 

Reynolds 

Rock Island 

So. Bend, Ind. 

Rock Island 

Marathon, Iowa 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Sherrard 

Kensington, Kansas 

Osceola, Nebr. 

Rock Island 

Maquoketa, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Cambridge 

Pomeroy, Iowa 

Chicago 

Lake City, Minn. 

Rock Island 

Manistique, Mich. 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Davenport, Iowa 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Colerdine, Minn. 

Boone, Iowa 

Lake City, Minn. 

Hillsdale 

Ridgway, Pa. 



SCHOOL OF ART 



Florence Mabel Anderson 

Minnie Anderson 

Paul LeRoy Anderson 

William Axel Anderson 

Enoch Johnson Anselm 

Vera Bengston 

Allan James Bennett 

Alexander Bernstein 

Mildred Hildegard lone Blomgren 



Wakefield, Nebr. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Marinette, Wis. 
Granville 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rhinelander, Wis. 
Rock Island 



College Catalog. 11. 



162 



ROLL OF STUDENTS 



Charles Adolph Boehme 

Vernon Alexis Ericson 

Effie Farrell 

Carl Joseph Forsberg 

Inez Marquerite Gull 

Ruth Nellie Helberg 

Grace Adina Johnson 

Per Oscar Johnson 

Luther Philip Kron 

Ebba Maria Leaf 

Anna Sophia Malmberg 

Victor August Walter Mennicke 

Ruth Eleanor Nelson 

Irene Florence Olson 

Roland Otto Sala 

Blanche Linnell Searle 

Eunice Quigley Squire 

Harold Sundberg 

Gilbert Carl Swanson 

Rudolph Julius Swanson 

Reuben Herman Waldschmidt 

Albin Leonard Eugene Warnquist 

Florence Olivia Watson 

Miriam Catherine Welch 

Walter Fredrick Young 

Ebba Sophia Youngberg 

Paul Philip Youngberg 



Rock Island 

Wakefield, Nebr 

Silvis 

Chicago 

Goodhue, Minn. 

Kansas City, Mo. 

New Windsor 

Chicago 

Dayton, Iowa 

Tennessee Ridge, Tenn. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Geneseo 

Lake City, Minn. 

Manistique, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Geneseo 

Rock Island 

St. Paul, Minn. 

Cambridge 

Wahoo, Nebr. 

Fond du Lac, Wis. 

Northport, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Paxton 

Munson, Pa. 

Munson, Pa. 



SCHOOL OF ELOCUTION 



Mabel Arnell 
John Luther Benson 
Clara Priscilla Blakemore 
Mildred Elizabeth Cheney 
Dorothy Eberhardt 
Mrs. Fay Gregg 
Dora Alvina Johnson 
Grace Adina Johnson 
Helen Amelia Kocher 
Mrs. Maud Kramer 
Mrs. Mabel Kuschmann 
Harry Albert Kuschmann 
Anna Myrtle Otelia Larson 
Veva Marley 
Everett Munson 



PRIVATE PUPILS 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Milan 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Marathon, Iowa 
New Windsor 
Elgin 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Fairfield, Iowa 
Kensington, Kans. 
East Moline 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



163 



Ruth Eleanor Nelson 
Ruth Evaline Ostrom 
Carl Oscar Soderblom 
Lydia Elvira Stenborg 
Florence Olivia Swanson 
Margary Walker 
Goldie Bertha Weinrott 
Mrs. S. M. Wilson 



Lake City, Minn. 

Woodhull 

Sjotorp, Stenberga, Sweden 

Chisago City, Minn. 

Altona 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Rock Island 



COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT 



GRADUATE ACCOUNTANT COURSE 



Mabel Elin Bergquist 

Euphemia Margaret Billburg 

Delia Bump 

Prescott Rodman Brunstrum 

Clarence Victor Carlson 

Ernest Carlson 

Inar Carlson 

Dorris DeMars 

Arthur Emanuel Ekstrom 

Albert Eliason 

Rollin Engman 

Alfreda Ericson 

Emma Hannah Elizabeth Fant 

Elmer Henning Fredrickson 

Florence Marie Goemble 

Esther Haywood 

Ruth Helberg, 

Philip Holmberg 

Luther Jonas Andreas Idstrom 

Hilda Valborg Jacobson 

Bert Marcus Johnson 

Carl Emil Oliver Johnson 

Carl Malcom Johnson 

Edith Margaret Johnson 

Frank Oscar Johnson 

Helga Johnson 

Paul Ephraim Johnson 

Verner Johnson 

Barbara Kempe 

Dorothy Alberta Kurz 

Veva Marley 

Harold Russel Moffett 



Ironwood, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Fulton 
Moline. 
Rock Island 
Omaha, Neb. 
Rockford 
Evanston 
Osceola, Neb. 
Wahoo, Neb. 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Ophiem 
Lockport 
Geneseo 
Rock Island 
Kansas City, Kans. 
Pomeroy, Iowa 
Hibbing, Minn. 
Rock Island 
Monmouth 
Pocahontas, Iowa 
Fonda, Iowa 
Rock Island 
Eau Claire, Wis. 
Boras, Sweden 
Ogden, Iowa 
Ludington, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Kensington, Kans. 
Milan 



164 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



Everett Munson 

Margaret Musfeldt 

Elving Nelson 

William Bernard Nissen 

Carl Arthur Olson 

Harry Edgar Olson 

Tillie Hannah Olson 

Meredith Louis Ostrom 

Ellen Palm 

Benjamin E. Peterson 

Mabel Emma Carolyn Peterson 

Ruben Efraim Peterson 

Winifred Verginia Reck 

Charlotte Schnathorst 

Herman Alfred Schneyer 

Roy Verne Stephenson 

Oliver Emil Strandberg 

Karl Axel Swanson 

Karl Edward Swanson 

Marion Charlotte Swanson 

Earl Wickstrom 

Louis B. Wilson 



East Moline 
Rock Island 
Moline 
Rock Island 
Palmer, Iowa 
Winfield, Iowa 
Gladstone, Mich. 
Rock Island 
Ludington, Mich. 
Bishop Hill 
Oakland, Neb. 
Ogden, Iowa 
Sebring, Fla. 
Moline 

Bloomington, Wis. 
Dayton, Iowa 
Oneida 

Omaha, Nebr. 
North Henderson 
Chicago 
Oakland, Nebr. 
Rock Island 



STENOGRAPHIC COURSE 



Clarence Ivan Anderson 
Hulda Marie Anderson 
Laura Anette Anderson 
Margaret C. Anderson 
Violet Louise Anderson 
Mabel Elin Bergquist 
Euphemia Margaret Billburg 
Thelma Ida Burridge 
Clarence Victor Carlson 
Gertrude Caroline Carlson 
Blanche Mildred Carpenter 
Dorothy Una Cramer 
Edna Eugenia Curry 
Rollin Engman 
Signa Sophia Erickson 
June Blossom Evans 
Emma Hannah Elizabeth Fant 
Louise Emelia Fivey 
Linnea Forsberg 
Elmer Henning Fredrickson 
Florence Marie Goemble 
Marie Grothus 



Reynolds 

Orion 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Ironwood, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Erie 

Rock Island 

Escanaba, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Wausau, Wis. 

Moline 

Ophiem 

Rock Island 

Patton, Pa. 

Lockport 

Geneseo 

Rock Island 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



165 



Harold Hass 
Esther Alfreda Hegburg 
Ruth Helberg 
Ida A. Johnson 
Linnea Jennette Johnson 
Verner Johnson 
Andorra Larson 
Arthur Gustav Larson 
Helen Iva Lattin 
Hazel Laughead 
Edna Linderholm 
Helen Adams McKahin 
Rose Evelyn Mansfield 
Madge Martin 
Amelia Sigrid Monell 
Edna Marie Ohlweiler* 
Harry Edgar Olson 
Tillie Hannah Olson 
Meredith Louis Ostrom 
Ruth Evaline Ostrom 
William W. Pahl 
Ruth Louise Palmer 
Elvera Matilda Pearson 
Esther Mathilda Petterson 
Nina Julia Pritchett 
Anne Rahn 

Winifred Verginia Reck 
Alvin A. Rude 
Florence Irene Rude 
Hilvy Helen Lenora Ryden 
Nancy Rosella Schibilla 
Charlotte Schnathorst 
Cecile Schulze 
Lydia Elvira Marie Stenborg 
Oliver Emil Strandberg 
Mabel Christina Swanson 
Marion Charlotte Swanson 
Maud Ethel Swanson 
Florence Ullemeyer 
Anna Emily Verne 
Fred Ralph Wessman 
Selma Elizabeth Westerlin 
Charlotte Elizabeth Wheelan 
Mildred Mary Winter 
Esther Victoria Younggren 
Maria Barbara Zwicker 
* Deceased Jan. 9, 1918. 



Milan 

Moline 

Kansas City, Kans. 

Ludington, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Ludington, Mich. 

Moline 

Rockford 

Rock Island 

Alexis 

Omaha, Nebr. 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Centerville, Iowa 

Merrill, Wis. 

Rock Island 

Winfield, Iowa 

Gladstone, Mich. 

Rock Island 

Woodhull 

Rock Island 

Galva 

Centerville, Iowa 

Elk Point, S. D. 

Rock Island 

Davenport, Iowa 

Sebring, Fla. 

Pocahontas, Iowa 

Pocahontes, Iowa 

Kansas City, Kans. 

Moline 

Moline 

Moline 

Center City, Minn. 

Oneida 

Rock Island 

Chicago 

Moline 

Rock Island 

Moline 

Red Oak, Iowa 

Chicago 

Rock Island 

Rock Island 

Ridgway, Pa. 

Rock Island 



166 



BOLL OF STUDENTS 



ADDENDA 



Mrs. A. R. Mills 
Laura Shay 



SPECIAL ACADEMY 

Rock Island 
Carbon Cliff 



Birger Swanson, II Academy 



Chicago 



SUMMER SCHOOL — ACADEMY 



Elsie Gertrude Hollister 
Elsie Kroeger 
Almira White Tolman 
Mrs. Dacie Williams 



Port Byron 
Davenport, Iowa 
Port Byron 
Rock Island 



Myrtle Enberg 
Amy Granlund 
Carl Oscar Andreen 
Bell Jaffe 
Selma Ede 



CONSERVATORY 

Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Rock Island 
Moline 



SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT 167 



SUMMARY OF ENROLMENT 



2 


23 




1 


10 


27 


8 


21 


15 


38 


24 


68 


14 


26 



1917—1918 
Theological Seminary: 

MALE FEMALE TOTAL 

Postgraduates 23 

Undergraduates 62 

Special Hospitants 5 

90 
Collegiate Department: 

Postgraduates 21 

Resident Graduates 1 

Seniors 17 

Juniors 13 

Sophomores 23 

Freshmen 44 

Special and Unclassified 12 

131 73 204 

Academic Department: 

Fourth Class 10 

Third Class 5 

Second Class 9 

First Class 14 

Special and Unclassified 5 

43 53 96 

Preparatory Department 

Summer School 2 

Conservatory of Music 58 

School of Art 19 

School of Elocution 4 

Commercial Department 37 

Net Total* 316 284 600 



2 


12 


4 


9 


6 


15 


11 


25 


30 


35 



1 


1 


33 


35 


127 


185 


17 


36 


19 


23 


69 


106 



* After deducting for those counted more than once. 



168 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN U. S. SERVICE 



STUDENTS 
Now Serving in U. S. Army or Navy During the War. 



Arthur Almquist 

Albin A. Anderson 

August Samuel Anderson 

Carl Anderson 

C. F. Anderson 

Carl Ivar Anderson 

C. W. Anderson 

David E. Anderson 

Edgar Anderson 

Edwin Ferdinand Anderson 

Hilding Anderson 

Joel Anderson 

John William Anderson 

Melvin E. F. Anderson 

Roscoe Anderson 

Roy Anderson 

Clarence Anderson 

Marion Andreen 

George Anselm 

Frank Applegren 

Raymond Asplund 

Will Aster 

Oscar Bohman 

George Baker 

Fred Berg 

Hjalmar Bergh 

David B. Bergquist 

Sven Bersell 

Carol Bjorkman 

Conrad Bjorkman 

Lee Bladel 

Maurice Bloomberg 

Charles A. Boehme 

Noble Brewer 

Verne Brinkerhoff 

Earl Brodd 

Arthur Brunell 

Philip Bruner 

Anton J. Carlson (Prof.) 

Caesar T. G. Carlson 

Edwall Carlson 

Edward J. Carlson 



Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

In France 

Camp Grant, 111. 

Ft. Slocum, N. Y. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

In France 

Ellington Field, Houston, Texas 

Medical Reserve, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Camp Shelby, Hattiesburg, Miss. 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

In France 

Commonwealth Pier, Boston, Mass. 

Camp MacArthur, Waco, Texas 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Medical Reserve Corps, Chicago, 111. 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Fort Adams, Rhode Island 

Coast Artillery 

Camp Joseph Johnson, Jacksonville, 111. 

Ft. Rosecrans, San Diego, Calif. 

In France 

Great Lakes Training Station 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

Greenville, So. Carolina 

American Expeditionary Force 

American Expeditionary Force 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Ft. Rosecrans, Calif. 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Camp Custer, Mich. 

U. S. S. M. A., Champaigne, 111. 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Army Medical School, Washington, D. C. 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Ft. Rosecrans, Calif. 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN IT. S. SERVICE 



169 



Ivar Carlson 
Herbert Carlson 
Lawrence Carlson 
Martin Carlson 
Roger Carlson 
Victoria Carlson 
J. W. Carlstedt 
Richard Carter 
Ferdinand A. Cederberg 
J. E. Chester (Rev.) 
Howard Cooper 
Martin Cornell 
Reeffe Crakes 
Martin C. Dahlberg 
Allen Eddy 
Lawrence Eckstrom 
Larned Eklund 
Albert Eliason 
Alexander Elmblad 
Carl C. Enebuske 
Clarence Englund 
Knute Erickson 
Karl Erickson 
Rudolph Erickson 
Eben Forsling 
Edmund Fredrickson 
Carl Freemen 
Fred Freytag 
Albert Fryer 
Hjalmar Fryxell 
Ben Gest 
Hugo Gibson 
Harold Godehn 
Ruel Godehn 
Charles Goff 
Carl Gustafson 
Rudolph Hanson 
A. R. Hedstrom (Rev.) 
Henning Hill 
Eric 0. Holmgrain 
Frank Holmgren 
Harry Hull 
Rupert Hull 
Nathaniel Hultgren 
Paul Hult 



Great Lakes Naval Station 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Ft. Rosecrans, Calif. 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Army Base Hospital, Ft. Riley, Kans. 

Ft. Rosecrans, San Diego, Calif. 

Fort Sam Houston, Texas 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Chaplain, 53rd Infantry, Camp Forest, Ga. 

American Expeditionary Force 

Camp Logan, Houston, Texas 

Camp Bradley, Peoria, 111. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Aviation, Cambridge, Mass. 

American Expeditionary Force 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

In France 

Post Hospital Barracks, Key West, Fla. 

Naval Reserve 

Ft. Ogelthorpe, Ga. 

Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

In France 

Norfolk, Va. 

Camp Lowden, 111. 

American Expeditionary Force 

In France 

American Expeditionary Force 

Camp Logan, Texas 

In France 

Aviation Corps, Waco, Texas 

Camp Meade, Officers Training Camp 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Chaplain, 1st Engineers, France 

Medical Reserve Corps, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Pike, Ark. 

American Expeditionary Force 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Nichols, New Orleans, La. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 



170 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN U. S. SERVICE 



Verne Jacobson 
Arthur T. Johnson 
Arvid Johnson 
Luther Johnson 
August Julius Johnson 
Carl Edwin Johnson 
Clifford Johnson 
C. W. L. Johnson 
Edgar Johnson 
Edwin Johnson 
Emil Julius Johnson 
Eskil Johnson 
Franklin Johnson 
J. Emil L. Johnson 
Karl Johnson 
Paul Johnson 
Victor Johnson 
Bernhard Kallin 
C. H. Kalquist 
Leonard Kendall 
Cecil Kock 
Egner Larsen 
Einar Larson 
William Larson 
Theo. Lenz 
Carl Lindahl 
J. O. Lindquist (Rev.) 
Alvin Lugn 
Sven J. Lund 
Wilbert Lundahl 
Elliot Lundberg 
Lawrence D. Lundberg 
Joel Lundquist 
Robt. McDonald 
Herbert Magney 
Luther Malmberg (Rev.) 
Ed. Meek 
Harland M. Mills 
Willis Milspaw 
Arthur Molander 
Anders Nelson 
Byron Nelson 
Edmund Nelson 
Gunnar Nelson 
John Elmer Nelson 



U. S. Marines 

Aerial Service, A. E. F. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Coast Artillery, Calif. 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Fort Worden, Wash. 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Great Lakes Training Station 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

U. S. M. C, New York 

Camp Travis, Texas 

Camp Bradley, 111. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Great Lakes Training Station 

Marine Corps 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Washington, D. C. 

Aviation Corps 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Chaplain, 43rd Infantry, New Orleans, La. 

Naval Reserve 

Aero Supply Squadron, Long Island, N. Y. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Camp Lowden (Summer of 1917) 

Chaplain, 350th Infantry, Camp Dodge, la. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Ft. Benjamin, Harrison, Ind. 

Camp Grant, 111. 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Field Artillery, Quantico, Va. 

Rainbow Division, France 

In France 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN T7. S. SEEVICE 



171 



Oscar Nelson 
Paul R. Nestler 
Thor Norberg 
Elmer Oberg 
Chester B. Olson 
Earl Olson 
Otto Olson 
Rudolph L. J. Olson 
Reuben Palmer 
George A. Paulson 
John A. Paulson 
Paul Pearson 
Robert Poison 
Arthur H. Peterson 
Roger Peterson 
P. A. Reinertsen 
Oden P. Rovelstad 
Arthur Rudelius 
Theo. Rydback 
Erwin Sailer 
Clarence Samuelson 
Walter Samuelson 
Joel Seedoff 
W. W. Scott 
Paul Seitz 
Reuben Silas 
Carl Sodergren 
Harold Speidel 
Rudolph Swanbeck 
Rudolph Stone 
Benjamin A. Swanson 
Carl A. Swanson 
Elmer Swanson 
Emil A. Swanson 
Arthur Swedberg 
Edd Swedberg 
Birger Swenson 
Irwin Swenson 
Perry Taber 
Martin J. Telleen 
Carl Tiedemann 
David Thompson 
Glenn Trevor 
Clarence Trued 
Martin Trued 



Madison, Wis. 

Camp Greene, Charlotte, N. C. 

U. S. N. Training Station 

Camp Grant, 111. 

Camp Houston, Texas 

Waterloo, Iowa 

Camp Punston, Kans. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Custer, Battle Creek, Mich. 

Allentown, Pa. 

Camp Lewis, Wash. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Mo. 

In France 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Sherman, Chillicothe, Ohio 

U. S. S. Pensacola 

Camp Lowden (Summer of 1917) 

Camp Stanley, Texas 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Key West, Fla. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Great Lakes Naval Training Station 

Camp Donaphin, Ft. Sill, Okla. 

Naval Station, Marine Barracks, Guam. 

"Tank" Service, In France 

Ft. Riley, Kans. 

Camp Lowden (Summer of 1917) 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Ft. Rosecrans, San Diego, Calif. 

Camp Stanley, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Director Red Cross, Chillicothe, Ohio 

U. S. Expeditionary Force, France 

Aviation Corps, Austin, Texas 

Artillery, Quantico, Va. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Logan, Texas 



172 



STUDENTS ENROLLED IN U. S. SERVICE 



A. D. Udden (Prof.) 
Svante Udden 
Luther Valentine 
Richard Van Alstyne 
Donald Vance 
Lennart Villberg 
Leo Wagner 
Raymond Walker 
Hammond W. Whitsitt 
Curtis Wiberg 
Raymond Wilson 
George Wissing 
Joe Youngstrom 



Aviat. Corps, Weather Bureau, Waco, Tex. 

Army Aviation School, Univ. of Texas 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

Great Lakes Naval Station 

Camp Grant, 111. 

Camp Custer, Mich. 

Hospital Corps, Great Lakes, 111. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Rock Island Arsenal 

Camp Funston, Kans. 

Camp Cody, Deming, N. Mex. 

Camp Logan, Texas 

Camp Lewis, Wash. (Fall, 1917) 



Army Camp Pastors and Y. M. C. A. Workers. 



Paul Harold Andreen 
Rev. Emil F. Bergren 
Rev. Hugo Haterius 
Rev. C. E. Hoffsten 
Rev. Nels Lundgren 
Clifford Olson 
Rev. E. E. Ryden 
G. H. Ryden 
Herbert F. Schersten 
Rev. P. N. Sjogren 
Rev. Walter Tillberg 



Army Y.M.C.A.,Camp Grant, 111. (Fall,1917) 

General Hospital No. 4, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Camp Bowie, Texas 

Camp Grant, 111. 

Fort Snelling, Minn. 

Army Y. M. C. A. 

Camp Wadsworth, S. C. 

Army Y. M. C. A. 

Army Y. M. C. A. 

Camp Dodge, Iowa 

Camp Logan, Texas 



INDEX 



173 



INDEX 



Academic Department, 12, 16, 20. 
Adelphic Society, 117. 
Admission, College and Academy, 

General Requirements, 16. 

On Certificate, 18. 

Into the Seminary, 54. 
Advanced Credits, 18. 
Aid Fund, 128. 
Alumni Association, 127. 
Appointments, Committee on, 9. 
Archives, 114. 
Art School, 90. 
Athletic Association, 121. 
Athletics, 120. 
Augustana Prohib. League, 121. 

Band, 122. 
Bible Society, 121. 
Biological Laboratory, 114. 
Board of Control: 

Of Athletics, 9. 

Of Forensics, 9, 119. 

Of Public Meetings, 9. 
Board of Directors, 4. 
Board and Room, 107. 
Bookkeeping, 96. 
Buildings, 130. 

Calendars: 

Academy, College and Semi- 
nary, 3. 

Commercial Department, 3. 

Conservatory, 70. 
Charter, 132. 
Christianity, 18. 
Clef Club, 125. 

Collegiate Department, 12, 14 ff. 
Collegiate Faculty, 14, 15. 
Commercial Department: 

Faculty, 94. 

General Statement, 94. 
Committees, Standing, 9, 10. 
Concordia Society, 118. 
Conservatory of Music, 70. 
Courses of Instruction: 

Preparatory, Academy, College, 
25. 

Theological Seminary, 54. 

Conservatory, 78. 

Commercial Department, 95 ff. 



Courses of Study: 

Preparatory and Academy, 20 ff. 

College, 22 ff. 

Normal, 49, 50. 

Seminary, 56. 

Postgraduate, in College, 51. 

Postgraduate, in Seminary, 62. 

Conservatory, 72. 

Commercial Department, 95 ff. 

School of Art, 90. 

Elocution, 92, 93. 

Select, 18. 
Credits, Advanced, 18. 
Curator of Archives, 9, 114. 

Debating Clubs, 119. 

Debating League, 120. 

Degrees, Diplomas, and Graduates 

for 1917, 138 ff. 
Denkmann Memorial Library, 109 

ff., 131. 
Departments and Courses: 

Preparatory, 12, 20. 

Academic, 12, 20 ff. 

Collegiate, 12, 21 ff. 

Normal, 12, 49. 

Theological, 12, 54 ff. 

Conservatory, 12, 170 ff. 

Commercial, 13, 92. 

Art, 12, 90. 

Elocution, 13, 92. 
Diplomas, 49, 52, 68, 73, 104. 

Elective Units, 16, 17. 
Elocution, 92, 93. 
Endowment Fund Society, 126. 
Enrolment, Regulations, 18. 
Enrolment, Summary, 167. 
Ethnographical Collection, 114. 
Executive Committee of Board, 4. 
Examinations in Music, 87. 
Expenses: 

Board and Room, 107. 

Fees, 107, 108. 

Tuition. See Sub Tuition. 

Faculties : 
General, 5 ff. 
Collegiate, 14, 15. 
Seminary, 54. 



174 



INDEX 



Conservatory, 70. 
Commercial, 94. 
Foreign Mission Society, 117. 

General Information, 107, (Cons.) 

87. 
Graduation, 21, 49, 56, 73, 104. 
Groups of Studies, 21 — 25. 
Gymnastics, General, 120. 



Reading Room, 109. 
Registrar, 10. 
Roll of Students, 143 ff. 
Roll of Students in Army or Navy, 

171. 
Rules and Regulations: 

Academy and College, 52. 

Seminary, 68. 

Conservatory, 87. 



Handel Oratorio Society, 123. 
Historical Collections, 114. 
Historical Sketch, 134. 

Iduna Society, 119. 
Information, General, 106. 

Laboratories, 114. 

Ladies' Hall, 108. 

Library and Reading Room, 109 ff. 

Location and Buildings, 130. 

Luther Bible Society, 121. 

Lyceum, 118. 

Matriculation in the Seminary, 54. 

Matron, 10. 

Mission Society, 117. 

Museum, 113. 

Musical Organizations, 122. 

Normal Department, 49. 

Observer, Augustana, 116. 

Officers of the Board, 4. 

Omcers and Standing Committees, 

9, 10. 
Olov Rudbeck, 119. 
Oratorio Society, 123. 
Orchestra. 122. 
Organ, Course in 81. 
Oriole Ladies' Chorus, 126. 



Scholarships, 129 ff. 
School of Art, 12, 90. 
Secretary: 

General Faculty, 9. 

College Faculty, 9. 

Theological Faculty, 9. 

Conservatory Faculty, 9. 

Commercial Faculty, 9. 
Select Courses, 18. 
Seminary, 55 ff. 
Seminary Dormitory Fund, 131. 
Shorthand, See Stenography, 101. 
Societies: 

Adelphic, 117. 

Augustana For. Mission, 117. 

Augustana Endow, Fund, 126. 

Concordia, 118. 

Debating Societies, 119. 

Iduna, 119. 

Olov Rudbeck, 119. 

Phrenokosmian, 117. 

Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 

118. 

Tegn£r-F6rbundet, 118. 
Stenography, 101. 
Students' Aid Fund, 128. 
Students' Union, 116. 
Studies, Groups of, 21—25. 
Summary of Enrolment, 167. 
Svenska Vitterhetssallskapet, 118. 
Swedish Language, 19, 47. 



Penmanship, 99. 

Phrenokosmian Society, 117. 

Physical Culture, 120. 

Physics and Chemistry, Labora- 
tory, 114. 

Piano, Course in, 78 ff. 

Postgraduate Courses: 
College, 51. 
Seminary, 62 ff. 

Preparatory Department, 20. 

Principal of Ladies' Hall, 10. 

Prohibition League, 121. 



Teacher's Certificate Course, 49. 
Tegner-Forbundet, 118. 
Theological Seminary, 54 ff. 
Theory, Course in, 85. 
Tuition: 

Academy, College, and Normal, 
107. 

Conservatory, 88 ff. 

School of Art, 91. 

Elocution, 93. 

Commercial Department, 104. 
Typewriting, 102. 



Units for Admission, 16, 17. 

Voice, Study of, 81. 
Violin, Course in, 83. 



INDEX 



175 



Wennerberg Chorus, 125. 
Worship, Public, 106. 

Year, Division of, 106. 



A new schedule of tuition and fees will be 
published in the Summer Bulletin to take 
effect next Fall Term. 



AUGUSTAN A BULLETIN 

Issued Quarterly by Augustana College and Theological Seminary/' Rock Island, 111. 
SERIES XIV MARCH 3J, J9J9 No* J 



CATALOG 

OF 

Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 







1918—1919 
FIFTY-NINTH YEAR 



Entered April 18, 1905, at Rock Island, Illinois, as second class matter under Act of Congress 
of July 16, 1894. 

Acceptance for mailing at special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 
3, 1917, authorized July 25, 1918. 



BOBfl 



CATALOG 



OF 



Augustana College and 
Theological Seminary 

ROCK ISLAND, ILLINOIS 



1918-1919 

Fifty-Ninth Year 

WITH ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR 1919—1920 




ROCK ISLAND, ILL. 

AUGUSTANA BOOK CONCERN, PRINTERS AND BINDERS 
1919 






CALENDAR 



1919 



JANUARY 
S MT w T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 910 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 

MAY 

S M T w T F S 

12 3 
*4*5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
26 26 27 28 29 30 31 



FEBBUAEY 

S MT w T E S 



2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 . . 



JUNE 

S MT w T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

S 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



MARCH 



APRIL 



S MT w T F S 
1 


2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 16 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


JULY 



S MT w T F S 

....12346 
6 1 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 2122 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 . . . . 



S M T w T F S 

.... 1 2 3 4 6 
7 8 9 101112 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



AUGUST 
B MT w T F 8 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 8 
10 11 12 13 14 15 10 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



SEPTEMBEB 

S M T w T F 8 

..123456 
7 8 9 101112 13 
14 15 16 17 18 18 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 



OOTOBEB 

S M T w T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 . . 



NOVEMBEB 
S M T w T F S 



2 3 4 6 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 



DECEMBEB 

S M T w T F S 

..123456 
7 8 910111213 
14 15 16 17 18 29 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



Easter Sunday, April 20. Pentecost, June 8. 



JANUARY 
S M T w T F S 



12 3 
*4 6 *6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



1920 



FEBBUABY 

S MT w T F S 

12 3 4 6 6 7 

8 91011121314 

15 16 17 18 29 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 



MAECH 



S MT w T F S 

..123466 
7 8 9101112 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 



APRIL 



S MT w T F S 

12 3 

*4 6 *6 'i 8 910 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 26 27 28 29 30 . . 



MAY 



JUNE 



JULY 



AUGUST 



S M T w T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 2C 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 

SEPTEMBEB 

S M T w T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 26 
26 27 28 29 30 . . . . 



S M T w T F S 

....12345 
6 7 8 9101112 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 2122 23 24 26 26 
27 28 29 30 



OOTOBEB 

S MT w T F S 

12 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 26 26 27 28 29 30 
31 



S M T w T F S 

12 3 

4 *6 *6 *7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



NOVEMBEB 

S M T w T F S 

..123456 
7 8 910 111213 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 ....... . 



5 MT w T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 91011121314 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 28 26 27 28 

29 30 31 

DECEMBEB 

S M T w T F S 

12 3 4 

6 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 26 

26 27 28 29 30 31 .. 



Easter Sunday, April 4. Pentecost, May 23. 



Sckool Calendar 



1919 
FALL TERM 
Registration and Examinations for|9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion ( September 1 and 2. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 3. 

Recitations in College, Academy, ConO 
servatory, and Commercial Depart- (.9: 20 A. M., Wednesday, Sept. 3. 
ment begin J 

., A . , AJ m x , n . (Tuesday and Wednesday, Sept. 23 

Matriculation for the Seminary ) a nd 24 

Opening Services in the Seminary 7:30 P. M., Wednesday, Sept. 24. 

Reformation Day Friday, October 31. 

„,, , . . „ (Thursday and Friday, Nov. 27 

Thanksgiving Recess < - 28 

Term ends 6 P. M,. Thursday, Dec. 18. 

1920 

SPRING TERM 

Recitations in the Conservatory begin 8 A. M., Monday, Jan. 5. 

Registration and Examinations for|9 A. M., Monday and Tuesday, 

Admission and Promotion (Jan. 5 and 6. 

Public Opening in Chapel 9 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 7. 

Recitations in College, Academy, and] 

20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 7. 



V 



Commercial Department begin. 

Lectures in the Seminary begin .9:20 A. M., Wednesday, Jan. 14. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary begins 5 P. M., Wednesday, March 24. 
Easter Recess in the College, Acade-1 

my, and Commercial Department INoon, Thursday, April 1. 

begins J 

Easter Recess ends £ A. M., Tuesday, April 6. 

Easter Recess in the Seminary ends 8 A. M., Wednesday, April 7. 

Founders' Day Tuesday, April 27. 

Recitations and Lectures cease 6 P. M., Friday, May 21. 

Commencement Exercises May 21 — 25. 

FALL TERM, 1920 

Registration ,. .August 30 and 31. 

Recitations begin September 1. 

Seminary opens . . ., September 22. 



AUGUSTAXA COLLEGE AXD THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Board of Directors 



MEMBERS 

Rev. GUSTAF ALBERT BRAXDELLE, D.D., R.X.O., President of Synod, 
ex officio member. 

Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT AXDREEX, Ph.D., D.D., R.X.O., K.V.O., Presi- 
dent of the institution ex officio member. 

TIME EXPIRES 

Rev. JOSEPH ALFRED AXDERSOX, A.M., Boxholm, Iowa 1919 

Mb. JOHX HEXRY HAUBERG, A.B., LL.B., Rock Island, 111 1919 

Mb. KXUT THEODORE AXDERSOX, Rock Island, 111 1919 

Rev. GOTTFRED NELSON, Chicago, 111 1919 

Rev. ERIC PETER OLSSOX, D.D., Courtland, Kans 1920 

Rev. JOHAX FREDERICK SEEDOFF, Rockford, 111 1920 

Judge LEOXARD TELLEEX, Cambridge, 111 1920 

Mb. BYROX LIXDGREX, Minneapolis, Minn 1920 

Rev. AMAXDUS FRIDOLF BERGSTROM, Denver, Colo 1921 

Rev. CARL ALFRED LUXD, Escanaba, Mich 1921 

Mb. XILS AXTOX XELSOX, Chicago, 111 1921 

Mb. CHARLES JOHX EKFELT, Ottumwa, Iowa 1921 

Rev. A. THEODORE EKBLAD, A.M., Superior, Wis 1922 

Rev. PETER AUGUST MATTSOX, Ph.D., D.D., Cannon Falls, Minn.. 1922 

Me. ANDREW JOHXSOX, M.D., Omaha, Xebr 1922 

Coxsux LAWREXCE LOUIS MALM, Cleveland, Ohio 1922 

OFFICERS 

Rev. JOS. A. AXDERSOX", Boxholm, Iowa, President. 

Rev. A. THEO. EKBLAD, Superior, Wis., Secretary. 

*Pbof. AXDREW KEMPE, Rock Island, 111., Treasurer. 

Mb. DAVID BECKSTROM, Rock Island, 111., Acting Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Rev. JOS. A. AXDERSOX, Pres. *Pbof. AXDREW KEMPE, ex officio. 
Db. G. A. AXDREEX, ex officio. Rev. A. F. BERGSTROM. 

Mb. JOHX H. HAUBERG. Rev. J. F. SEEDOFF. 

Mb. K. THEO. AXDERSOX, Sec'v. Mb. C. J. EKFELT. 
Mb. DAVID BECKSTROM, Acting Treasurer. 

* Died October 16, 1918. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Faculty and Instructors 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., D.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

731— 35th St. 

Rev. EDWARD PRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Vice President. 



Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Secretary of the General Faculty. 



741— 34th St. 



1739— 11th Ave., Moline 



CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Economics. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 



3808— 8th Ave. 



Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Cor. 9th Ave. and 34th St. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 



741— 34th St. 



Rev. NILS FORSANDER, D.D., R.N.O., 

Professor Emeritus of Church History, Pastoral Theology, etc. 



608— 38th St. 



Rev. CONRAD EMIL LINDBERG, D.D., LL.D., R.N.O., 

h\ 

-o 



Professor of Systematic Theology, Apologetics and Church Polity. 

3826— 7th Ave. 



Oscar II Professor of Natural History. 

Rev. CARL OTTO GRANERE, Ph.D., 

Librarian Emeritus. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 



Pierson, Fla. 



937— 43rd St. 



626— 38th St. 



Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 



970— 38th St. 



1) Duties performed during the year by Prof. J. H. Paarmann. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMLNAEY 

Rev. CARL AUGUST BLOMGREN, Ph.D., 

Professor of Hebrew, Old Testament Exegesis, and Evangelistics. 

825— 35th St. 

Rev. SVEN GUSTAF YOUNGERT, Ph.D., D.D., 

Professor of Philosophy, Theological Propedeutics, Biblical Introduction, Catechetics 

and Liturgies. 

960— 38th St. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

842— 44th St. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A. M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Chemistry. In charge of Physics during 1918 — 19. 

2829—11% Ave. 

Rev. CARL JOHANNES SoDERGREN, A.M., D.D., 

Professor of New Testament Exegesis and Homiletics. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 



1010— 38th St. 



1647— 37th St. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc.B., Ph.B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Mechanical Drawing, and Astronomy. 

3906— 7th Ave. 

PETER WILLIAM BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

3922— 8th Ave. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy. Instructor in Education and Spanish in College. 

1001— 20th St. 

Rev. ADOLF HULT, B.D., 

Professor of Church History, Symbolics, Biblical and Pastoral Theology and Hymnology. 

1739 — 11th Ave., Moline 



OLOP GRAFSTRoM, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

831— 44th St. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Professor of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

727— 19th St. 

*ALGERT ANKER, 

Professor of Violin and History of Music. Director of Orchestra. 

3906— 7th Ave. 

EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

1428— 12th St., Moline 

Died December 3, 1918. 



ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 7 

ARVID SAMUELSON, 

Director of Conservatory, Professor of Piano, Advanced Piano Pedagogy, and Conductor of 
Handel Oratorio Society and the Oriole Club. 

1726— 28th St. 

LILLIE CERVIN, B.Sa, 

Instructor in Piano. 

3814— 7th Ave. 

JAMES FRANKLIN PAGE, B.Pd., B. Ph., A.M., 

Assistant Professor in English. Instructor in Education. 

3906— 7th Ave. 
JESSE FRANK FRYSINGER, 
Head of Organ and Theoretical Departments. 

2026 Le Claire St., Davenport, la. 



GUSTAF HOLMQUIST, 

Head of the Voice Department. 

LUDVIG BECKER, 

Head of the Violin Department. 

ESTHER FRYXELL, 

Instructor in Piano. 



Augustana College 

Augustana College 

715— 3rd St., Moline 



ALTHEA BROWN, 

Instructor in Voice during the First Semester of Fall Term. 

1202— 12th St., Moline 

KARL GOTTFRID LARSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Natural Science, Academy. 

966— 38th St. 

Rev. IRA OLIVER NOTHSTEIN, A.M., 

Librarian, Professor of Library Science, and Curator of Museum. 

3113— 8th Ave. 

OSCAR LEONARD NORDSTROM, A.B., 

Principal of Commercial Department, Commercial Law and Accounting. Civics and United 
States History in Academy. 

3932— 8th Ave. 

JUERGEN HERMAN PAARMANN, B.S., M.S., 

Assistant Professor of Biology and Geology. 

Academy of Science, Davenport, la. 

VIRGILIUS THURE ANSELM FERM, A.B., 

Director of Band. . 

Dormitory 

RUTH AMALIA CARLSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Latin, German, and History in the Academy. 

1016— 18th Ave., Moline 

HULDA PETERSON, 

Instructor in Violin. 

510— 11th St. 

CARL GEORGE ENGDAHL, A.B., 

Instructor in History, part of Fall Term. 

1011— 44th St. 



8 



AUGTJSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



HARRY EDGAR OLSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Natural Science, Academy, and Laboratory Assistant in Physics, part of Fall 

Term. 

BLANCHE MILDRED CARPENTER, A.B., 

Instructor in Shorthand, Typewriting, English and Office Training, Commercial Department. 

717— 19th St. 
ANNA PETERSON, 
Instructor in Piano. 

811 Mound St., Davenport, la. 

NILS HOLGER PEARSON, A.B., 

Acting Physical Director. 



FLORENCE BERGENDAHL, 

Instructor in Voice, Spring Term. 

MYRTLE MABEL JOHNSON, 

Assistant in Preparatory English. 

ELMER CLARENCE JOHNSON, 

Assistant in Commercial Arithmetic, Spring Term. 



Dormitory- 



Ladies' Hall 



ELSIE ALPREDA OLSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Fall Term. 



Ladies' Hall 



BLANCHE LINNELL SEARLE, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory United States History, Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. 

Ladies' Hall 

MYRTLE MARGARET SWANSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Spring Term. 



MYRTLE VIOLA CAROLINE WESSEL, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic. 

JOHN ALFRED ELSON, 

Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 

FREDERICK CLARK FREYTAG, 

Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. 

HUGO CHRISTIAN LARSON, 

Laboratory Assistant in Physics, Spring Term. 

ROLAND OTTO SALA, 

Store-room Assistant in Chemistry, Fall Term. 

ERIC HERBERT WAHLSTROM 

Laboratory Assistant in Academy Physics, Fall Term. 



1407— 11th St. A 



616— 4th Ave. 



Dormitory 



Dormitory 



3906— 8th Ave. 



2522— 8th Ave. 



Dormitory 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



OFFICERS OF STUDENTS ARMY TRAINING CORPS 



FALL TERM 

LIEUT. WILLIAM J. SMITH, 
Detached service of Machine Gun Company. From 303d Infantry. 

LIEUT. GUY PAYNE SANDERSON, 
From 12th Company, R. O. T. C, Fort Sheridan. 

LIEUT. ISADORE PERSTEIN, 
From 10th Company, R. O. T. C, Fort Sheridan. 

LIEUT. ALBERT PIERSON, 
From Small Arms Firing School, Camp Perry, Ohio. 



10 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



Officers and Standing Committees 



Matriculation Committee in Seminary — Rev. Dr. G. A. Brandelle, 
President of Synod, Rev. Jos. A. Anderson, Secretary of Synod, President 
G. A. Andreen, Professors C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Secretary), 
S. G. Youngert, C. J. Sodergren, and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Appointments — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren, S. G. Youngert, C. J. Soder- 
gren, S. J. Sebelius (Secretary), and Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Students' Aid — President G. A. Andreen, Professors 
C. E. Lindberg, C. A. Blomgren (Treasurer), S. G. Youngert, C. J. Soder- 
gren, Adolf Hult (Secretary), C. W. Foss, C. L. E. Esbjorn, J. Mauritz- 
son (Chairman), and S. J. Sebelius (Vice Chairman). 

Library and Museum Committee — President G. A. Andreen (Chair- 
man), Rev. I. 0. Nothstein (Secretary), Professors Adolf Hult, A. W. 
Kjellstrand, S. G. Youngert, and J. P. Magnusson. 

Library Staff — Rev. Ira 0. Nothstein, Librarian; Drusilla Vera Erick- 
son, Library assistant; Gertrude Jacobson, Herbert Levin (Fall 
Term), Elmer Hult (Spring Term), student library assistants. 

Board of Control of Public Meetings — President G. A. Andreen (Chair- 
man), Professors C. J. Sodergren, I. M. Anderson (Secretary), 0. L. 
Nordstrom, and A. Samuelson. 

Board of Control of Athletics — President G. A. Andreen (Chairman), 
Professors S. G. Youngert, L. W. Kling, A. R. Wallin, Messrs. D. Beck- 
strom (Treasurer), Fred. Peel, Alvin Aimer, Martin Collins (Secretary). 

Board of Control of Forensics — President G. A. Andreen, Professors 
E. F. Bartholomew, A. W. Kjellstrand, Mr. K. T. Anderson, Mr. David 
Beckstrom, Miss Gertrude Jacobson, Mr. James Fitzpatrick, and Mr. 
Eric Wahlstrom (Secretary). 

Curator of Archives — Prof. C. W. Foss. 

Librarian and Curator of Museum — Rev. I. 0. Nothstein. 

Secretary of General Faculty — Prof. Adolf Hult. 

Secretary of Theological Faculty — Prof. C. J. Sodergren. 

Secretary of College Faculty — Prof. A. R. Wallin. 

Secretary of Conservatory Faculty — Miss Esther Fryxell. 

Secretary of Commercial Faculty — Miss Blanche Carpenter. 

Class Guardians in Seminary — Senior: Prof. C. A. Blomgren; Middle: 
Prof. A. Hult; Junior: Prof. S. G. Youngert. 

Class Guardians in College and Academy — Seniors: Prof. E. F. Bar- 
tholomew; Junior: Prof. C. W. Foss; Sophomore: Prof. C. L. Esbjorn; 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 11 

Freshman: Prof. L. W. Kling; Fourth Class: Prof. W. E. Cederberg; 
Third Class: Prof. A. R. Wallin; Second Class: Prof. A. W. Kjellstrand; 
First and Preparatory: Prof. P. Benzon. 

Class Guardians in Conservatory — Prof. Arvid Samuelson and Miss 
Esther Fryxell. 

Class Guardians in Commercial Department — Prof. O. L. Nordstrom 
and Miss Blanche Carpenter. 

Students* Council — Honor System: Wilbur Palmquist (President), 
Martin Collins, Amos Lundquist, Elizabeth Nelson (Secretary), Myrtle 
Wessel, Regina Holmen, Helen Collins, Alexander Bernstein, Henry 
Hedlund. 

Committee on Absences, Seminary — Prof. Adolf Hult. 

Committee on Absences, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Absences, Commercial Department — Miss Blanche Car- 
penter. 

Committee on Absences, Conservatory Department — Prof. Arvid Sam- 
uelson. 

Enrolling Officer and Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. C. L. 
Esbjorn. 

Assistant Registrar, College and Academy — Prof. Peter Benzon. 

Schedule Committee, College and Academy — Professors W. E. Ceder- 
berg and C- L. Esbjorn. 

Committee on Student Organizations, General Faculty — Professors 
S. J. Sebelius, C. E. Lindberg, J. P. Magnusson. 

Committee on Student Organisations, College and Academy — Profes- 
sors C. L. Esbjorn, A. W. Kjellstrand, and I. M. Anderson. 

Committee on Curriculum, College — Professors C. L. Esbjorn, L. W. 
Kling, and W. E. Cederberg 

Committee on Scholarships — Professors C. W. Foss, S. J, Sebelius, and 
Peter Benzon. 

Committee on Rules, College and Academy — Prof. L. W. Kling. 

Editor of Catalog — President G. A. Andreen. 

Secretary to the President — Miss Emma Elizabeth Fant. 

Secretary to the Treasurer — Miss Nancy Olson. 

Principal of Ladies' Hall — Mrs. Olive Rydholm. 

Matron— Mrs. Hilda Watson. 



12 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINABY 



General Statement 



Augustana College and Theological Seminary is owned and supported 
by the Evangelical Lutheran Augustana Synod of North America. While 
it is, therefore, a denominational institution, and as such aims to serve, 
primarily, the interests of the Lutheran Church, it is not sectarian in 
any narrow sense of the term. It throws its doors open to all who 
desire a liberal education based upon the Christian religion and perme- 
ated by the Christian spirit. Its original scope, which was that of a 
school for the education of ministers of the gospel, has from time to 
time been broadened, so that at the present time the institution, while 
retaining the Theological Seminary as a university department, aims 
to prepare, directly or indirectly, for all occupations and professions, 
by giving, in a variety of departments, the general culture or special 
training which modern conditions require. Its courses of instruction 
are patterned after the most modern and approved models, and qualita- 
tively, at least, Augustana College aims to be in the front rank of 
American institutions of learning. The English language is used as a 
medium of instruction in all subjects, except the Swedish language 
and literature, and some of the theological branches. The subject of 
Swedish, however, naturally occupies a prominent position in the 
curriculum. Indeed the most ample facilities are provided for the study 
of the language, history and literature of the Northland. This not 
only because the institution is mindful both of its origin and of its 
future mission as an exponent of Swedish-American culture, but because 
it studies to supply the present day practical needs of its students. 

All the departments of the institution, except the Theological Semi- 
nary, are open to students of both sexes. 

The location of the institution is such as to leave little to be desired 
on the score of accessibility, healthfulness, and beauty of surroundings. 
It is the object of the management to throw about the student all the 
influences which favor a healthy and harmonious physical, mental, and 
moral development. 



AUGTJSTANA COLLEGE AND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 13 



Departments and Courses 

The institution comprises the following seven Departments or 
Schools : 

I. THE PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT, in which boys and girls 
deficient in common school branches are prepared for admission to the 
Academy. 

II. THE ACADEMY. This Department has in view the twofold object, 
first, of preparing students for entering College, and, secondly, of afford- 
ing young men and women whose circumstances do not permit their 
taking a college course the opportunity of acquiring a more complete 
general education than can be obtained in the common schools. 

III. THE COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT is designed to give the 
systematic discipline in liberal studies usually required for the bacca- 
laureate degree. The curriculum is arranged on a combined "group" 
and elective system, and the degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on 
all who successfully complete the course of study in any group of this 
department. 

IV. THE NORMAL DEPARTMENT is designed to prepare for 
teaching in public or parochial schools. See College Department: 
Education and Teachers' Certificates. 

V. THE THEOLOGICAL DEPARTMENT affords instruction and 
training in all the theological and practical subjects entering into a 
proper preparation for the gospel ministry of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. 

VI. THE POST-GRADUATE DEPARTMENT offers courses leading 
to advanced degrees in literary and scientific as well as theological 
studies, under the direction of the Collegiate and Theological Faculties 
respectively. 

For courses leading to the degree of Master of Arts, see Collegiate 
Department, Post-Graduate Courses. 

For courses leading to advanced theological studies, see Theological 
Seminary, Post-Graduate Courses. 

VII. THE CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC AND SCHOOL OF ART, 
the former of which embraces four distinct courses: Preparatory; a 
Teachers' Certificate course, extending usually over three years and 
designed to train teachers of music; a Diploma course of one additional 
year, designed to furnish a thoro musical education; and a Post- 
graduate course of two years, intended for those who desire to pursue 
higher musical studies. In the School of Art instruction is given in 
Drawing and various branches of Painting, and also in Elocution and 
Physical Culture. 



14 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

The Collegiate, Academic and Preparatory 
Departments 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS 



Rev. GUSTAV ALBERT ANDREEN, Ph.D., D.D., R.N.O., K.V.O., 

President. 

CLAUDE W. FOSS, Ph.D., 

Professor of History and Economics. 

CHARLES LINUS EUGENE ESBJORN, A.M., 

Professor of the German Language and Literature. 

Rev. EDWARD FRY BARTHOLOMEW, Ph.D., D.D., L.H.D., 

Professor of English Literature and Philosophy. 



Oscar II. Professor of Natural History. 

ISAAC MORENE ANDERSON, A.M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

LINUS WARNER KLING, A.M., 

Professor of Latin and French. 

Rev. JULES GoTE ULTIMUS MAURITZSON, B.D., 

Ericsson Professor of the Swedish Language and Literature. 

Rev. AUGUST WILLIAM KJELLSTRAND, A.M., 

Professor of English in the Academy. 

JOHN PETER MAGNUSSON, A. M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Chemistry. In charge of Physics during 1918 — 19. 

Rev. SVEN JOHAN SEBELIUS, B.D., 

Professor of Christianity. 

WILLIAM EMANUEL CEDERBERG, Sc.B., Ph.B., A.M., 

Professor of Mathematics, Mechanical Drawing, and Astronomy. 

PETER WILLIAM BENZON, A.B., 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Drawing. 

AXEL REYNOLD WALLIN, A.M., Ph.D., 

Professor of Latin in the Academy, Instructor in Education and Spanish in College. 



l) Duties performed during the year by Prof. J. H. Paarmami 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 15 

OLOF GRAFSTR6M, 

Professor of Painting and Drawing. 

IVA CARRIE PEARCE, Sc.B., B.E., 

Professor of Elocution and Public Speaking. 

EMIL ALEXIUS EDLEN, A.B., B.S., M.D., 

Medical Examiner. 

JAMES FRANKLIN PAGE, B.Pd., B. Ph., A.M., 

Assistant Professor in English. Instructor in Education. 

Rev. IRA OLIVER NOTHSTEIN, A.M., 

Librarian, Professor of Library Science, and Curator of Museum. 

JUERGEN HERMAN PAARMANN, B.S., M.S., 

Assistant Professor of Biology and Geology. 

KARL GOTTFRID LARSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Natural Science in the Academy. 

RUTH AMALIA CARLSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Latin, German, and History in the Academy. 

CARL GEORGE ENGDAHL, A.B., 

Instructor in History, part of Fall Term. 

OSCAR LEONARD NORDSTROM, A.B., 

Instructor in Civics and United States History in the Academy. 

HARRY EDGAR OLSON, A.B., 

Instructor in Natural Science, Academy, and Laboratory Assistant in Physics part of Fall 

Term. 

NILS HOLGER PEARSON, A.B., 

Acting Physical Director. 

MYRTLE MABEL JOHNSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory English. 

ELSIE ALFREDA OLSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Fall Term. 

BLANCHE LINNELL SEARLE, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory United States History. Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. 

MYRTLE MARGARET SWANSON, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Geography, Spring Term. 

MYRTLE VIOLA CAROLINE WESSEL, 

Teaching Assistant in Preparatory Arithmetic. 

JOHN ALFRED ELSON, 

Laboratory Assistant in Biology. 



16 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

FREDERICK CLARK FREYTAG, 

Laboratory Assistant in Chemistry. 

HUGO CHRISTIAN LARSON, 

Laboratory Assistant in Physics, Spring Term. 

ROLAND OTTO SALA, 

Store-room Assistant in Chemistry, Fall Term. 

ERIC HERBERT WAHLSTROM, 

Laboratory Assistant in Academy Physics, Fall Term. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 



Applicants for admission must furnish satisfactory evidence of good 
moral character and of such scholarship as will enable them successfully 
to pursue the courses of study in the classes to which they are assigned. 
Students coming from other institutions, whether high schools, acad- 
emies, or colleges, should present a properly certified, detailed state- 
ment of their work at such institutions. This statement, for which a 
blank will be furnished on application, should, if possible, be in the 
hands of the President of the institution before the fifteenth day of 
August in case the student expects to enter in September, and before 
the fifteenth day of December when the student expects to enter in the 
following January. .It Is desirable that a catalog of the institution 
attended should accompany the credits. 

THE ACADEMY 
For admission to the Academy an ordinary common-school education 
is required. Applicants for admission deficient in the common-school 
branches will be assigned to the Preparatory Department. 

THE COLLEGE 
A candidate will be admitted into the Freshman class upon presenta- 
tion of fifteen entrance units as defined by the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, viz.: 

English 3 units 

One Foreign Language 2 units 

Algebra 1 unit 

Plane Geometry 1 unit 

Science , 1 unit 

History 1 unit 

Electives 6 units 



Total 15 units 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 17 

The electives must be made up from the subjects in the list below. 
No subject is accepted for an amount less than the minimum or greater 
than the maximum mentioned in the list, and not more than four units 
may be offered in vocational subjects. 

Elective Units 
Christianity will be credited hour for hour. Maximum of 

credits allowed 14 credits 

Civics y 2 or 1 unit 

Drawing. Art Drawing y 2 unit 

Mechanical Drawing y 2 to 2 units 

Elocution y 2 unit 

Economics y 2 unit 

English y 2 or 1 unit 

Foreign Language. French 1 to 4 units 

German 1 to 4 units 

Greek 1 to 3 units 

Latin 1 to 4 units 

History y 2 to 3 units 

History of Education y 2 unit 

Mathematics. Algebra, Advanced y 2 or 1 unit 

Arithmetic, Commercial or Advanced y 2 or 1 unit 

Geometry, Solid and Spherical y 2 unit 

Trigonometry, Plane y 2 unit 

Music y 2 or 1 unit 

Pedagogy % unit 

Psychology % unit 

Science. Astronomy y 2 unit 

Botany % or 1 unit 

Chemistry y 2 or 1 unit 

Geology x / 2 unit 

Physics 1 unit 

Physiography y 2 or 1 unit 

Physiology x / 2 or 1 unit 

Zoology y 2 or 1 unit 

Swedish , 1 to 4 units 

Vocational Subjects 

Advanced Accounting y 2 to 2 units 

Agriculture % to 2 units 

Bookkeeping % to 2 units 

Business Correspondence % unit 

Commercial Geography y 2 to 2 units 

Commercial Law % to 2 units 

College Catalog. 2. 



18 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

Domestic Science % to 2 units 

Elementary Law y 2 to 2 units 

Manual Training y 2 to 2 units 

Stenography and Typewriting y 2 to 2 units 

Group Prerequisites 
The electives should include the "prerequisites" of the group the 
student wishes to enter. (See the statement of group requirements 
under Outline of Courses of Study, College). A candidate lacking any 
of these prerequisites will have the opportunity of making them up in 
the Academy. 

ADVANCED CREDITS 

No advanced credits will be given to candidates for admission to 
College, except 

1) for work of a distinctively college grade, in which case the candi- 
date must pass an examination in such work upon entering College; 
and 

2) for the work done by graduates of our own Academy in excess of 
the 15 units required for admission into College, for which extra 
work 10 college credits will be allowed. 

4 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATES 

Applicants furnishing certificates of work successfully completed at 
any institution of a grade equal to that of Augustana College or at any 
high school or academy on the accredited list of the North Central 
Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools will be given credit for 
such work without examination. In all other cases applicants for 
admission will be admitted by examination or on probation. No student 
will be received into the Freshman class who lacks more than one unit 
in the number of the required entrance credits. All entrance conditions 
must be removed within a year. For dates of examination for admis- 
sion, see Calendar, page 3. 

SELECT COURSES 
Students who do not wish to take a full course may select such 
studies in any department as they are prepared to pursue O advantage. 
But all such select courses are subject to the approval of the Faculty. 

ENROLMENT 
Students are not enrolled in any department of instruction until they 
have registered in the President's office, and have paid their tuition 
for the term in the Treasurer's office. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 19 

Applicants may be received at any time, but attendance at the opening 
of each term must be considered the rule, as work in all classes begins 
promptly on the first day, and students coming later are at a great 
disadvantage. 

CHRISTIANITY 
Every student is required to pursue the study of Christianity during 
each term of his residence at the institution. But no student is re- 
quired to make up any courses in Christianity below the class in which 
he is first enrolled. 

SWEDISH 

A very full course in the Swedish language and literature may be 
taken in connection with each of the groups in College. 

It should not, however, be inferred that a student must either take 
no Swedish at all or else the entire course. He may take up any course 
for which he is properly qualified and may then discontinue the study 
at the end of any complete course. 

It should be added that for the benefit of high school graduates and 
other students coming from schools where no opportunity has been 
offered for the study of Swedish, a three hour course in Swedish Gram- 
mar will be given thruout the first two years in College, thus affording 
a reasonably adequate preparation for the study of Swedish history and 
literature. Students of Swedish parentage are urged to devote as much 
time as possible to the study of the language of their forefathers. Senti- 
mental considerations aside, the practical advantages of such study to 
the clergyman, the teacher, the physician, the lawyer, the business man, 
the cultured man in any walk of life, are sufficiently obvious without 
being specially pointed out. 



20 



AT7GT78TANA COLLEGE 



Outline of Courses of Study 



Note. In the following schedules the numeral in parenthesis after 
each subject denotes the number of the course as described under 
"Courses of Instruction" (pp. 25 and ff. ). The other numeral after each 
subject denotes the number of "credits" for the course in question and 
corresponds to the number of recitations in the subject per week for 
one term — two hours of laboratory work, drawing, or elocution counting 
the same as one recitation. 





PREPARATORY 


DEPARTMENT 




FALL 


TEEM 






SPRING TERM 




Bible Readings (1) 
Arithmetic (1) 
English (1) 
Geography (1) 
Penmanship (1) 
U. S. History (1) 


2 
5 
5 
3 
2 
5- 


-22 


Bible Readings (2) 
Arithmetic (2) 
English (2) 
Geography (2) 
Penmanship (2) 
U. S. History (2) 


2 
5 
5 
3 
2 
5- 






ACADEMY 








FIRST 


CLASS 




FALL 


TEEM 






SPRING TEEM 




Bible Geography 
Algebra (3) 
English (3) 
Latin (3) 
Physiography (3) 


(3) 


2 
5 
4 
5 

4- 


-20 


Bible Geography (4) 
Algebra (4) 
English (4) 
Latin (4) 
Botany (4) 


1 
5 
5 
5 

4- 



-22 



-20 



SECOND CLASS 



FALL TEEM 

Biblical Biography (5) 1 

General History (5) 5 

English (5) or Swedish (5) 4 

Latin (5) 5 

Plane Geometry (5) 5- 



-20 



SPRING TEEM 

Biblical Biography (6) 1 

General History (6) 5 

English (6) or Swedish (6) 4 
Latin (6) 5 

Plane Geometry (6) 5—20 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 21 

THIRD CLASS 

FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

Bible Teachings (7) 1 Bible Teachings (8) 1 

English (7) 4 English (8) 4 

Any three of the following : Any three of the following : 

Latin (7) 5 Latin (8) 5 

German (7) 5 German (8) 5 

Algebra (7) 5 Solid Geometry (8) 5 

Zoology (7) 5 Physiology (8) 5 

Physics (7) 5—20 Physics (8) 5—20 

FOURTH CLASS 

FALL TERM SPRING TERM 

History of Missions (9) 1 History of Missions (10) 1 

English (9) 4 English (10) 4 

Any three of the following: Any three of the following: 

Latin (9) 5 Latin (10) 5 

German (9) 5 German (10) 5 

Chemistry (9) 5 Chemistry (10) 5 

Swedish (9) 5 Swedish (10) 5 

Civics (9) 5 United States History (10) 5—20 

Catechetical Training (9b) 5—20 

GRADUATION PROM THE ACADEMY 
The completion of the following units is required for graduation from 
the Academy: 

English 3 

Latin 2 

Algebra 1 

Geometry 1 

Science 1 

History 1 

Elective 7 

Total 16 units or 160 credits. 
The regular (not elective) courses in Christianity are also required, 
except that no student is required to make up any courses in Chris- 
tianity below the class in which he is first enrolled. 

COLLEGE 

The studies offered in the College are arranged in nine parallel courses 
or "groups" with leading subjects as follows: 
I. Classical Languages. 
II. Modern Languages. 
III. Latin and Science. 



22 AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 

IV. Physical Science. 
V. Biological Science. 
VI- Mathematics. 
VII. English. 
VIII. History. 

IX. Education. 
The groups are assumed to be equally difficult and honorable and are 
designed to promote specialization along some particular line of study 
of the student's own choice, while at the same time insisting upon 
certain fundamental disciplines with which it is believed every educated 
man of the present day should be familiar. 

The following requirements in Science and Foreign Language apply 
to all the groups: 

General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language. 

A. Science. A student who presents less than two units of science 
for admission must earn not less than six college credits in science. 

B. Foreign Language. A student who presents less than four units 
of foreign language for admission is required to take two years of 
foreign language in college. Those offering four or more units for 
admission are required to take one year in college. 

I. The Classical Group. 
Prerequisite: four units of Latin. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History— Greek (11), Roman (12) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Greek (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 28 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Christianity and electives 68 " 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

II. The Modern Language Group. 
Prerequisite: two units of German. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History— Medieval (13) , Modern (14) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

German (11), (12), (13), (14) 16 

French (11), (12), (13), (14), (21), (22) 26 

Christianity and electives 60 



120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



AUGUSTANA COLLEGE 23 

III. The Latin-Science Group. 

Prerequisites: four units of Latin, one unit of Chemistry, and one unit 

of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Latin (11), (12) 6 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 

Biology (11), (12), or (21), (22) 8 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 72 

120 

IV. The Physical Science Group. 

Prerequisites: one unit of Physics, one unit of Chemistry, and one-half 
unit of Advanced Algebra. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12), (13), (14), (23), (24) 24 

Physics (21), (22), (23), (24) 10 

Mathematics (11), (12) 8 

Christianity and electives 60 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

V. The Biological Science Group. 

Prerequisites: one unit of Physics, one unit of Chemistry, and one unit 

of Biology. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Drawing (Biological) (15), (16) 2 

Chemistry (11), (12) 8 

Biology (11), (12), (21), (22) 16 

Geology (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and Electives 70 " 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 



24 ATJGUSTANA COLLEGE 

VI. The Mathematical Group. 

Prerequisites : a half unit of Advanced Algebra and a half unit of Solid 
and Spherical Geometry. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), or (13), (14), or (15), (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Drawing (Mechanical) (17), (18) 4 

Mathematics (11), (12), (17), (18), (21), (22), also (23), 

(24), or (25), (26), or (27), (28) 28 

Physics (21), (22) 8 

Christianity and electives 62 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VI. The English Group. 

English (11), (12), (13), (14), (17), (18), (23), (24), (25), 

(26), (27), (28) 30 credits 

History— English (15) , American (16) 6 

Elocution (11), (12) 2 

Christianity and electives 82 " 

120 

See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

VIII. The History Group. 

English (11), (12), (17), (18) 10 credits 

History (11), (12), (13), (14), (15), (16), (21), (22), (25), 

(26) 30 

Elocution (11), (12), or Drawing (11), (12) 2 

Economics (21), (22) 6 

Christianity and electives 72 " 

120 
See also General Requirements in Science and Foreign Language, 
page 22. 

Note. As to Foreign Language the requirements for this group are 
as follows: Each student must in college earn three years of credit in 
one foreign language, or in secondary school and college combined earn 
the equivalent of three college years, two years of secondary school w